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Spds

mcflyssmcflyss Posts: 257
edited December 2009 in MTB beginners
Hi guys.

I regulary go off road on my bike, a few technical bits, small slopes, tiny drop offs etc etc... not sure what the correct name would be.. would that just be called off road?? Definaly not downhill as there are no big hills in sleepy Suffolk!

Any way, was thinking of getting some SPDs for my bike as people say they are safer... Would you recomend it for this type of biking or would i be better just staying with Flats?
Im thinking of getting some that have the dual purpose so i can still use them as flats for short rides etc.

I have SPD on my road bike and love them, but then im not wobblying all over the place on that!

Posts

  • SalsaSalsa Posts: 753
    I had some of those dual SPD/Flat pedals & found them a bit of a pain compared to my normal SPDs, but ymmv.
    They were not as easy to find the lock in position, I would be scooping my foot all over the place losing concentration trying to clip in. I ended up going to normal SPD's like on my other bike.
    As for if the SPDs are ok for where you ride, that's a personal thing really. I know it's probably not ideal but can you try your road bike pedals/shoe combo on the MTB on the trails you ride. I live in Norfolk so again it's pretty flat & I only ride SPD's now.

    I could let you have my dual siders for cheap if you want to try them out? But I found them not great as flats & not great as SPD's.
  • I've a pair of Shimano M324 SPD/Flat sided and will only use them for commutes. I thought they'd be ideal as I could also use the flat, but, I hate having to find the SPD side - I've bought them so I'm going to use them :(

    I personally don't like SPD on single track or technical routes. I've tried them many times, but I sometimes like to just lift my foot off and dab. I see many riders using them, so the answer will have to be go and try them out.
    CAAD9
    Kona Jake the Snake
    Merlin Malt 4
  • jadamsonjadamson Posts: 644
    there not necessarily more SAFE but they do stop you getting cut up shins. ive recently got some and have tried them and it takes a while to get used to them but when you are there great! ide recommend them.
  • tbeattbeat Posts: 119
    i recently added a pair of shimano m520 pedals, They are great on the open trails but i dont yet have the confidence when im on the narrow trails and i keep releasing my feet before i make a tricky descent or something... i was thinking about getting a pair of spd pedals with an alloy cage, so when im clipped out i still have a platform to push down on, otherwise my feet slip. has anyone tried the shimano m545 spds?
  • mcflyssmcflyss Posts: 257
    Cheers for the input guys, i spose it is one of thoses suck em and see kinda jobs.
    salsa, what kind of price were you looking at and would i get the cleats as well?
    Seen a set with Cleats for £20 i think on wiggle that i was gonna try.
  • scarsscars Posts: 360
    Hiya buddy,

    I would recommend you try clipless (say a friends set) before you splurge out cash, Its not for everyone and even in my own crew are split down the middle between flats riders and clipless riders.

    For single track (which is pretty much what you do) when I converted over to clipless i found more one with the bike and for more technical stuff I found i could control the bike much easier however falls n bails especially as a beginner you will no about, if the bike goes sideways prepare to follow it, so i wouldnt say they were safer at all but your pedaling is much more efficient.

    I would look at Shimano SPD over any for a beginner and turn the tension on the cleat quite low just while you getting used to them :)

    I think I seen a guy selling M520s on Ebay with cleats for £16

    Hope my 2ps worth is useful :)

    Regards,

    Ian
  • ceecee Posts: 4,553
    scars wrote:

    I would look at Shimano SPD over any for a beginner and turn the tension on the cleat quite low just while you getting used to them :)

    I am borrowing a mates spare spds and shoes tonight for a shot at the tatties.....

    however his advice was if you get spds, get time ones because they allow a certain amount of foot float, whilst the shimano ones lock your foot in one place....

    of course...he might just prefer time pedals
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I believe in the future of the human race.

    H.G. Wells.
  • scarsscars Posts: 360
    funnily enough ive not tried Times as they aint cheap.... but i tried Cranks Bros and hated them.. I cut my teeth on shimanos and I wont let them go now
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    cee wrote:
    scars wrote:

    I would look at Shimano SPD over any for a beginner and turn the tension on the cleat quite low just while you getting used to them :)

    I am borrowing a mates spare spds and shoes tonight for a shot at the tatties.....

    however his advice was if you get spds, get time ones because they allow a certain amount of foot float, whilst the shimano ones lock your foot in one place....

    of course...he might just prefer time pedals
    Shimano SPD's allow 5 degrees of float, plenty for a lot of people, more float could mean more movement required to disengage. That said, Time seem popular, but Shimano M520's at under £20 (merlin Cycles) are a brilliant low cost way to start.
  • mcflyssmcflyss Posts: 257
    well have bought a cheap pair for now, will see how i get on!!!!! sure will fall off a few times!!!!
  • scarsscars Posts: 360
    best of luck buddy, what did you go for in the end

    ps: try n learn on grass :wink:
  • scarsscars Posts: 360
    best of luck buddy, what did you go for in the end

    ps: try n learn on grass :wink:
  • mcflyssmcflyss Posts: 257
    Got some that are the same as the shimano ones from salsa for cheap:-)
    am used to them on me road bike so should be ok...... Famous last words hey!!!!
    http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu83 ... C00061.jpg
  • scarsscars Posts: 360
    They look alright mate, they should do the job and having a platform they should feel more natural to start with.

    Funnily enough Ive decided to go back to flats for a bit so my clipless setup going up for sale shortly
  • mcflyssmcflyss Posts: 257
    well if i like these but think i want some better ones... will give ya a shout!!!
  • I recently got a new Kona with SPDs as standard, so no choice for me!!

    I'm finding them great on rural roads, forest tracks and singletrack. But the thought of getting up very steep highland hills still gives me sleepless nights and cold sweats!

    I'm close to swapping them for flats... but not just yet!
  • scarsscars Posts: 360
    You should find clipless easier on hills mate, the addidional pull up as well as the push down should help climbs, just be ready to twist your heel if you feel your about to go, it will all come with practice :)
  • I've been using SPD's for 15 years on road and MTB. I guess originally it was all about going as fast as possible and spd's allow a more consistent and powerful pedal stroke (you can pull up as well as push down etc) They are fine with the sort of riding you describe. However I do feel that they limit your learning curve as feet are essentailly fixed to the bike attempts at things like manuals have always been half hearted. no problem going uphill as even on the steepest rocky faces - if it goes pear shaped you have a split second to unclip. Downhills though and they have lead to so many spills - as you are devoid of two useful points of balance and my skills are just not up to it. So i'm returning to flats this winter - and going back to basics.

    Dual sided are OK - they provide a bit more of a platform - although you will still slip off them on occassion. you wouldn't consciously go on a ride with the intention of using both sides - you would always clip in. but if the going gets hairy you've unclipped and you slam your foot down - there is something there for contact. Ideal for flip flps riding down to the beach though. With proper technique the shimanos only need very light torque unless you are putting out mega watts

    :wink:
  • It's funny how something works for some and not for others. I tried Shimano SPD's to start with, then progressed onto egg beaters. I used flats on my trials bike, and tried straps on a singlespeed I built once, otherwise I only use Clips.
    Ironically I only started using clips cos I thought that was what you were supposed to do. I love them on road and MTB.
    jedster wrote:
    Just off to contemplate my own mortality and inevitable descent into decrepedness.
    FCN 3 or 4 on road depending on clothing
    FCN 8 off road because I'm too old to go racing around.
  • mcflyssmcflyss Posts: 257
    well out tomorrow for the first time with them on my MTB!!! I wonder how many times i will fall off!!!
  • joshtpjoshtp Posts: 3,966
    iv just very recently moved to spd's on my main mtb. and, so far, i love them. i find that its easyer to controle the bike in thechnincal situations, and i get better poer transfer. i do like them, but i would not say they are safer, dear no. and i would recomend waiting till you are a more experianced rider before moving to them, its best to learn stuff on flats, it gives you the confidence, and ensures you learn the correct technique. iwould say stick with flats for a while, wait till you are a fairly proficient mtb'er, then make the move.
    I like bikes and stuff
  • Ive ust put some new SPD's (shimano)on my bike to replace some old battered ones and i forgot how much stickier new pedals are, Ive previously posted a few times saying how easy it is to unclip with spd's..... first ride out with new pedals, got stuck in mud and just keeled over to the side still attatched to the bike!!,

    apart from backing the tension screws right off, I also angled the cleats just slightly outwards to make sure the cleats unclip early when twisting the foot to disengage, theres still plenty of float in the pedal to make sure you foot doesnt pop by accident or to be putting strain on your knee

    Paul
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