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New rubber

Seamus 128Seamus 128 Posts: 16
edited September 2009 in MTB beginners
Hi all, iI was wondering what most people do as regards tyres, i'm running a GT Avalanche 1 and after 400 miles the rear tyre is shot, the front is only slightly scrubbed, they are Kenda Nevegals. 26 x 2.1 not sure what type they came as stock on the bike 08 model
So do I just stick a replacement tyre on the back, or stick the new one on the front and the lightly scrubbed one on the rear assuming its better to have more grip at the front ?
Or stop being a tightwad and buy a pair!
Also any tyre recommendations would be appreciated, my riding is 80% off road mainly moorland and bridalways

Posts

  • CraigXXLCraigXXL Posts: 1,852
    I have the same bike and changed mine to Panaracer Fire XC pro and really like them but others will say they're old hat now but I find them cheap enough and handle much better than the Nevegals nowhere near as much drag.
  • The single most important thing about tyres, is the rubber compound. Not the tread, and not even the width (unless especially wide, ie 2.5 ins).

    Most manufactures will produce any one tyre model in several compound options. Softer compounds are more siutable for fast race conditions, giving especially good grip on loose dirt and damp rocks, etc. Harder compounds will usually still give good levels of grip for traction in most situations, but will not wear as quickly. Harder compounds are on average FAR more durable and long lasting than softer 'race' compounds.

    And because rear tyres almost always wear down quicker than fronts, I have a harder compound tyre (Maxxis Ignitor) on the rear, while the front is a softer 'race' compound Ignitor, for better grip and handling on corners.

    I've done about 1400 miles so far with these, and they are beginning to wear down quite alot now, needing changing soon. But not bad milage at all...!

    KK.

    PS: They grip quite well on tarmac too considering their tread!
  • I was amazed by the wear rate of these, I'm no powerhouse in the legs department and do most of my braking on the front, 400 miles seem a very short life expectancy, unless there a really soft compound, think I'll definatly look at bolting something a bit harder on at the back
    Cheers
  • BigStu2BigStu2 Posts: 794
    Put a Nevegal on the front again and a Kenda Straight 8 on the rear for outstanding grip and mileage.
    .........all
    ...at........work
    fun..................&
    ..no.............no
    .....is......play
  • BlackSpurBlackSpur Posts: 4,228
    Seamus 128 wrote:
    I was amazed by the wear rate of these, I'm no powerhouse in the legs department and do most of my braking on the front, 400 miles seem a very short life expectancy, unless there a really soft compound, think I'll definatly look at bolting something a bit harder on at the back
    Cheers

    OEM tyres (the ones that come with the bike) are often much lower quality than aftermarket ones - aftermarket Nevegals will be much better than your current ones. I wouls consider a Small Block 8 on the back though,
    "Melancholy is incompatible with bicycling." ~James E. Starrs
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 14,675
    That's a fact, the OEM Nevegals are OK but they're definately not as good as the normal ones.

    If you liked what you had with the old tyre- you didn't actually say!- then I'd suggest one of 2 things... If the front tyre is marked stick-e, keep it and fire either a 2.1 DTC Nevegal on the back, or one of the new 2.1 Kenda ExCavators- I just got one and so far, it seems like a Nevegal only better, basically.

    If on the other hand the front tyre isn't marked stick-e, put it on the back, then replace the front with a 2.1 stick-e Nevegal, which is a grippier compound.

    As for small blocks... I love mine, but it's september so they're going to be hung on the garage wall for a few months, these aren't winter tyres!
    Uncompromising extremist
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