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Wheel upgrade worth it?

connolegconnoleg Posts: 4
edited September 2009 in Road beginners
I have a Trek Madone 4.7 2008 that came with a fairly cheap and heavy wheelset - Bontrager Race.
I use the bike for commuting (100 miles weekly) and was looking to lighten the bike a bit as it seems quite heavy comapared to my weekend Focus Izalco 2009. Its most noticeable when climbing and accelerating. I have been looking and Mavic Ksyrium SL Premium & Easton EA90 SLX's have caught my eye so far. I need something that will cope with the yearly miles and British weather.

Is the upgrade a good idea? Should I consider and other wheelsets?

thanks
Gary

Posts

  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    A wheel upgrade is always a good idea, the biggest single step in improving performance.
  • skinsonskinson Posts: 362
    A wheel upgrade is always a good idea, the biggest single step in improving performance.

    I'd be interested to know how you come to this conclusion?
    Dave
  • Garry HGarry H Posts: 6,639
    skinson wrote:
    A wheel upgrade is always a good idea, the biggest single step in improving performance.

    I'd be interested to know how you come to this conclusion?
    Dave

    It's a widely held conclusion. As long as the contact points are suitable and the frame fits, then I can't see where else an improvement can be made. What would your suggestion be? Mind you, I wouldn't be spending 500 quid on a set of commuting wheels though!
  • skinsonskinson Posts: 362
    It's a widely held conclusion. As long as the contact points are suitable and the frame fits, then I can't see where else an improvement can be made. What would your suggestion be? Mind you, I wouldn't be spending 500 quid on a set of commuting wheels though!

    I Haven't come to any conclusion, I was just interested as to why so little a reduction in weight could have such an impact on performance. It's a widely held conclusion that we are alone in the universe, it doesn't make it fact!
    Dave
  • @ SKINSON

    Dave, are you saying that it's false to conclude that stronger lighter wheels with better bearings do not perform better?

    This is a genuine question as I am also looking to upgrade my current wheels set to the aforementioned Eastons.
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    Reducing the rolling weight has a bigger impact than a weight reduction on another part of the bike. The saying used to be that an ounce saved on the wheels is worth a pound on the frame (an exaggeration I know, but the principle holds).
  • skinsonskinson Posts: 362
    @ SKINSON

    Dave, are you saying that it's false to conclude that stronger lighter wheels with better bearings do not perform better?

    This is a genuine question as I am also looking to upgrade my current wheels set to the aforementioned Eastons.

    I wouldn't dream (on fear of getting banned by a certain moderator) of arguing the point! I just wanted to know how he came to that conclusion! I'll probably get new lighter wheels myself in the not to distant future.
    Dave
  • So purely supposition rather than evidence? Surely not; the market in new, expensive wheels is huge, I find it difficult to fathom that we all conclude that that better quality wheels are faster? However the principle of self fulfilling prophecy is on option, to be considered.
  • skinsonskinson Posts: 362
    So purely supposition rather than evidence? Surely not; the market in new, expensive wheels is huge, I find it difficult to fathom that we all conclude that that better quality wheels are faster? However the principle of self fulfilling prophecy is on option, to be considered.

    Well, you could look at it this way. A heavier wheel should in theory rotate for longer due to having more inertia! So, for riding on the flat and going down hills it should having overcome the initial resistance, give you more speed for less effort. The down side to this would be a greater effort needed to climb hills and acceleration would be slower. I think??
    Dave
  • InfamousInfamous Posts: 1,130
    True, that's why there have been disc wheels with weights in them!

    But there's much more to a wheelset than just how much it weighs.
  • LOL

    I knew the answer would be somewhere

    Sir Isaac Newton proposed his second law of motion

    Looks like I will keep my wheels for a wee while yet.
  • skinsonskinson Posts: 362
    Hmm! More or less what I said...
    Dave
  • GarzGarz Posts: 1,155
    What you have to bear in mind (at least I do) is if the wheels were that important, then why buy a bike and spend a fortune on the wheels when you could have invested in a better package in the first place?
  • skinsonskinson Posts: 362
    What you have to bear in mind (at least I do) is if the wheels were that important, then why buy a bike and spend a fortune on the wheels when you could have invested in a better package in the first place?
    Possibly because a lot of decent framed bikes come with less than ideal wheel sets?
    I'd sooner buy a decent frame, gruppo., and upgrade the wheels at a later date than settle for a cheaper frame, groupset and half decent wheels.
    Dave
  • GarzGarz Posts: 1,155
    I can understand from a beginner, however dave once you know more than the basics (or have owned a previous road bike) then to make this mistake is just sloppy. What I have learnt from my current bike will move with me.
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