Bike Locks

jteighty
jteighty Posts: 120
edited July 2009 in Road buying advice
Hi,

I know there has been thousands of posts and reviews on which are the best bike locks but i still haven't been able to identify a lock I need. I have a Boardman Road Comp (RRP £650) and I need a decent lock. I'm not planning to lock it over night but i do need to lock it up during the day. Everyone says that the Kryptonite NY is the best but it is also expensive. I usually lock my bike to a railing or a lamp post so i need the lock to be large enough to fit around there. I would like it to be relatively light and portable. The maximum I'd be willing to spend is around £40.I'm looking at the onguard pitbull and the Kryptonite Evolution series 4. Please leave your advice. I really need your help.

Thanks

JT80

P.S. Please don't just refer me to another post. Thanks.

Comments

  • fossyant
    fossyant Posts: 2,549
    Magnum (onguard) locks - look in halfords - get the gold rated one with the wheel cable.

    Parker International had the NY Mini for £55 recently - I bought it ! I've also got the Magnum lock.
  • jteighty
    jteighty Posts: 120
    fossyant wrote:
    Magnum (onguard) locks - look in halfords - get the gold rated one with the wheel cable.

    Parker International had the NY Mini for £55 recently - I bought it ! I've also got the Magnum lock.

    Are any sold secure gold locks better than any silver ones? I.e is the Magnum Plus Shackle better than the kryptonite evolution series 4 which is sold secure silver?

    Also what's better the Magnum Plus Mini Shackle & Extender Cable Bike Lock or the Magnum Plus Shackle bike lock? How do they compare to Kryptonite? Do they offer any anti-theft protection?
  • nferrar
    nferrar Posts: 2,511
    Gold rating resists attacks for longer (still a matter of minutes for most though). £40 isn't going to buy you much in the way of protection...
  • jteighty
    jteighty Posts: 120
    nferrar wrote:
    Gold rating resists attacks for longer (still a matter of minutes for most though). £40 isn't going to buy you much in the way of protection...

    Both the Magnum Plus Mini Shackle + extension cable and the Magnum Plus Shackle are under £45 and they are both gold rating.

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... yId_165637

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... yId_165637

    How do these compare to the onguard Pitbull and the kryptonite evolution series 4? Would these be good for my situation?
  • huuregeil
    huuregeil Posts: 780
    I'll refer you to another post first:

    http://www.londonfgss.com/thread17938.html

    These guys know their stuff! Worth having a read around there, cos these people are on the front-line, so to speak.

    Anyway, specific advice. Remember a few things:

    1. Any lock can get chopped.
    2. The way you chop a D-lock and a chain are different.
    3. The tools you require to chop different locks means that if you secure your bike with two different locks, the more chance you've got.
    4. The best single lock you can buy is a fat D-lock (e.g. Kryptonite., Abus Granit). Then come big fat chains (but these are expensive, then come strong cable locks (Abus steel-of-flex).
    5. Don't use a weaker lock to secure your bike.
    6. (The most important point) If you just want to buy one lock, buy a £50 NY Fagh or Abus Granit and leave it at that. I know it's out of your budget, but if you're concerned about getting it nicked, buy the best you can. They are genuinely harder to get into, but that's not the main reason for their added security. The main reason they work is that they're relatively the best around - wherever you park your bike, there will be other bikes locked up with relatively worse locks. Three guesses which bike theives go for first! You can argue till you're blue in the face which cheaper lock is better, but it's of little consequence cos all you need to be is better than the rest and there are only a couple of locks that sit at the top of the tree.
    7. Clever locking pays dividends. You can compromise your security by locking your bike up badly, even if it has a good lock.

    I regularly lock up my commuting bike (less than £1000 but more than £500) with a single chunky d-lock in the day. Not a problem for quite a while, but I am quite careful too.
  • andyp
    andyp Posts: 10,313
    Get saving. Paying £40 for a lock is false economy, as you are more likely to lose your bike if you lock it with a cheap lock.

    Personally I'd second huuregeil's post, by getting two locks, a Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit Mini and a cable lock such as the Abus Granit X Plus, and using them both you improve your chances of keeping your bike. The reasoning behind this approach is that your average casual bike thief will only carry one tool and with two different types of lock cannot break both of them easily. This will deter him and he'll move on to an easier target.
  • ride_whenever
    ride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    I've got a granit xtreme, it works for me, although it is a touch heavy.
  • jteighty
    jteighty Posts: 120
    I have found a Kryptonite New York Lock STD for £50. How does this compare to the fahgettaboutit? I also have a magnum rope lock that I used for my old bike, I don't know it's spec but I bought it for around £20. Will this do as a second lock (If I were to get the New York Lock STD)?

    Also isn't it annoying that the fahgettaboutit is very small? It means you can only attach it to gates as aposed to lamp posts?
  • dilemna
    dilemna Posts: 2,187
    I wouldn't buy another Kryptonite NY D-lock after mine was broken by a thief - easily by the look of it from the remains. They are no better than the other crap locks on the market. It is a false economy to buy a cheap lock. You will wish you had when your bike is nicked. If you have a Boardman bike that already has rasied it's profile so it is already marked as desireable.

    The only bike locks worth using are ABUS. I carry two Abus GRANIT X PLUS 54 D-locks one in each pannier. At approx £65 each, with a cycling club discount, I can leave my bike with reasonable piece of mind that it is going to be there when I get back. Don't bother with any cable lock as they are a total waste of time any decent cable cutter/bolt cutter will go through them as if cutting string. The only more secure lock is the Abus X-treme which some one has already referred to but IMHO it isn't long enough to lock through the both sides of the rear triangle and wheels onto an Oxford hoop or heavy duty railing. If they did an Extreme in a long D I would have bought that but they don't yet AFAIK. Spend the extra cash and get an Abus X plus Granit, preferably two one for the front wheel and frame, the other for the rear.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • jteighty
    jteighty Posts: 120
    dilemna wrote:
    I wouldn't buy another Kryptonite NY D-lock after mine was broken by a thief - easily by the look of it from the remains. They are no better than the other crap locks on the market. It is a false economy to buy a cheap lock. You will wish you had when your bike is nicked. If you have a Boardman bike that already has rasied it's profile so it is already marked as desireable.

    The only bike locks worth using are ABUS. I carry two Abus GRANIT X PLUS 54 D-locks one in each pannier. At approx £65 each, with a cycling club discount, I can leave my bike with reasonable piece of mind that it is going to be there when I get back. Don't bother with any cable lock as they are a total waste of time any decent cable cutter/bolt cutter will go through them as if cutting string. The only more secure lock is the Abus X-treme which some one has already referred to but IMHO it isn't long enough to lock through the both sides of the rear triangle and wheels onto an Oxford hoop or heavy duty railing. If they did an Extreme in a long D I would have bought that but they don't yet AFAIK. Spend the extra cash and get an Abus X plus Granit, preferably two one for the front wheel and frame, the other for the rear.


    I have briefly looked around and found the Abus X plus Granit for £54 inc delivery. Is this truly better than the kryptonite? Would any one else recommened it?

    http://www.cyclesportsuk.co.uk/product_ ... ts_id=5413
  • huuregeil
    huuregeil Posts: 780
    I think the NY Std/3000 and the X-PLus 54 are about comparable and either should do you fine, assuming you're not in London. (Next time you're out and about, look at other bikes and see how many better locks are out there). I certainly use one of these as my primary lock.

    By all means use your £20 Magnum to secure the front wheel to the frame and deter opportunistic thieves, but don't make the mistake of using it your primary lock (i.e. the lock that secures your frame to an imovable object - this has to be the strongest lock you own) and don't think it will majorly enhance your security to a dedicated thief.

    The thing with small locks is that one of the classic ways to break a d-lock is to put a hydraulic jack inside the D and pump it up - I think virutally all D's are susceptible to this. So, however you lock the bike, make sure that your get as much "volume" within the D itself (bike, wheel, bike locking hoop) - small locks make this easier, but buy a big enough lock to go round the objects you usually lock your bike to.
  • jteighty
    jteighty Posts: 120
    huuregeil wrote:
    I think the NY Std/3000 and the X-PLus 54 are about comparable and either should do you fine, assuming you're not in London. (Next time you're out and about, look at other bikes and see how many better locks are out there). I certainly use one of these as my primary lock.

    By all means use your £20 Magnum to secure the front wheel to the frame and deter opportunistic thieves, but don't make the mistake of using it your primary lock (i.e. the lock that secures your frame to an imovable object - this has to be the strongest lock you own) and don't think it will majorly enhance your security to a dedicated thief.

    The thing with small locks is that one of the classic ways to break a d-lock is to put a hydraulic jack inside the D and pump it up - I think virutally all D's are susceptible to this. So, however you lock the bike, make sure that your get as much "volume" within the D itself (bike, wheel, bike locking hoop) - small locks make this easier, but buy a big enough lock to go round the objects you usually lock your bike to.

    I live in London. Does that pose a problem?
  • GyatsoLa
    GyatsoLa Posts: 667
    Have you looked through the Lock review pages? I've found C+ lock reviews to be quite impressive in the past.

    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/ ... ries/locks

    Abus locks seem to consistently outscore every other make on any reviews I've seen. Kyroponite locks also score well but I note that some of their cheaper locks are occasionally poorly - possibly these are more intended to cash in on the brand awareness created by their top of the range locks.

    For the type of security you want, I think a small good quality shackle lock with a cable is a good compromise. Most bike couriers seem to use this combo and they usually know what they are doing. Its a combination I use for when I'm not locking my bike for long. For overnight, I wouldn't use anything less than an Abus Granit or a good quality heavy duty chain.
  • huuregeil
    huuregeil Posts: 780
    jteighty wrote:
    huuregeil wrote:
    I think the NY Std/3000 and the X-PLus 54 are about comparable and either should do you fine, assuming you're not in London. (Next time you're out and about, look at other bikes and see how many better locks are out there). I certainly use one of these as my primary lock.

    By all means use your £20 Magnum to secure the front wheel to the frame and deter opportunistic thieves, but don't make the mistake of using it your primary lock (i.e. the lock that secures your frame to an imovable object - this has to be the strongest lock you own) and don't think it will majorly enhance your security to a dedicated thief.

    The thing with small locks is that one of the classic ways to break a d-lock is to put a hydraulic jack inside the D and pump it up - I think virutally all D's are susceptible to this. So, however you lock the bike, make sure that your get as much "volume" within the D itself (bike, wheel, bike locking hoop) - small locks make this easier, but buy a big enough lock to go round the objects you usually lock your bike to.

    I live in London. Does that pose a problem?

    It's just... London bike thieves tend to be more "resourceful"! (Go down to Brick Lane market on a Sunday and see the active trade in nice bikes to see what I mean). If you're leaving it in a busy, open area with lots of other bikes: not a problem during the day with just one of those locks. If you're parking it in a quiet area, and in the same place at the same time every day, I wouldn't rely on just one lock and I'd definitely beef up the primary lock. Same applies overnight. And especially if your bike is a Boardman, thus new, desirable, and marketable.

    Or, the other way to look at it is that if you're not super anal about security, your bike has a moderate chance of being stolen. So, fine, get good insurance and don't stress overly, and don't get over attached to your bike, but do take care and see how it goes. You might spend less on locks, more on insurance, it's a trade-off. It's just I don't like giving thieving scum any chance!

    Good luck!
  • jteighty
    jteighty Posts: 120
    huuregeil wrote:
    jteighty wrote:
    huuregeil wrote:
    I think the NY Std/3000 and the X-PLus 54 are about comparable and either should do you fine, assuming you're not in London. (Next time you're out and about, look at other bikes and see how many better locks are out there). I certainly use one of these as my primary lock.

    By all means use your £20 Magnum to secure the front wheel to the frame and deter opportunistic thieves, but don't make the mistake of using it your primary lock (i.e. the lock that secures your frame to an imovable object - this has to be the strongest lock you own) and don't think it will majorly enhance your security to a dedicated thief.

    The thing with small locks is that one of the classic ways to break a d-lock is to put a hydraulic jack inside the D and pump it up - I think virutally all D's are susceptible to this. So, however you lock the bike, make sure that your get as much "volume" within the D itself (bike, wheel, bike locking hoop) - small locks make this easier, but buy a big enough lock to go round the objects you usually lock your bike to.

    I live in London. Does that pose a problem?

    It's just... London bike thieves tend to be more "resourceful"! (Go down to Brick Lane market on a Sunday and see the active trade in nice bikes to see what I mean). If you're leaving it in a busy, open area with lots of other bikes: not a problem during the day with just one of those locks. If you're parking it in a quiet area, and in the same place at the same time every day, I wouldn't rely on just one lock and I'd definitely beef up the primary lock. Same applies overnight. And especially if your bike is a Boardman, thus new, desirable, and marketable.

    Or, the other way to look at it is that if you're not super anal about security, your bike has a moderate chance of being stolen. So, fine, get good insurance and don't stress overly, and don't get over attached to your bike, but do take care and see how it goes. You might spend less on locks, more on insurance, it's a trade-off. It's just I don't like giving thieving scum any chance!

    Good luck!

    I see. I think I'll go with the Abus granit plus 54 as am not planning to leave it over night outside, only during the day for several hours. Thanks a lot everyone for your advice and time. :D:D