Forum home Mountain biking forum Health, fitness & training

Peak Fitness?

DC01DC01 Posts: 333
Hello all. Im having trouble trouble improving my general performance on my bikes. I commute everyday on my Rockhopper around 15 miles each day. No matter how hard i push i cant raise my average speed, and still feel the same amount of fatigue when i arrive at work or home. I dont bother monitoring my weekend rides as i see them more as fun thing. I have obviously improved since i first stated riding to work 18 months ago. reduced body fat and muscle mass up. But last couple of months no improvement of performance on the bike. Im 31, 6ft, a toned 14 1/2 stone, ex smoker for a year, eat healthy, football twice a week, have a few beers of a weekend and in general good health. Any ideas anyone or have i reached my personal peak fitness brick wall.

Posts

  • cgarossicgarossi Posts: 729
    I have more or less the same problem. I don't ride to work but I bike on Mondays and Wednesdays. Play football on thursdays.

    I am 15.2 stone and im desperate to get past the 15 stone barrier.
  • CycloRosCycloRos Posts: 579
    It all depends on how you go about measuring performance. Personally it's how I feel on the trails which is most important to me, I couldn't care less what the average speed on my commute is.

    Maybe you should try mixing up you're riding? Do you stick to the same commuting route every day? If so try taking different routes to/from work. You could try doing some interval training i.e. cruise for a few minutes then 20 seconds flat out repeating as necessary.

    Oh and make sure you get plenty rest too, it's just as important as your training methods.
    Current Rides -
    Charge Cooker, Ragley mmmBop, Haro Mary SS 29er
    Pics!
  • keirtristankeirtristan Posts: 296
    Throw a bit of swimming into the mix!!
  • weeksy59weeksy59 Posts: 2,606
    Does indeed sound like complacency.

    Your body had 'got used' to the type and form of exercise...

    Mix it up.
  • Ditch WitchDitch Witch Posts: 837
    CycloRos wrote:
    It all depends on how you go about measuring performance. Personally it's how I feel on the trails which is most important to me, I couldn't care less what the average speed on my commute is.

    Maybe you should try mixing up you're riding? Do you stick to the same commuting route every day? If so try taking different routes to/from work. You could try doing some interval training i.e. cruise for a few minutes then 20 seconds flat out repeating as necessary.

    Oh and make sure you get plenty rest too, it's just as important as your training methods.

    WHS


    You've become used to your routine. To keep seeing gains, you need to shakeup your regime every 6 weeks or so.

    Interval training is the way to go ;)
    I ride like a girl
    Start: 16.5.x Now: 14.10.8 Goal: 11.7.x
    www.ditchwitch.me.uk
    www.darksnow.co.uk
    Specialized HardRock Pro Disc 04
  • DC01DC01 Posts: 333
    cheers all. sound advice. i used to swim alot anyway so ill dig out the speedo s. :shock: can anyone advise on any so of pattern or programme to work against. not for the swimming as such but def on the bike any maybe even some gerneral fitness work that can be done indoors. i do a pysical job any way so strength aint a prob, but general stamina is.
  • Jonesy.Jonesy. Posts: 94
    Sounds to me like you need to improve your cardio endurance. I just posted a reply about that on this thread:

    http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtop ... t=12631969

    So you might actually be pushing yourself too hard and that's why you're not improving.

    Try doing longer but lower intensity training. For example, go for a much longer ride than usual, but do it at a slower pace so that you're not getting out of breath. In time, you will begin to reap the rewards, even if it feels counter intuitive at first.

    Oh and as you're already quite fit by the sounds of it, combining this lower intensity training with some interval training too is a good idea (but not at the same time, obviously). Plus mixing it up with different types of exercise as the others have suggested. But the key thing, I reckon, is the intensity of your training.

    If you want to get all sciencey about it, calculate your maximum heart rate and then keep your exercises within 65-85% of this maximum level, which generally means don't get so out of breath that you can't hold a conversation at the same time.
    3638691414_5b54d86f20.jpg
  • DC01DC01 Posts: 333
    is it worth speaking to a trainer to get a specific programme worked out? Im not really into the gym anymore and dont want to join one. Find it a bit boring, but would it be worth it to get a programme?
  • weeksy59weeksy59 Posts: 2,606
    Check a few of the older threads in this section. Some regular poster is a personal trainer and may do it for you for a beer :)
  • Jonesy.Jonesy. Posts: 94
    weeksy59 wrote:
    Check a few of the older threads in this section. Some regular poster is a personal trainer and may do it for you for a beer :)

    Or for an isotonic energy drink... :roll:
    3638691414_5b54d86f20.jpg
  • Ditch WitchDitch Witch Posts: 837
    DC01 wrote:
    is it worth speaking to a trainer to get a specific programme worked out? Im not really into the gym anymore and dont want to join one. Find it a bit boring, but would it be worth it to get a programme?

    Have a go yourself first. There's no real magic to it. Just ensure you have a good level of base fitness first. If you can cycle 15 miles each way, then you should be fine:

    http://www.cptips.com/intervl.htm


    There's lots of info out there. Get googling :)
    I ride like a girl
    Start: 16.5.x Now: 14.10.8 Goal: 11.7.x
    www.ditchwitch.me.uk
    www.darksnow.co.uk
    Specialized HardRock Pro Disc 04
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Do some weights. Based on no scientific research but almost 20 years of weight training, I think the benefits to overall health and fitness are massive.

    Not silly bodybuilder stuff = just a vigorous session 2-3 times a week. Helps prevent injury (strengthens core and support muscles), gives your heart something "different" to work at and helps with every sport known to man (or woman).

    Anyone doing anything remotely fitness orientated should push weights, even light or bodyweight stuff, regularly. It also makes you look better. Which is handy.
  • blister pusblister pus Posts: 5,780
    What kind of regimen do you have for light weights / 3 times a week, Matt?
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Blister - I used to do a full on weight gaining routine four times a week to put on weight - 3 stone in 18 months. Now it's more to maintain strength and fitness but it would help anyone out too.

    I do this:

    Heavy punch bag - 5 mins
    Skip - 2-5 mins

    LEGS
    Squats with 10kg in each hand x 20
    Lunges with 10kg in each hand x 20
    Calf raises with 10kg in each hand x 50

    CHEST
    10 normal press ups, 10 clapping press ups (to warm up)
    45 deep press ups - feet on swiss ball, each hand on a chair - go below "ground" level
    20 press ups with each hand resting on a dumbell

    Chest isometrics

    BACK
    20 pull ups
    20 single handed bent over rows - 20kg in one hand

    Back isometrics

    SHOULDERS
    10 handstand press ups against a wall
    20 shoulder raises - 10 kg in each hand

    Shoulder isometrics

    TRICEPS
    10 Chinese press ups (very hard!)
    20 french press each arm - with 10kg weight

    Tricep isometrics

    BICEPS
    30 curls - 10kg each hand
    20 concentration curls (15kg)

    Bicep isometrics

    ABS

    80 crunches
    50 swiss ball sit ups.

    STRETCH.

    Does the job!
  • blister pusblister pus Posts: 5,780
    Thanks for that, I'm not as radical as that but I'm not a million miles off that in terms of desired effect, weight amounts / reps etc - which surprises me. The one thing I do screw up on though is the STRETCH bit and end up with lactic acid stiffness (i think it is).
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Blister - it is pretty important. Do a very light stretch after the punch bag/skip (or any warm up) too.

    It's not a really hardcore routine (pull ups, chinese press ups and handstand press ups are hard though) - just keeps things working and keeps them strong. If you want decent gains, you need to really go for it.
  • CycloRosCycloRos Posts: 579
    Surf-Matt wrote:
    Blister - I used to do a full on weight gaining routine four times a week to put on weight - 3 stone in 18 months. Now it's more to maintain strength and fitness but it would help anyone out too.

    I do this:

    Heavy punch bag - 5 mins
    Skip - 2-5 mins

    LEGS
    Squats with 10kg in each hand x 20
    Lunges with 10kg in each hand x 20
    Calf raises with 10kg in each hand x 50

    CHEST
    10 normal press ups, 10 clapping press ups (to warm up)
    45 deep press ups - feet on swiss ball, each hand on a chair - go below "ground" level
    20 press ups with each hand resting on a dumbell

    Chest isometrics

    BACK
    20 pull ups
    20 single handed bent over rows - 20kg in one hand

    Back isometrics

    SHOULDERS
    10 handstand press ups against a wall
    20 shoulder raises - 10 kg in each hand

    Shoulder isometrics

    TRICEPS
    10 Chinese press ups (very hard!)
    20 french press each arm - with 10kg weight

    Tricep isometrics

    BICEPS
    30 curls - 10kg each hand
    20 concentration curls (15kg)

    Bicep isometrics

    ABS

    80 crunches
    50 swiss ball sit ups.

    STRETCH.

    Does the job!

    Reckon if I did that 3 times a week I'd have no energy left for riding :shock:

    But damn! I'd look good in a surf vest :wink:
    Current Rides -
    Charge Cooker, Ragley mmmBop, Haro Mary SS 29er
    Pics!
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Cyclo - that's the plan :wink::lol::lol:

    Add 2 or three 4-6 mile trail runs, four 12.5 miles rides and a load of surfing to that. Oh and lots of dog walking.

    That routine only take 3/4 of an hour - not too bad.
  • CycloRosCycloRos Posts: 579
    It's a good plan! but living where I do, the need to look good in a surf vest is pretty low :lol:
    Current Rides -
    Charge Cooker, Ragley mmmBop, Haro Mary SS 29er
    Pics!
  • blister pusblister pus Posts: 5,780
    Surf-Matt wrote:
    Blister - it is pretty important. Do a very light stretch after the punch bag/skip (or any warm up) too.

    It's not a really hardcore routine (pull ups, chinese press ups and handstand press ups are hard though) - just keeps things working and keeps them strong. If you want decent gains, you need to really go for it.

    I've got - and had - a ton of well intentioned *cough* yoga videos and books lying around for years. I'm seriously considering doing something with them. :D Combining yoga on the off weights days makes real sense now.
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    I've seen surf/rash vests being worn at very inland nightclubs before... :shock: :lol::lol::lol::lol:
  • CycloRosCycloRos Posts: 579
    oh dear! s'pose that depends on the kind of night clubs you frequent :lol:

    I've been taking the p*ss a bit but I do actually own 2 rash vests come to think about it, but they only ever get worn under a wet suit let me assure you :)
    Current Rides -
    Charge Cooker, Ragley mmmBop, Haro Mary SS 29er
    Pics!
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    I have several too... also under wetsuits only (unless it's warm enough to surf in boardies and a rashie...not often!).
  • DC01DC01 Posts: 333
    Cheers all for your help. will look into setting myself up a varied programme and will dig my weight set out the loft and possibly look into a rowing machine for more cardio based work. cant see the need for a surf board just yet, unless southend end on sea starts developing breakers. :lol: ta again.
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