Di2 on sale now

il_principe
il_principe Posts: 9,155
edited June 2009 in Commuting chat
Jaysus - it's a mere £2324.68...

http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=D0021

Comments

  • itboffin
    itboffin Posts: 20,061
    Jaysus - it's a mere £2324.68...

    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=D0021

    I might get one for my hybrid :lol:
    Rule #5 // Harden The Feck Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
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  • roger_merriman
    roger_merriman Posts: 6,165
    be intresting if it catches on and comes down market, i'll need to conviced that i need to charge my bike.

    but its very much something to watch.
  • _Brun_
    _Brun_ Posts: 1,740
    The shifters, derailleurs and electronic gubbins can be had for just £1300.

    Does anyone know if they're compatible with Sora chainset and cassette? I might email them and ask.
  • Eau Rouge
    Eau Rouge Posts: 1,118
    The real interesting thing will be when/if bike makers start to design bikes around it. Right now it's little more than an electronic version of what we already have, with a pretty clunky integration with the rest of the bike as it tries to fit into the current design. Someone is going to build a frame with a build-in battery location and fully internal wiring. There is no reason the rear mechs wire can't run inside a chainstay, for example.

    Some TT bikes have already started using the buttons thing to have gear shifters on more than just the ends of the aero-bars, for example. That sort of thing (shifter in all three hand positions on drop bars maybe) and mich better placement of the battery, etc will be interesting to see.
    Give them a few versions, but auto-gears anyone? Input your desired cadence range, it tries it's best to keep you there by shifting, no more input from you.
  • il_principe
    il_principe Posts: 9,155
    Eau Rouge wrote:
    The real interesting thing will be when/if bike makers start to design bikes around it. Right now it's little more than an electronic version of what we already have, with a pretty clunky integration with the rest of the bike as it tries to fit into the current design. Someone is going to build a frame with a build-in battery location and fully internal wiring. There is no reason the rear mechs wire can't run inside a chainstay, for example.

    Some TT bikes have already started using the buttons thing to have gear shifters on more than just the ends of the aero-bars, for example. That sort of thing (shifter in all three hand positions on drop bars maybe) and mich better placement of the battery, etc will be interesting to see.
    Give them a few versions, but auto-gears anyone? Input your desired cadence range, it tries it's best to keep you there by shifting, no more input from you.

    +1 I think the autoshifting thing has been mooted - it's have to be v easy to switch modes on the fly, but a nice idea.

    I'm following electronic with interest - I'm a total gadget freak. Maybe in 3/4 years time when it's all bedded in and I'm poss considering a new bike, that's when I'll jump on. Good like to all the MK1 guinea pigs for now.
  • Greg T
    Greg T Posts: 3,266
    I still haven't got a playstation.

    My life is an empty shell
    Fixed gear for wet weather / hairy roadie for posing in the sun.

    What would Thora Hurd do?
  • Gazzaputt
    Gazzaputt Posts: 3,227
    For the money the groupo costs better buying this http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Focus_Izalco_Extreme_Di2_2009/5360037580/
  • Christophe3967
    Christophe3967 Posts: 1,200
    Greg T wrote:
    I still haven't got a playstation.

    My life is an empty shell

    You have children - just be patient. :) After riding a bike round town I often feel that I have been in an interactive playstation game. You just don't get as many lives...
  • cullen_bay
    cullen_bay Posts: 256
    ive tried this stuff, its really nice.
  • Bassjunkieuk
    Bassjunkieuk Posts: 4,232
    Eau Rouge wrote:
    The real interesting thing will be when/if bike makers start to design bikes around it. Right now it's little more than an electronic version of what we already have, with a pretty clunky integration with the rest of the bike as it tries to fit into the current design. Someone is going to build a frame with a build-in battery location and fully internal wiring. There is no reason the rear mechs wire can't run inside a chainstay, for example.

    Some TT bikes have already started using the buttons thing to have gear shifters on more than just the ends of the aero-bars, for example. That sort of thing (shifter in all three hand positions on drop bars maybe) and mich better placement of the battery, etc will be interesting to see.
    Give them a few versions, but auto-gears anyone? Input your desired cadence range, it tries it's best to keep you there by shifting, no more input from you.

    I quite like the idea of seeing how the bike companies can integrate this into frames, at the moment I can see quite an interesting point whereby the wiring is fixed into the frame, could be interesting to just run thin metal strips on the inside of carbon tubes and just have terminals to connect to the shifters and mechs.
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  • lost_in_thought
    lost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    That 'sneak peek' video is a whole world of annoying! Nonetheless, if it works then good on them - it seems, however, that all they've gained in performance by computerising it is automatic indexing on the front derailleur... cool, but is it worth it?
  • Aidy
    Aidy Posts: 2,015
    That 'sneak peek' video is a whole world of annoying! Nonetheless, if it works then good on them - it seems, however, that all they've gained in performance by computerising it is automatic indexing on the front derailleur... cool, but is it worth it?

    The whole auto-trimming of the front derailleur is cool, but the entire system as a whole looks to have a stack of small advantages over a purely mechanical system. Other performance gains are shifting slightly too far and then back again, and shifting at optimal times.

    Worth it? Probably not - that's a fair chunk of cash :)
    Hopefully in time it'll progress down the groupsets though, we'll see.
  • Roastie
    Roastie Posts: 1,968
    Greg T wrote:
    I still haven't got a playstation.

    My life is an empty shell
    Freak.
  • cyberknight
    cyberknight Posts: 1,238
    didnt mavic do an electronic shifter donkeys a go? i remember the zap mavic on the tour de france?

    http://www.bikepro.com/products/rear_derailleurs/maviczap_rrder.html


    Yup 1994 i looked it up :)

    and pasted from a page...........


    Electronic gear-shifting technology has spent a long time in development. Prototypes of Mavic’s first system, the Zap, made a cameo appearance at the 1992 Tour de France and the company introduced its second attempt, the Mektronic, in 1999.
    FCN 3/5/9
  • cjcp
    cjcp Posts: 13,345
    didnt mavic do an electronic shifter donkeys a go? i remember the zap mavic on the tour de france?

    Yep, I think they did.

    Good review in this month's C+ about this. Battery on the downtube? Yuk. And imagine the wheels you could get for that price!
    FCN 2-4.

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    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • cyberknight
    cyberknight Posts: 1,238
    im sure the zap had the batteries in the handlebars i think its was a bit crappy as a unit but i suppose good for its time considering how far electronics have come since then

    gribble remembers when the zx 81 home pc came out with 1 k of ram :lol:
    FCN 3/5/9