What makes a good hybrid?

DonDaddyD
DonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
edited June 2009 in Commuting chat
OK since there are so many flower-powered-hippy-loving-anarchist-hybrid-loving-hybrid-lovers out there. Here's a chance to speak up about the virtues of hybrid bikes.

We know what makes a good road bike. A list by which all road bikes are judged. Likewise the same goes for Mountain Bikes.

What qualities should a person consider when choosing a hybrid?
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Comments

  • Stuey01
    Stuey01 Posts: 1,273
    Drop bars and skinny tyres

    :wink::lol:
    Not climber, not sprinter, not rouleur
  • artaxerxes
    artaxerxes Posts: 612
    What qualities should a person consider when choosing a hybrid?

    All the bits and pieces that should be on that type of bike in the first place, like mudguards, lights, panniers, bar end grips. Then it would be a continental style trekking bike rather than a hybrid.
  • roger_merriman
    roger_merriman Posts: 6,165
    the problem is lot of these terms of fairly broad verging on meaningless road bikes = racers are probably the narrowest. but even so a road bike for touring on is not likely to set the world alight down the TT loop.

    hybrid covers every thing from sit up and get town bikes to rigid MTB's with slicks to flat bared road bikes. MTB's some in all sorts of forms from heavy hitting downhill heavy weights to whippety XC racers and all sorts of varables such as jump bikes etc.

    and then what's good? eg the hybrids i suspect folks here would like, racy fast bikes, would be pointed out as unsuitable for purpose by a fair portion of the commuters as not comftable laid back bikes for shopping, and where is the basket? and so on.
  • R_T_A
    R_T_A Posts: 488
    Generally, most "average" people don't have the money or inclination to have more than one bike. What they are looking for is something that will do a bit of everything - road and trail, but not the extremes of both.

    So they're not looking for full-suss to do 50ft drops on the Alps, nor are they wanting to fly along roads on tyres the width of atoms breaking the sound barrier.

    Depending on what they're more likely to do more of, they'll either go for a MTB-styled hybrid or a Road-styled one.
    Giant Escape R1
    FCN 8
    "Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."
    - Terry Pratchett.
  • fnegroni
    fnegroni Posts: 794
    IMHO:

    Sturdy frame that can take seat tube mount brackets.

    Disc brakes, which are WAY better than rim-brakes and are a MUST unless you are one of those people who think slowing down at the same rate as you accelerate is good enough. I certainly don't think so. In town, you want maximum grip from the brakes, and off road, you must be able to stop!

    A more comfortable saddle when sitting is better than a lighter/race saddle, which is only good when pushing hard.

    A flat handle bar, because if you have only ever ridden road bikes, you haven't got a clue what you are missing.

    Infact, the best hybrid is a fully-rigid mountain bike with a road triple and slick tyres.
  • soy_sauce
    soy_sauce Posts: 987
    fnegroni wrote:
    ......
    Infact, the best hybrid is a fully-rigid mountain bike with a road triple and slick tyres.

    +0.5

    cos a fork with lockout with give the rider a extra option.
    "It is not impossible, its just improbable"

    Specialized Rockhopper Pro Disc 08
  • blu3cat
    blu3cat Posts: 1,016
    My ideal hydrid would have:

    Good confortable frame / forks
    Handlebars that aren't 18 miles wide so you can easily nip between traffic.
    Good tyres (Conti Top contact work well, unless you are going for mud)
    Not Twist shift - couldn't get on with it, never could , never will
    Decent gearing, not just a mountain bike triple, something like 48, 38, 38 upfront and 11-28 on the back.
    SPD pedals
    Rear carrier

    oh and loads and loads of hi-viz. Tons of it No, definitely more than your thinking. :)
    "Bed is for sleepy people.
    Let's get a kebab and go to a disco."

    FCN = 3 - 5
    Colnago World Cup 2
  • Stuey01
    Stuey01 Posts: 1,273
    I reckon this would be pretty close to the mark for a "one bike" in a hybrid style.

    2327-6643-main-ridgeback-flight-05-2009-hybrid-bike-3.jpg

    If I had only one bike it would be a hardtail mountain bike with skinny tyres for commute duties and knobblies for the weekend.
    Not climber, not sprinter, not rouleur
  • The Rookie
    The Rookie Posts: 27,812
    A good hybrid...
    Lightish hardtail MTB stye frame (classic style with near horizontal top tube) narrowish (by MTB standards) rims with semi slick tyres, disc on the front at least, uprightish (XC style) seating with flattish bars, comfy saddle, sufficient mudgaurding, rack on the back depending on circumstance and if you have suspension (depending on the roads you ride) having preload adjust and lockout.

    Or just see my avatar?

    Actually 'Hybrid' is meaningless as its just defines something that is 'neither fish nor foul' buts come to be accepted as something akin to my above ideal!

    Simon
    Currently riding a Whyte T130C, X0 drivetrain, Magura Trail brakes converted to mixed wheel size (homebuilt wheels) with 140mm Fox 34 Rhythm and RP23 suspension. 12.2Kg.
  • dilemna
    dilemna Posts: 2,187
    What makes a good hybrid?

    Good parentage :roll: :wink:.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,117
    blu3cat wrote:
    My ideal hydrid would have:

    Good confortable frame / forks
    Handlebars that aren't 18 miles wide so you can easily nip between traffic.
    Good tyres (Conti Top contact work well, unless you are going for mud)
    Not Twist shift - couldn't get on with it, never could , never will
    Decent gearing, not just a mountain bike triple, something like 48, 38, 38 upfront and 11-28 on the back.
    SPD pedals
    Rear carrier

    oh and loads and loads of hi-viz. Tons of it No, definitely more than your thinking. :)

    +1
    If it's to be used as intended - ie city work, leisure, light touring maybe - then I'd say V-brakes and c.28c tyres are on the list. I'd want bar ends also, but agree on the width of the bars - my Sirrus has ludicrous bars, am going to take a hacksaw to them tomorrow!

    Guards and rack are probably in. Decent saddle. No suss, possibly suss seat pillar?

    What we're really talking about is something that nabs the best bits of UK-style drop bar tourers (continental folk seem to prefer more upright steeds), gentle-stuff mountain bikes and road bikes, as follows:

    Tourer: frame, some geometry, gearing, wheels (700c), pedals, contact points excl. bars
    MTB: flat bars (shorter), v-brakes, changers
    Road: some geometry, elements of appearance

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • sarajoy
    sarajoy Posts: 1,675
    SecretSam wrote:
    If it's to be used as intended - ie city work, leisure, light touring maybe - then I'd say V-brakes and c.28c tyres are on the list. I'd want bar ends also, but agree on the width of the bars - my Sirrus has ludicrous bars, am going to take a hacksaw to them tomorrow!

    Guards and rack are probably in. Decent saddle. No suss, possibly suss seat pillar?

    What we're really talking about is something that nabs the best bits of UK-style drop bar tourers (continental folk seem to prefer more upright steeds), gentle-stuff mountain bikes and road bikes, as follows:

    Tourer: frame, some geometry, gearing, wheels (700c), pedals, contact points excl. bars
    MTB: flat bars (shorter), v-brakes, changers
    Road: some geometry, elements of appearance

    Agree, lopped a couple of inches off my own Vita bars. Tempted to take one or two more to make the position when I'm holding onto bar ends a little less splay-armed, but that'd probably compromise comfort when using the grips normally. Hmm.

    Nabbed the suss seat pillar off my old shopper. Very nice, just about kills some of the buzz from rougher roads, finally managed to tune it so that my normal weight doesn't compress it but it takes a bit of the shock out of lumps and bumps.
    4537512329_a78cc710e6_o.gif4537512331_ec1ef42fea_o.gif
  • FyPunK
    FyPunK Posts: 160
    First of all I take offence at being called a flower-powered-hippy-loving-anarchist-hybrid-loving-hybrid-lover, I ain't a hippy and have never trusted one :wink: Anarchist yes but not a hippy.
    Not sure :roll: I can't really compare to a roadie as I have never had one however I like mine coz its agile in traffic, has bar ends for hand comfort, SPD pedals, pannier rack for butties and shirt (don't do manbags), dull ninja colour, fitted faster 28 conti sports tyres, wasn't a stupid price, at weekends it needs to convert to a family bike (tag along is fitted) so we can enjoy our lovely British climate, and that is it for me, looking back the main reason I went for a hybrid was the tag-along, I really didn't fancy putting one on a full spec roadie.
    www.justgiving.com/aidyneal Cycling Manchester to Blackpool. Look out for number 1691
  • greg66_tri_v2.0
    greg66_tri_v2.0 Posts: 7,172
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    What qualities should a person consider when choosing a hybrid?

    1. Will it fit into a standard skip?
    2. Is it light enough to pick up so you can get it into the skip?
    3. Is it biodegradable?

    Points 2 and 3 are where most hybrids fall down, IMO. :twisted:
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
  • il_principe
    il_principe Posts: 9,155
    fnegroni wrote:
    IMHO:



    Disc brakes, which are WAY better than rim-brakes and are a MUST unless you are one of those people who think slowing down at the same rate as you accelerate is good enough. I certainly don't think so. In town, you want maximum grip from the brakes, and off road, you must be able to stop!

    2 words: Contact Patch.
  • lost_in_thought
    lost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    Will it hold its value for a quick resale? :P
  • prawny
    prawny Posts: 5,440
    Kind of OT but on a hybrid theme I saw an advert this morning for the new Lexus Full Hybrid car, eh Full Hybrid how does that work?

    Back on topic, I changed by brake pads this week for some aztecs, I wouldn't want anything more powerful than that in the dry thank you very much. Discs for dirt, rim brakes for roadies :D (although I possible would class winter roads as dirt)

    That ridgeback that stuey posted looks just about spot in for me for winter.
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
    Voodoo Bizango - 2014 - Dead - Hit by a car
    Vitus Sentier VRS - 2017
  • blu3cat
    blu3cat Posts: 1,016
    prawny wrote:
    Back on topic, I changed by brake pads this week for some aztecs, I wouldn't want anything more powerful than that in the dry thank you very much. Discs for dirt, rim brakes for roadies :D (although I possible would class winter roads as dirt)

    That ridgeback that stuey posted looks just about spot in for me for winter.

    +1

    Although White is not the best colour for winter - can you get dreary grey brown framed hybrids, with black / grey splash marks up the fork and seta tube?
    "Bed is for sleepy people.
    Let's get a kebab and go to a disco."

    FCN = 3 - 5
    Colnago World Cup 2
  • MrChuck
    MrChuck Posts: 1,663
    I like the Trek Soho stealth, fitted with mudguards it'd be almost spot on I think- except I'd prefer Vs to dual-pivots and some chunkier tires.
  • Physicsman
    Physicsman Posts: 12
    A good hyrbid clearly depends on the rider. For me it would be comfort over speed, then utility. So I have:

    1) suspension seat post
    2) springs on the saddle
    3) full mudguards with front and rear mudflaps
    4) rear rack for the pannier
    5) flat pedals
    6) good range of gears: front 26, 36, 48, rear 11-30.
  • Cafewanda
    Cafewanda Posts: 2,788
    Greg66 wrote:
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    What qualities should a person consider when choosing a hybrid?

    1. Will it fit into a standard skip?
    2. Is it light enough to pick up so you can get it into the skip?
    3. Is it biodegradable?

    Points 2 and 3 are where most hybrids fall down, IMO. :twisted:

    :P :P :P

    although mine is heavy or maybe I'm just a weakling :cry:
  • artaxerxes
    artaxerxes Posts: 612
    Actually, didn't Mark Beaumont ride a (very expensive) hybrid in his record breaking round the world cycle ride? I think it was a Koga Miyata with butterfly handlebars.
  • FyPunK
    FyPunK Posts: 160
    edited June 2009
    My Hybrid

    1) suspension seat post Yes, although I also have a solid one and can't tell the difference.
    2) springs on the saddle Nope, but it is a memory foam type one, very comfy.
    3) full mudguards with front and rear mudflaps nearly
    4) rear rack for the pannier Yep
    5) flat pedals Nope, hybrid, Shimano A530, spd one side and flat the other
    6) good range of gears: front 26, 36, 48, rear 11-30. 48,38,28 front and rear is 34-11 8speed

    Nearly your ideal bike then. :wink:
    www.justgiving.com/aidyneal Cycling Manchester to Blackpool. Look out for number 1691
  • fnegroni
    fnegroni Posts: 794
    soy_sauce wrote:
    fnegroni wrote:
    ......
    Infact, the best hybrid is a fully-rigid mountain bike with a road triple and slick tyres.

    +0.5

    cos a fork with lockout with give the rider a extra option.

    Agree, except it would have to be a really expensive one to be:
    a) light enough to not affect steering and handling
    b) with a proper lockout that does not budge.

    But Yes, a lockout feature would be better.
  • tardington
    tardington Posts: 1,379
    linoue wrote:
    Actually, didn't Mark Beaumont ride a (very expensive) hybrid in his record breaking round the world cycle ride? I think it was a Koga Miyata with butterfly handlebars.

    Yep, they look sweeet. My big sis has put butterfly bars on her cannondale tourer... However she's got one of the proper wimmen's edinburgh road bikes, and seems to be finding that fine.
  • Physicsman
    Physicsman Posts: 12
    FyPunK wrote:
    My Hybrid

    <snip>

    Nearly your ideal bike then. :wink:

    Or, your bike is almost the same as mine! :wink:
  • daviesee
    daviesee Posts: 6,386
    linoue wrote:
    Actually, didn't Mark Beaumont ride a (very expensive) hybrid in his record breaking round the world cycle ride? I think it was a Koga Miyata with butterfly handlebars.

    Here is a link to the full spec:-

    http://www.pedallingaround.com/equipment/?page_id=5
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • A Lion and a Tiger.
  • m0scs
    m0scs Posts: 196
    This is my Spec Epic MTB bastardised "hybrid." :oops:

    http://s974.photobucket.com/albums/ae22 ... 5346317055

    It aint pretty, but pretty practical and my only bike.

    Its got road slicks, lockable forks, wickedly powerful disk brakes. XT 48 tooth chainset, flatbars with bar ends.

    Its ok on the road and I have a spare set of wheels to swap out if I want to take it off road.

    .
    Specialised Epic MTB on slicks.
    SPD clipless pedals: FCN 7
  • _Brun_
    _Brun_ Posts: 1,740
    What function does the lettuce perform?