Strange looking calf warmers

GyatsoLa
GyatsoLa Posts: 667
edited June 2009 in Road buying advice
Oh, and another thing (to go with my other post about canti brakes I saw on some bikes yesterday).

On a cyclesportif I was on yesterday I noticed a few riders wearing strange looking warmers (or maybe compression garments). They were black, and covered the lower leg, stopping below the knee, making the riders look oddly like big hairy muscular japanese schoolgirls (oo-err). They seemed particularly popular with people with Triathlon type kit.

Just out of curiousity, anyone have any idea what they were, and what they are for? I find it hard to believe they are warmers, because the wearers left the knees exposed to the cold morning winds.

Comments

  • softlad
    softlad Posts: 3,513
    are you sure they weren't Japanese schoolgirls..??

    Seen plenty of track athletes wearing them - and it makes them look like schoolgirls too....
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    softlad wrote:
    are you sure they weren't Japanese schoolgirls..??

    Seen plenty of track athletes wearing them - and it makes them look like schoolgirls too....


    FWIW "Gyatsola" did mention triathletes wearing them. :wink:
  • Blonde
    Blonde Posts: 3,188
    Bet they didn't make 'em go any faster though... :lol:
    "All the gear, no idea" springs to mind. Funniest is when you're on cycling hol, and they pose around the hotel/bar after the ride, or even have dinner still wearing them, whilst I go shower and slip into something more, well, red-dressy and high heeled. What on earth are they thinking!!!
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Sounds like some more marketing bollocks to me. When the compression stuff was first invented it was only for post-exercise recovery. Clearly not a big enough market, so now it's being pushed into use during exercise with more pseudo-scientific benefits claimed.

    I'd rather stick with the image of red dress / high heels than giant, hairy Japanese schoolgirls.
  • GyatsoLa
    GyatsoLa Posts: 667
    Hey thanks bobzero, the 2XU 'calf guard and stirrup' is exactly what they were wearing! Bizarre bit of kit, but at least I know now it wasn't oxygen deprivation from trying to keep up with people far fitter than me that had me thinking of Japanese schoolgirls :oops:

    Dead right Blonde, its all part of the image. Actually, I thought some cyclists were bad for that, but I think triathletes seem to be far worse when it comes to the whole image thing, I can't believe how easily they buy into the psuedoscience. I bet some of them wear calf stirrups to bed :wink:

    Unless of course they do work, in which case thats the reason they were whizzing past me on the climbs.....
  • whyamihere
    whyamihere Posts: 7,708
    More proof that you can sell literally anything to triathletes...
  • jibberjim
    jibberjim Posts: 2,810
    They do work for lots of people in running at reducing muscle soreness post exercise. Given that triathletes need to run after biking, and they take a long time to put on, the triathlete needs to cycle (and swim) in them too. So you'll see them training in them too.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • jordan_217
    jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    I do Triathlons and even I cringe! AFAIK there isn't any real evidence to back-up the effectiveness of compression clothing. It maybe that people think they recover better when dressed like a Japanese schoolgirl :wink:

    I wonder if I'll see any blokes this season in two-piece Tri-kit (you know the one - womens sports bra and speedos!) and the compression socks - OOH ERR!
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • jibberjim
    jibberjim Posts: 2,810
    jordan_217 wrote:
    I do Triathlons and even I cringe! AFAIK there isn't any real evidence to back-up the effectiveness of compression clothing.

    There's a number of studies which have shown benefits even during exercise
    e.g.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19057400

    or in recovery
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15455235
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17365528

    The groups are of course small, and I would not therefore say the evidence is overwhelming, but along with the anecdotal evidence I do not agree it can be dismissed so easily as you do.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • jordan_217
    jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    jibberjim wrote:
    jordan_217 wrote:
    I do Triathlons and even I cringe! AFAIK there isn't any real evidence to back-up the effectiveness of compression clothing.

    There's a number of studies which have shown benefits even during exercise
    e.g.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19057400

    or in recovery
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15455235
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17365528

    The groups are of course small, and I would not therefore say the evidence is overwhelming, but along with the anecdotal evidence I do not agree it can be dismissed so easily as you do.

    Interesting articles. Thanks jibberjim. I'm still not going to give up my post session chocolate milkshake and malt loaf though. I suppose it's all about finding out what works best for you and implementing it, in both training and recovery.
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    That settles it. I'm quiting my job and going into full time "inventing" of triathlete "stuff".
    Not sure what my first product will be but I do have some really idiotic ideas that are sure to sell well in this niche market. Anyone want "in"? We'll make millions.
  • jordan_217
    jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    dennisn wrote:
    That settles it. I'm quiting my job and going into full time "inventing" of triathlete "stuff".
    Not sure what my first product will be but I do have some really idiotic ideas that are sure to sell well in this niche market. Anyone want "in"? We'll make millions.

    IMO - for your marketing campaign and product branding make sure to use words such as "Triathlon specific" and "Aero". Apparently this gives you the right to command a minimum 25% mark-up over similarly spec'd equipment from each of the individual disciplines.

    Don't get me wrong, I love triathlon and I love treating myself to shiny new kit. But why should Tri kit cost so much more than regular kit. And no, I'm not a slave to buying anything listed as "Triathlon specific"!
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    jordan_217 wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    That settles it. I'm quiting my job and going into full time "inventing" of triathlete "stuff".
    Not sure what my first product will be but I do have some really idiotic ideas that are sure to sell well in this niche market. Anyone want "in"? We'll make millions.

    IMO - for your marketing campaign and product branding make sure to use words such as "Triathlon specific" and "Aero". Apparently this gives you the right to command a minimum 25% mark-up over similarly spec'd equipment from each of the individual disciplines.

    Don't get me wrong, I love triathlon and I love treating myself to shiny new kit. But why should Tri kit cost so much more than regular kit. And no, I'm not a slave to buying anything listed as "Triathlon specific"!

    Great advice, thanks. Love the "triathlon specific" idea. I've got a place for you in marketing.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I am typing this with some "Tri-specific" carbon finger "aero" extensions. these have less drag when typing and allow me to work quicker on the mouse and back again with no fingertip fatigue. Send me a cheque Dennisn for about, ooh a lot of money and we can make it big. I will share all, my new Dubble-Aero compression hat, really Pointy-aero pedal design and crack-cocaine energy bar. You knows it.