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Do i lube the part of the hub that the casette goes on?

edited May 2009 in Workshop
I ordered some handbuilt Mavic OP wheels shimano hubs etc two days ago, when the wheels come do i lube the part of the hub which i am about to put the casette on?
cheers Jamie
Ribble Gran Fondo
Focus Black Hills
Raleigh Chopper

Posts

  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 5,669
    No, it slides on dry.
  • Oh i got a second hand pair of wheels a little while ago and thought the previous owner had lubed it, my bad. cheers
    Ribble Gran Fondo
    Focus Black Hills
    Raleigh Chopper
  • NuggsNuggs Posts: 1,804
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    No, it slides on dry.
    How wrong does that sound?


    And I don't mean factually incorrect.
  • Nuggs wrote:
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    No, it slides on dry.
    How wrong does that sound?


    And I don't mean factually incorrect.
    :lol::lol::lol:
    Ribble Gran Fondo
    Focus Black Hills
    Raleigh Chopper
  • WamasWamas Posts: 256
    Clean it first with some solvent, e.g. paraffin, and then dry it, then spread on some anti-sieze paste, then just slide it on and tighten it up.
    If you don't put the anti-sieze paste on, you might never be able to remove it again.
    The cassette and hub are probably made of different metals, so will start to bind together overtime otherwise.
  • gundersengundersen Posts: 586
    Clean it first with some solvent, e.g. paraffin, and then dry it, then spread on some anti-sieze paste, then just slide it on and tighten it up.
    If you don't put the anti-sieze paste on, you might never be able to remove it again.
    The cassette and hub are probably made of different metals, so will start to bind together overtime otherwise.

    personlly I would call that a waist of "anti-sieze"

    if you are scared that they will "sieze" then take them off and clean them once in a while.

    clean shiney things allways look good and don't ware us much
  • gundersengundersen Posts: 586
    Clean it first with some solvent, e.g. paraffin, and then dry it, then spread on some anti-sieze paste, then just slide it on and tighten it up.
    If you don't put the anti-sieze paste on, you might never be able to remove it again.
    The cassette and hub are probably made of different metals, so will start to bind together overtime otherwise.

    personlly I would call that a waist of "anti-sieze"

    if you are scared that they will "sieze" then take them off and clean them once in a while.

    clean shiney things allways look good and don't ware us much
  • peanutpeanut Posts: 1,373
    gundersen wrote:
    [

    personlly I would call that a waist of "anti-sieze"

    if you are scared that they will "sieze" then take them off and clean them once in a while.

    clean shiney things allways look good and don't ware us much

    personally I would use a spell check :roll: (just kiddin)

    A tiny smear of grease will prevent the freehub from rusting as the majority are steel. Only Dura Ace 10 speed and some specials are alloy as far as I am aware . Alloy freehubs are more likely to be damaged from the sprockets cutting grooves than galvanic oxidation I should have thought .
    I have never heard of a cassette becoming jammed on a freehub . The fit is so sloppy I should have thought it very unlikely.
  • pinkbikinipinkbikini Posts: 717
    peanut wrote:
    Alloy freehubs are more likely to be damaged from the sprockets cutting grooves than galvanic oxidation I should have thought .
    I have never heard of a cassette becoming jammed on a freehub . The fit is so sloppy I should have thought it very unlikely.

    Agreed. I used to use lithium grease on the freehub, now don't bother - no impact. I have had the cassette stuck on the freehub due to it cutting grooves as you mention though - no amount of grease would stop that, and it meant a trip to the LBS to use their vice and rubber mallet !
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