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PEE QUESTION

frogmanrnfrogmanrn Posts: 14
edited May 2009 in Road beginners
Hi, I am training for a century ride and doing 4+ hour rides at the moment, I am currently drinking 750ml of water or sports drink a hour but find im needing stop for a leak every hour or less which is frustrating and my pee is really clear is this to much?, how much does everyone else drink or need to stop to drain the main vein??

Thanks

Posts

  • guillianoguilliano Posts: 5,495
    Up to around 500ml is the norm per hour. Obviously drink more if you feel you need the fluids. Peeing a lot is just a sign you are drinking too much, but the clearness means you are passing mainly water so the good stuff from the sports drink is being absorbed. Try a slightly higher concentration, but take less on per hour and make sure you eat to take on carbs.
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    frogmanrn wrote:
    Hi, I am training for a century ride and doing 4+ hour rides at the moment, I am currently drinking 750ml of water or sports drink a hour but find im needing stop for a leak every hour or less which is frustrating and my pee is really clear is this to much?, how much does everyone else drink or need to stop to drain the main vein??

    Drink to thirst. Unless you ignore your thirst for a long while, thirst is the best way to judge how much water you need. Until you get way out of whack, your body knows what it needs.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    jibberjim wrote:
    frogmanrn wrote:
    Hi, I am training for a century ride and doing 4+ hour rides at the moment, I am currently drinking 750ml of water or sports drink a hour but find im needing stop for a leak every hour or less which is frustrating and my pee is really clear is this to much?, how much does everyone else drink or need to stop to drain the main vein??

    Drink to thirst. Unless you ignore your thirst for a long while, thirst is the best way to judge how much water you need. Until you get way out of whack, your body knows what it needs.

    If you wait to drink until you're thirsty and wait to eat until you're hungry you will probably
    end up dehydrated and bonked. Neither being much fun. I drink until I need to pee, then back off a bit. On really long rides I tend to eat something ever 20 miles or so. Do not wait until you're hungry. By then it's usually too late. I tend to drink bunches on hot days or at high altitude and if I have to stop to pee, so be it. Much better option than needing the Life Squad boys to fill you with an IV drip because you were dehydrated. And remember that
    if you suddenly stop sweating you may be in big trouble. Sure sign of dehydration. Drink
    up.

    Dennis Noward
  • markos1963markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    On sunday over 100 miles I drank 2 litres of fluids and pee'd only once so it worked out ok. You have to experiment to see what works for you. Having said that I probably under drank because afterwards i had, 750ml squash, 2x 330ml diet coke, 3 cups of tea, 3x 250ml water and I still didn't pee until the morning!
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    750ml every hour? I've done 100 miles on one 500ml bottle.

    I know us oldies probably used not to drink enough, but I do feel the pendulum has swung a ridiculous amount too far the other way. I still don't bother with anything at all unless I am out more than two hours.
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 7,960
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    750ml every hour? I've done 100 miles on one 500ml bottle.

    I know us oldies probably used not to drink enough, but I do feel the pendulum has swung a ridiculous amount too far the other way. I still don't bother with anything at all unless I am out more than two hours.

    Unless you were going REALLY slowly - that is WAY too little to drink. It will affect your performance and isn't good for your kidneys. I've ended up pissing out blood because I didn't drink enough on long rides.

    I used to drink a bottle an hour - now I drink a lot less. But 100 miles on 500ml is wrong. Don;t care what anyone says.
  • redddraggonredddraggon Posts: 10,862
    On solo non stop ride of 4-5hours I'll probably drink 1.5litres (2*750ml bottles) - I can always drink when I get home.

    If there's a cafe stop on a group ride of the same length I'll probably fill up the 750ml bottle that I've drunk, but I probably won't drink it all, so I'll have at most 2.25Litres (excluding what I drink in the cafe).

    It's never done me any harm. I've never experienced any ill effects.

    (I do however drink loads and loads and loads of water/liquids when I'm not riding, so when I start riding I'm already really well hydrated when I start.)
    I like bikes...

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  • Frank the tankFrank the tank Posts: 6,553
    I drink about 500ml/hour .

    Surely though, the amount of liquid taken on and water passed depends on a couple of factors:-

    How hard you're riding.
    The weather/temperature/wind speed.

    I find when riding steady I willl have to stop for a leak, but when riding hard I don't 'cos I'm sweating that much more.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • cookiemonstercookiemonster Posts: 668
    I had a similar problem - needing to stop fairly often. However i tend to sweat a fair bit and am a little prone to slight dehydration, so I'm a little paranoid about taking on enough water.

    I'm fairly settled now at 500ml/hour - fill the two 750ml bottles and aim to get through them at a fairly constant rate over 3 hours. One mistake I used to make was that the energy drinks (or just a malto/fructose/salt solution) tends to make my mouth feel a little dry - what I thought was thirst was just the sugary salty crappyness you get from SIS and the like. Also I had a tendency to take on water in big hits - 250ml every 30 minutes rather than spreading it out over the hour. I've found that drip-feeding (one mouthful every 10 minutes) means that I dont need to stop anywhere near as much as taking on a load of water every 30 or 40 minutes.

    jon
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    dennisn wrote:
    If you wait to drink until you're thirsty and wait to eat until you're hungry you will probably end up dehydrated and bonked.

    Hungry, perhaps, thirsty, very unlikely. All that "start drinking before your thirsty" advice has been pretty much debunked following the worrying number of deaths it caused amoung the running community.

    The body is extremely tuned to its need for water, and drinking more than required - ie not drinkking to thirst but drinking to some plan that says how much you should drink - risks over-hydration, which has just as many risks associated with it.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • rjh299rjh299 Posts: 721
    On my solo century i went through 7 750ml bottles of water and sports drink. Tipped a bit over my head but drank loads. I only had to go once during the ride. This was in 34c heat in NZ and i was sweating it all out. Kept myself topped up so didn't dehydrate, even if i wasn't that thirsty.
    Use your common sense and air on the side of caution but try cutting back the fluid a bit and see how you feel.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Yeah I think the 'drink before you are thirsty' thing was something from a study that a sports drink sponsored.

    I'll prob go through 1500ml on a Century - unless its really hot.

    If you look at marathon runners - they'll be working hard for 2 or 3 hours and take on very little fluid. The body can cope with working slightly dehydrated.

    The last guy to die in the London Marathon suffered from hyponatremia - he drank litres of water.

    Whats right for one person may not work for the next person.

    But clearly - if you are peeing loads - just drink less on the next ride and see how you get on ? Simples eh ?
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    cougie wrote:
    Yeah I think the 'drink before you are thirsty' thing was something from a study that a sports drink sponsored.

    The studies were based on weight loss, and an assumption that the weight lost was all water, and that weight loss was bad. Completely ignoring or forgetting about all the calories that were burnt to actually do the work. It's a very common statement, that is backed by many sports drinks sponsored statements.

    There's a the Sports Scientists review of the science here which is well worth a read.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    jibberjim wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    If you wait to drink until you're thirsty and wait to eat until you're hungry you will probably end up dehydrated and bonked.

    Hungry, perhaps, thirsty, very unlikely. All that "start drinking before your thirsty" advice has been pretty much debunked following the worrying number of deaths it caused amoung the running community.

    The body is extremely tuned to its need for water, and drinking more than required - ie not drinkking to thirst but drinking to some plan that says how much you should drink - risks over-hydration, which has just as many risks associated with it.

    I stand corrected, sort of, I think.You bring up good points.

    Dennis Noward
  • antflyantfly Posts: 3,276
    If your pee is clear and you are peeing a lot then you are drinking way too much.Your pee should be straw colour.I have about 200ml an hour this time of year.
    Smarter than the average bear.
  • Gav888Gav888 Posts: 946
    I did 50 on Sunday and drank about 400ml and hour, only peed once, and that was because I was waiting for a ferry and I was cold!! LOL

    400ml per hour seems average for me and or other runs I find I dont need to pee...
    Cycling never gets any easier, you just go faster - Greg LeMond
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    jibberjim wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    If you wait to drink until you're thirsty and wait to eat until you're hungry you will probably end up dehydrated and bonked.

    Hungry, perhaps, thirsty, very unlikely. All that "start drinking before your thirsty" advice has been pretty much debunked following the worrying number of deaths it caused amoung the running community.

    The body is extremely tuned to its need for water, and drinking more than required - ie not drinkking to thirst but drinking to some plan that says how much you should drink - risks over-hydration, which has just as many risks associated with it.

    I know what you're saying but just one question(sort of). If the body is "extremely
    tuned to it's need for water" why would any runner and or cyclist become dehydrated
    when water is readily available? Are they just not listening to their bodies cries for water? FWIW I have a friend who had to drop out of the Ironman because he was dehydrated, yet he told me that he never felt thirsty.

    Dennis Noward
  • jibberjimjibberjim Posts: 2,810
    dennisn wrote:
    I know what you're saying but just one question(sort of). If the body is "extremely tuned to it's need for water" why would any runner and or cyclist become dehydrated when water is readily available? Are they just not listening to their bodies cries for water? FWIW I have a friend who had to drop out of the Ironman because he was dehydrated, yet he told me that he never felt thirsty.

    Firstly I'd wonder how the dehydration conclusion was arrived at? It's a common catch all "diagnosis" for many failures in events, when the reality for the body refusing to continue more was something different (energy deficit or whatever)

    As I said before dehydration is often diagnosed from bodyweight reduction, but ignores the mass of the calories that are burnt during exercise, instead focusing on an equivalent amount of weight loss from an individual not exercising. The trap of comparing in exercise humans with humans at rest (if you're breathing fast, and your heart rate is 170 you may be very very sick, or you may just be cycling hard up a hill...)

    However, yes people do ignore thirst unfortunately - and in the ironman, they may well have the first 90 minutes or more of exercise unable to drink, and then live with that deficit, but still drinking to a "plan" that they worked out on training rides that didn't have the couple of hours of forced not drinking before it.

    Like anything, there are also people on the extremes who are less sensitive to thirst than is normal, maybe he is one of those. The athletes I know who've dehydrated enough to harm their performance, all ignored their thirst mechanism "Oh I'm feeling good, I don't want to slow down at this aid station to get a drink, I'll get it later".

    Also I do think that once you've gone beyond simple thirst, and are feeling really rough, your signals are confused and you start reaching out to all sorts of things, and start taking in other foods/drinks or whatever which then effect your bodies ability to absorb fluid, even as it's trying to rehydrate.

    It may be that drinking to thirst isn't quite right, you perhaps should drink a little more - but determining that more you would need to know more about the sweat rates etc. that is happening in an actual event, and likely be more individual. As I said above, the "drink more and replace your bodyweight" encouragement has led to more deaths than dehydration did before.
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • dg74dg74 Posts: 656
    dennisn wrote:
    jibberjim wrote:
    frogmanrn wrote:
    Hi, I am training for a century ride and doing 4+ hour rides at the moment, I am currently drinking 750ml of water or sports drink a hour but find im needing stop for a leak every hour or less which is frustrating and my pee is really clear is this to much?, how much does everyone else drink or need to stop to drain the main vein??

    Drink to thirst. Unless you ignore your thirst for a long while, thirst is the best way to judge how much water you need. Until you get way out of whack, your body knows what it needs.

    If you wait to drink until you're thirsty and wait to eat until you're hungry you will probably
    end up dehydrated and bonked
    . Neither being much fun. I drink until I need to pee, then back off a bit. On really long rides I tend to eat something ever 20 miles or so. Do not wait until you're hungry. By then it's usually too late. I tend to drink bunches on hot days or at high altitude and if I have to stop to pee, so be it. Much better option than needing the Life Squad boys to fill you with an IV drip because you were dehydrated. And remember that
    if you suddenly stop sweating you may be in big trouble. Sure sign of dehydration. Drink
    up.

    Dennis Noward

    Very, very true, as I found out to my expense last week. Never going out under prepared again. Never! :x :(
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    jibberjim wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    I know what you're saying but just one question(sort of). If the body is "extremely tuned to it's need for water" why would any runner and or cyclist become dehydrated when water is readily available? Are they just not listening to their bodies cries for water? FWIW I have a friend who had to drop out of the Ironman because he was dehydrated, yet he told me that he never felt thirsty.

    Firstly I'd wonder how the dehydration conclusion was arrived at? It's a common catch all "diagnosis" for many failures in events, when the reality for the body refusing to continue more was something different (energy deficit or whatever)

    His wife said his kidneys had shut down or had started to or were in the process of it.
    Something along those lines. And he had stopped sweating. He is, by his own admission, not really all that good at drinking enough or when he "should" and that's not good when it comes to a hot 10 or 12 hour affair. I do see your points though.

    Dennis Noward
  • fossyantfossyant Posts: 2,549
    Little and often, both food and energy drink if going long distances, especially if you want peak performance.

    I think I go through about 500ml an hour. 1 bottle 750ml is usually enough for about 35-40 miles for me. Over that, and especially hilly or hot rides it's two bottles, plus food.
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