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Suspension seat post on road bike?

Ian.BIan.B Posts: 732
edited May 2009 in Commuting chat
I was wondering if anyone uses a suspension seatpost on their road bike? Would it be a good idea for a dodgy back, or what would be the disadvantages? Any recommendations? Or would I be as well off with something like this, which has some sort of dampeners?
https://www.sigmasport.co.uk/app/secure/ProductDetails.aspx?FamilyID=749

Ian

Posts

  • lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    Depends what kind of bad back, I suppose.

    My initial reaction would be that if cycling is making it worse there are far more effective things to do than get a suspension seatpost - get the bike fully fitted being one.
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    I don't know that those seatposts make a vast amount of difference, over a normal carbon seatpost or a Ti post. I have one on my mtb and I can't tell any difference.

    The principle is relevant to back probs though - the original carbon rear-triangles on bikes were developed for a pro with back problems. I think the idea is that the sharp shocks through a stiff frame can cause muscles to spasm, blah. Hence, damp them out a little.

    Cane Creek do a full on suspension post. The brand "Use" do some good ones too. The down side is that the tube-in-tube ones are supposed to have some initial resistance, which kind of defeats the purpose for you. The Cane Creek one changes the effective setback of teh post slightly as it moves. They all change the saddle height, obviously.

    LiT is right that bike position is worth looking at first, although even a lot of pros use stock frame sizes, so custom isn't necessarly.... um.... necessary. I'm sure you know this, but there are also stretches/strengthening excersises that can help the body get used to the horror that is a cycling position.
  • lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    LiT is right that bike position is worth looking at first, although even a lot of pros use stock frame sizes, so custom isn't necessarly.... um.... necessary. I'm sure you know this, but there are also stretches/strengthening excersises that can help the body get used to the horror that is a cycling position.

    Erm yes, sorry, wasn't really expressing myself very clearly there! What I meant was take yourself and your bike to a decent bike shop and get them to fit it to you - adjusting stem height, bar angle, seat height, that sort of thing, even swapping out a stem for instance. A good fit should leave you with a set of measurements to take away and hopefully help with your back problems.

    There are various places that do that - where are you based?
  • AndyMancAndyManc Posts: 1,393
    Ian.B wrote:
    I was wondering if anyone uses a suspension seatpost on their road bike? Would it be a good idea for a dodgy back, or what would be the disadvantages? Any recommendations? Or would I be as well off with something like this, which has some sort of dampeners?
    https://www.sigmasport.co.uk/app/secure/ProductDetails.aspx?FamilyID=749

    Ian

    Ian, I've researched this issue a number of times, many people buy suss posts because of dodgy backs, the majority of people that have bought them swear by them.

    The posts take the knocks instead of your spine.

    BUT , there are a lot of censored ones out there that will seize or fall to bits within a year, you will have to spend a bit of money ( £50-£120) to get a decent one.

    I googled ,"Cycle/bike suspension seat posts reviews" , I read all the reviews and I narrowed my choice down to 2 .... this was last year, I didn't bother .... and I've forgotten which ones I picked :lol: , cane creek seems to ring a bell :roll:

    Never mind, something to keep you busy :wink:





    .
    Specialized Hardrock Pro/Trek FX 7.3 Hybrid/Specialized Enduro/Specialized Tri-Cross Sport
    URBAN_MANC.png
  • whyamiherewhyamihere Posts: 7,599
    Depends on the problems you have. If it's the small, high frequency vibrations that hurt you, then a suspension post won't really help much, as they aren't really supple enough to remove those vibrations (if they were, they'd be so soft you'd sag most of the way through the travel).
    If it's larger bumps causing you problems, then a suspension post may well help. It would be easier and cheaper to learn to stand up on the bike and use your legs to absorb the bumps though...
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    whyamihere wrote:
    Depends on the problems you have. If it's the small, high frequency vibrations that hurt you, then a suspension post won't really help much, as they aren't really supple enough to remove those vibrations (if they were, they'd be so soft you'd sag most of the way through the travel).
    If it's larger bumps causing you problems, then a suspension post may well help. It would be easier and cheaper to learn to stand up on the bike and use your legs to absorb the bumps though...

    This has not been my experience. Do you actually have a suspension seat post? They are very effective indeed. They are adjustable to match your weight and the comfort you desire. They not only cushion you against being battered by larger bumps AND smaller vibration but they also reduce problems down under in the nether regions as well meaning you can ride for longer and further without discomfort. If I go out on my road training bike without putting the suspension seat post on after 70 miles I'm walking like a crab on hot stones, whereas 75-80 miles with it fitted is a breeze. I currently have a KF silver finish one but need another as I have several bikes. I'm looking at USE as they seem to get the best write ups and hype.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    dilemna wrote:
    whyamihere wrote:
    Depends on the problems you have. If it's the small, high frequency vibrations that hurt you, then a suspension post won't really help much, as they aren't really supple enough to remove those vibrations (if they were, they'd be so soft you'd sag most of the way through the travel).
    If it's larger bumps causing you problems, then a suspension post may well help. It would be easier and cheaper to learn to stand up on the bike and use your legs to absorb the bumps though...

    This has not been my experience. Do you actually have a suspension seat post? They are very effective indeed. They are adjustable to match your weight and the comfort you desire. They not only cushion you against being battered by larger bumps AND smaller vibration but they also reduce problems down under in the nether regions as well meaning you can ride for longer and further without discomfort. If I go out on my road training bike without putting the suspension seat post on after 70 miles I'm walking like a crab on hot stones, whereas 75-80 miles with it fitted is a breeze. I currently have a KF silver finish one but need another as I have several bikes. I'm looking at USE as they seem to get the best write ups and hype.

    tbh if you're having problems then it's down to poor set up and/or the wrong saddle. When I first got my weekend bike, I doggedly stuck with the saddle it came with and it killed me on a 100 mile ride. I had numb plumbs for nearly two days :shock: Now I've swapped to the saddle on my commuter I can do 100 miles plus with no problems at all, in fact this weekend I spent over 7 hours in the saddle and came away without any soreness at all.
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

    Revised FCN - 2
  • sarajoysarajoy Posts: 1,675
    I have one on my bike.

    It ain't a full on roadie but it's moreso than a standard hybrid.

    ANYWAY there are still the odd unavoidable bits of nasty road which are just plain rough, or with potholes / badly-filled cabling-troughs right across the road. Sometimes I forget and end up flying over them with bum still on saddle.

    Two things I got to make myself more comfortable:
    - a couple of strong sports bras!
    - a seat post with some suspension (stolen from my old sit-up-and-beg)

    It's taken me a while to get the seat-post adjustment right, but I think I've /just/ hit it. The rough bits are no longer so vibratey, and the surprise potholes no longer leave me with a black eye..!

    Will try one final adjustment in the softer direction just to give it a go, but I suspect too much further and the seat post will start to squish as I sit on it, or bounce me up and down too much.
    4537512329_a78cc710e6_o.gif4537512331_ec1ef42fea_o.gif
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    Rich158 wrote:
    dilemna wrote:
    whyamihere wrote:
    Depends on the problems you have. If it's the small, high frequency vibrations that hurt you, then a suspension post won't really help much, as they aren't really supple enough to remove those vibrations (if they were, they'd be so soft you'd sag most of the way through the travel).
    If it's larger bumps causing you problems, then a suspension post may well help. It would be easier and cheaper to learn to stand up on the bike and use your legs to absorb the bumps though...

    This has not been my experience. Do you actually have a suspension seat post? They are very effective indeed. They are adjustable to match your weight and the comfort you desire. They not only cushion you against being battered by larger bumps AND smaller vibration but they also reduce problems down under in the nether regions as well meaning you can ride for longer and further without discomfort. If I go out on my road training bike without putting the suspension seat post on after 70 miles I'm walking like a crab on hot stones, whereas 75-80 miles with it fitted is a breeze. I currently have a KF silver finish one but need another as I have several bikes. I'm looking at USE as they seem to get the best write ups and hype.

    tbh if you're having problems then it's down to poor set up and/or the wrong saddle. When I first got my weekend bike, I doggedly stuck with the saddle it came with and it killed me on a 100 mile ride. I had numb plumbs for nearly two days :shock: Now I've swapped to the saddle on my commuter I can do 100 miles plus with no problems at all, in fact this weekend I spent over 7 hours in the saddle and came away without any soreness at all.

    Rich158 I don't know who you are specifically directing your post/rant at but I don't have problems. Too much info regarding your plums though.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • antflyantfly Posts: 3,276
    Ian.B wrote:
    I was wondering if anyone uses a suspension seatpost on their road bike? Would it be a good idea for a dodgy back, or what would be the disadvantages? Any recommendations? Or would I be as well off with something like this, which has some sort of dampeners?
    https://www.sigmasport.co.uk/app/secure/ProductDetails.aspx?FamilyID=749

    Ian
    I put one of those on my aluminium bike recently and it definitely made it more comfortable on longer rides and bumpy roads.I would say get one.
    Smarter than the average bear.
  • Chaz.HardingChaz.Harding Posts: 3,144
    sarajoy wrote:
    the surprise potholes no longer leave me with a black eye..!

    :lol::wink:

    Alot of it, as said above, is about posistion on the bike. If you get properly fitted and adjusted, then you'll maximise comfort (and performance too!!!).
    Boo-yah mofo
    Sick to the power of rad
    Fix it 'till it's broke
  • FyPunKFyPunK Posts: 160
    For what it is worth I personally don't find any difference between the two, I use the sus post everyday on my hybrid, at weekends I change to a non sus post as this has the bracket for the the tag-a-long, often we will do 20+ miles with the little one in tow. Both feel the same to me but like a lot things in life its all subjective.
    www.justgiving.com/aidyneal Cycling Manchester to Blackpool. Look out for number 1691
  • Ian.BIan.B Posts: 732
    Thanks for your comments everyone!
    Ian
  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    dilemna wrote:
    Rich158 wrote:
    dilemna wrote:
    whyamihere wrote:
    Depends on the problems you have. If it's the small, high frequency vibrations that hurt you, then a suspension post won't really help much, as they aren't really supple enough to remove those vibrations (if they were, they'd be so soft you'd sag most of the way through the travel).
    If it's larger bumps causing you problems, then a suspension post may well help. It would be easier and cheaper to learn to stand up on the bike and use your legs to absorb the bumps though...

    This has not been my experience. Do you actually have a suspension seat post? They are very effective indeed. They are adjustable to match your weight and the comfort you desire. They not only cushion you against being battered by larger bumps AND smaller vibration but they also reduce problems down under in the nether regions as well meaning you can ride for longer and further without discomfort. If I go out on my road training bike without putting the suspension seat post on after 70 miles I'm walking like a crab on hot stones, whereas 75-80 miles with it fitted is a breeze. I currently have a KF silver finish one but need another as I have several bikes. I'm looking at USE as they seem to get the best write ups and hype.

    tbh if you're having problems then it's down to poor set up and/or the wrong saddle. When I first got my weekend bike, I doggedly stuck with the saddle it came with and it killed me on a 100 mile ride. I had numb plumbs for nearly two days :shock: Now I've swapped to the saddle on my commuter I can do 100 miles plus with no problems at all, in fact this weekend I spent over 7 hours in the saddle and came away without any soreness at all.

    Rich158 I don't know who you are specifically directing your post/rant at but I don't have problems. Too much info regarding your plums though.

    I'm not quite sure I'd call it a rant. I was merely making the point that a suspension seatpost is not a quick fix for a poorly set up bike and the wrong saddle. Get the bike set up correctly, and the right saddle for you, and then if you're still having problems by all means consider a suspension seatpost for a bit of extra comfort, but using it to mask problems rather than solving them could actually do you more damage in the long term.

    Believe me I could have gone into far more detail about the state of my nether regions after 100 miles on that saddle, but modesty forbids
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

    Revised FCN - 2
  • sarajoysarajoy Posts: 1,675
    I'm not sure the most correctly set up bike in the world would nullify vibrations from unusually rough roads, or reduce the ka-bounce-ow! you get from surprise lumps, bumps and potholes.
    4537512329_a78cc710e6_o.gif4537512331_ec1ef42fea_o.gif
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    antfly wrote:
    Ian.B wrote:
    I was wondering if anyone uses a suspension seatpost on their road bike? Would it be a good idea for a dodgy back, or what would be the disadvantages? Any recommendations? Or would I be as well off with something like this, which has some sort of dampeners?
    https://www.sigmasport.co.uk/app/secure/ProductDetails.aspx?FamilyID=749

    Ian
    I put one of those on my aluminium bike recently and it definitely made it more comfortable on longer rides and bumpy roads.I would say get one.

    I wouldn't have thought it offers the came cushioning as a decent suspension seat post. It might be the next piece of must have pro kit but not for me I'm afraid an everyday plodder.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • antflyantfly Posts: 3,276
    It`s not a sus post but it`s better than a normal alloy post and only about £50 for the heavier one.I had a cheap sus post on my mtb,until it broke,and it made a difference,I agree,but I don`t want one on my road bike.
    Smarter than the average bear.
  • lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    sarajoy wrote:
    I'm not sure the most correctly set up bike in the world would nullify vibrations from unusually rough roads, or reduce the ka-bounce-ow! you get from surprise lumps, bumps and potholes.

    The thing I find is that after a bit of practice I now automatically transfer my weight to my feet and away from my bum when I see bumps coming, or the very second the front wheel hits something lumpy.

    Whether a suspension seatpost would be just as effective as doing that I don't know, but in the meantime I'm going to stay in the 'get the bike correctly fitted' camp.
  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    sarajoy wrote:
    I'm not sure the most correctly set up bike in the world would nullify vibrations from unusually rough roads, or reduce the ka-bounce-ow! you get from surprise lumps, bumps and potholes.

    The thing I find is that after a bit of practice I now automatically transfer my weight to my feet and away from my bum when I see bumps coming, or the very second the front wheel hits something lumpy.

    Whether a suspension seatpost would be just as effective as doing that I don't know, but in the meantime I'm going to stay in the 'get the bike correctly fitted' camp.

    +1

    Learning to adapt your body position to take into account road surface etc is all part of learning to ride a bike, and ultimately you'll be a better, safer rider for it.
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

    Revised FCN - 2
  • sarajoysarajoy Posts: 1,675
    I said surprise lumps and bumps.

    Clearly when I see them coming, I also adjust my position.

    Also the very rough patches of road (old tarmac where all the hard large stones have remained and the rest eroded down) are much much smoother with a little bit of suspension.
    4537512329_a78cc710e6_o.gif4537512331_ec1ef42fea_o.gif
  • lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    sarajoy wrote:
    I said surprise lumps and bumps.

    Clearly when I see them coming, I also adjust my position.

    Also the very rough patches of road (old tarmac where all the hard large stones have remained and the rest eroded down) are much much smoother with a little bit of suspension.

    I know... that's why I said
    The thing I find is that after a bit of practice I now automatically transfer my weight to my feet and away from my bum when I see bumps coming, or the very second the front wheel hits something lumpy.
  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    sarajoy wrote:
    I said surprise lumps and bumps.

    Clearly when I see them coming, I also adjust my position.

    Also the very rough patches of road (old tarmac where all the hard large stones have remained and the rest eroded down) are much much smoother with a little bit of suspension.

    In my experience there are very few surprise lumps and bumps, although they do exist. That's where the ability to ride 'softly' comes in, if you're ready to adjust your body position at a moments notice you can generally soak up any bump as LiT says.

    I do agree however that they'll take the sting out of a really rough road surface, after all that's what they were designed for, albeit for mountain bikes rather than road use.
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

    Revised FCN - 2
  • sarajoysarajoy Posts: 1,675
    Blimey you lot like to make your point eh!

    My point:
    I have a suspended seat post, which I find very useful, not being the absolute perfect cyclist.

    Maybe one day I'll decide I don't need it any more, but for now it offers me more comfort when occasionally I am a tiny wee bit surprised by something lumpy under my wheels.

    Surely this is allowed? And I am entirely sure my bike fits me, after myriad adjustments.
    4537512329_a78cc710e6_o.gif4537512331_ec1ef42fea_o.gif
  • antflyantfly Posts: 3,276
    I fully support your right to sit on anything you like.
    Smarter than the average bear.
  • AndyMancAndyManc Posts: 1,393
    Rich158 wrote:

    In my experience there are very few surprise lumps and bumps, although they do exist. That's where the ability to ride 'softly' comes in,

    Those with lower back problem will often have difficulty with muscle control, tensing leg muscles to cushion poor road surfaces can often lead to lower back muscle spasms.

    Back problems are the biggest cause of absenteeism, many cyclists with the condition will often find the only thing they can do is turn the pedals, 'riding light' is often not an option.

    Everyone (and it will affect most people at some stage) that has lower (or upper) back problems will appreciate the situation.



    .
    Specialized Hardrock Pro/Trek FX 7.3 Hybrid/Specialized Enduro/Specialized Tri-Cross Sport
    URBAN_MANC.png
  • roger_merrimanroger_merriman Posts: 6,165
    sarajoy wrote:
    Blimey you lot like to make your point eh!

    My point:
    I have a suspended seat post, which I find very useful, not being the absolute perfect cyclist.

    Maybe one day I'll decide I don't need it any more, but for now it offers me more comfort when occasionally I am a tiny wee bit surprised by something lumpy under my wheels.

    Surely this is allowed? And I am entirely sure my bike fits me, after myriad adjustments.

    i find i am more likely to crash though things on the big hybrid than when out for a spin on old red. thats more that it's a work horse so i don't treat it with kindness and sometimes i want to hold a line though traffic that on a roadie i'd probably go around than though. this said i've years as a muddy rocky MTB sort of folk so going light etc is wired in for me.

    and yes your allowed much like the pants thingy.
  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    I could go on for a fair bit longer Sarajoy :roll: but I'll save your boredom and shut up now :wink:
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

    Revised FCN - 2
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