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22 Stone!

bigbonedbigboned Posts: 151
edited June 2009 in MTB beginners
Hi All, Barry here, been a lurker for a while but i need to post so here we are

Im currently in process of loosing 7 stone in weight ( im 22 st at 6'2")- diet etc and working out coming along nicely but ive been wanting to get back in the saddle for a while now

i used to ride alot but that was 15 years ago before i found beer and pies etc oh and cars
im wanting to tackle the 5 mile commute on road but also the local forest at weekend - nothing too demanding cos like i said im a big lad altho my cadio isnt bad for my size

im thinking hardtail - mainly for stregth , weight carrying ability etc as opposed to a FBR / hybrid - i understand the difference in efficiency of both etc and i suppose in ideal world i have several bikes - but for now the funds are for one

2nd dilemma in in ireland and work have signed up to halfords cycle to work thing so i want to avail of this rather than going outside - i dont want this to be an anti- halfords thread as that dosnt interest me im more concerned about the bike choices available to me

basically Boardman, Kona,GT, Saracen and carerra - budget apx €700 / £ 500 but could be pushed.
do i buy cheaper end and eventually replace or better and upgrade - like i said i used to ride alot ( marin's in the day) so i doubt it will be a fad thing

opinions, thoughts on a postcard etc etc - am i mad should i stick to swimming?

cheers
Baz
For the muddy - Boardman comp frame ( to match the roadie) running saint/ fox
For the blacktop - Boardman Pro Carbon

'Currently listening to Motley Crue's Girls Girls Girls'
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  • go for a boardman, you get some very good kit for your cash, GT and Kona are good bikes though Kona can be a bit underspecced but the frames are awesome,
    i spent all me money on whisky and beer!!!
  • only problem with the boardmans is that they are quite lightweight. May be a bit of a problem with your weight (no offence obviously).

    I think the Kona Hoss would be worth a look at.
    Kona Clydesdale bike are designed for riders whose stature demands more from their bike. Built tough like an OB hardtail with cross country geometry.
  • BoardinBobBoardinBob Posts: 697
    Welcome to the forum. :D

    First, don't worry about having to deal with Halfords. You're not limited to the bikes they usually stock and they can source pretty much any bike for you. I got a Specialized through them in January. You may have problems trying to get a Cannondale or Trek but they may direct you to a local dealer that accepts Halfords vouchers.

    Second, you're right to be looking at hardtails at the price point your considering. You'll be getting more for your money. IIRC the Kona Hoss was rated highly in the mags last year in a test of bike for us bigger guys (I'm the wrong side of 15 stone :lol: )

    http://www.tredz.co.uk/.Kona-Hoss-Mount ... _20449.htm

    I also like the Marin Nail Trail. It's quite a bit higher than your budget but it's a tough, strong bike

    http://www.rutlandcycling.com/10992/Mar ... n=pid10992



    If you're looking to lose weight then slow and steady is the key. Better to do a 3 hour ride at a slow pace where you're not even out of breath than a hard one hour ride where you gasping for air!
  • bigbonedbigboned Posts: 151
    WOW thanks for the quick replies lads, my prob with range is that im ROI so halfords cant order me there special order brands just stock carried ones - i looked at the hoss and it made sense but its €1300 here - so too steep right now im afraid

    i was feeling the boardman comp and pro? anyone any opinions on componentry, are the wheels strong?
    For the muddy - Boardman comp frame ( to match the roadie) running saint/ fox
    For the blacktop - Boardman Pro Carbon

    'Currently listening to Motley Crue's Girls Girls Girls'
  • Chris5.5Chris5.5 Posts: 154
    I weigh 18 stone and bought the Fury, very well built and had no issues with it.

    Chris
  • aye, fury has a nice strong frame.
    also the GT Aggressor is quite burly.
  • Budget for getting the spring changed in your fork. I had a Judy 2.5 when I was 18.5 stones, changing the spring made a hell of a difference. Before the switch the front would dive a lot under sudden braking.
    Northwind wrote: It's like I covered it in superglue and rode it through ebay.
  • BoardinBob wrote:
    I also like the Marin Nail Trail. It's quite a bit higher than your budget but it's a tough, strong bike

    http://www.rutlandcycling.com/10992/Mar ... n=pid10992
    !

    I bought this and I'm just over 18 stone. In just 5-6 weeks of riding every other day or every couple of days, I've just rode 5 times in the last 7 days and feel much better than I did. I actually tackled a smallish ascent yesterday which I puffed up first time & had to walk partly and I was amazed how smoothly I got up it. It's a great bike, strong frame, strong forks etc. My biggest problem (which I think is a problem) is that you might need stronger rotors for the brakes. Aside from that I'm loving the feel of it.
    Start Weight 18st 13lbs March 2009
    17st 10lbs August 2009
    17st 4lbs October 2009
    15st 12lbs December 2010

    Final planned weight 12st 7lbs
  • most frames will take your weight providing your not hitting jumps and keep the bike relatively on the ground, might need a heavier spring in the fork just to give you better use of the it, but apart from that you should be ok.
    Remember if your using the bike your not going to stay 22 stone for long so take this into account, i was kicking the censored out of 22 stone when i got a gary fisher wahoo 3 years ago, it lasted me fine until i upgraded, that bike wasnt strictly intended for heavier guys but it done the job.
    ask about weight limits and stuff when you go check out the bikes
    i spent all me money on whisky and beer!!!
  • bramstokerbramstoker Posts: 250
    I have just had exactly the same problem as you, at 22 stone i would advise you to get a rigid hybrid and if the weight loss goes well put bouncy forks on at a later date if you feel you must have them. Im a similar weight and every bike i tried no matter how good the quality was, the forks sagged almost to bottoming out when just sitting on them.
    People will say "lock them out" or "pump them up harder" but if you have them locked out all the time you may as well have gone rigid in the first place and got a better quality of bike for your money.
    Its amazing the extra quality of thel parts you would get on your new bike when a large percentage of the price isnt tied up in redundant bouncy bits.
    A feather is kinky, a whole chicken is just perverse.
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 15,475
    rhBDS10.jpg

    I'd say the Fury is probably going to make more sense than the Boardman range, those really are better bikes but the Fury's burlier, and still a very good bike in its own right. Stronger wheels, fairly stiff frame, etc. The Boardman range are much more weight conscious. As someone else said, you might want to budget for a replacement spring in the forks of whatever you get- bearing in mind here that a good fork working right doesn't just make it easier and nicer to ride, it also takes some of the strain off the bike. You're far from the biggest guy ever to jump back on a bike tbh.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • edhornbyedhornby Posts: 1,780
    I've got a current model fury and it's really good for the money, not a skinny racer like the boardman so probably a better bet

    the only thing I'd recommed a change of is probably the saddle - although it's a very personal thing, the one that it comes with is very flat and wide so not very comfortable imo

    if you do get the springs changed, I wouldn't give it to halfords to do - they can do the straightforward stuff but I would give it to a specialist to sort a fork
    "I get paid to make other people suffer on my wheel, how good is that"
    --Jens Voight
  • passoutpassout Posts: 4,609
    I'd say any of those except the Boardman - too lightweight for my liking and I'm around 13 stone. Kona and GT generally ride nicely.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • bigbonedbigboned Posts: 151
    all good stuff lads - thanks very much, looks like my basic thoughts of hard tail were right, i suppose next up is make a short list, is there any particular components i should compromise with or shouldnt have - for example can the spring be changed in ALL forks that im likely to end up with ? whats opinions on discs - hydraulic everytime? - will i get a decent set for my money or should i stay with cable and put the extra cash into a diff. component? - in otherwords where should i spend my money other than frame
    i notice all the konas for example are all cable discs until i spend big wheras not so with the fury?
    shimano min. spec is what? are Sram better

    thanks again for taking the time with a noob
    For the muddy - Boardman comp frame ( to match the roadie) running saint/ fox
    For the blacktop - Boardman Pro Carbon

    'Currently listening to Motley Crue's Girls Girls Girls'
  • I would point out 700 euros is a lot closer to 700 pounds than it ever used to be!
    Start Weight 18st 13lbs March 2009
    17st 10lbs August 2009
    17st 4lbs October 2009
    15st 12lbs December 2010

    Final planned weight 12st 7lbs
  • Chris5.5Chris5.5 Posts: 154
    The forks on the Fury cost something like £200 on their own, they are very good. A stiffer spring will probably cost about £30 plus fitting. Tora's are much better than the darts you usually see at this price.

    The SRAM gears are very good, easily a match for Shimano, maybe not as smooth to change gear but need far less fettling to keep them indexed.

    For your weight I would recommend hydraulics everytime, the Tektros fitted to the Fury always stopped me easily and are powerfull. I have bought a new bike since the Fury and now have Juicy 5's, the Tektro's were just as good.

    The only negatve point for me on the Fury were the tyres when paired with the Sun Wheel rims, very hard to get off. I swapped the tyres for Panaracer Cinders which cost about £30 for the pair. They went on and came off nice and easy.

    Chris
  • EranuEranu Posts: 712
    Any of those bikes will be fine. I was 21 stone when I got my Cube last year, which is lighter than the Boardman, and I've had no issues at all. If you go cheaper you will get cheaper components which, in my experience, don't last as long or as well.
  • bigbonedbigboned Posts: 151
    Can i ask how you find it in the saddle at 21 st. ? - have to say i think your tube looks gorgeous

    whats the deal with bar ends these days? almost seems to be a hybrid thing now - do i take it people dont go uphill on MTB's now?

    going to try a couple of bikes out today - seems the fury gets a lot of votes!

    is there any components i should stay clear of during the inevitable sales pitch?
    For the muddy - Boardman comp frame ( to match the roadie) running saint/ fox
    For the blacktop - Boardman Pro Carbon

    'Currently listening to Motley Crue's Girls Girls Girls'
  • weeksy59weeksy59 Posts: 2,606
    bigboned wrote:
    Can i ask how you find it in the saddle at 21 st. ? - have to say i think your tube looks gorgeous

    whats the deal with bar ends these days? almost seems to be a hybrid thing now - do i take it people dont go uphill on MTB's now?

    going to try a couple of bikes out today - seems the fury gets a lot of votes!

    is there any components i should stay clear of during the inevitable sales pitch?

    1. You have plenty of padding on your censored ;)

    2. BAr ends.. weird one but they have gone out of fashion a lot. PArtly because of high ride bars too. I go uphills and do prefer bar-ends, but tehy're not essential.

    3. Accept that some of your components will be budget... don't buy anything... come back and ask the knowledgable folk here.
  • BeardfaceBeardface Posts: 5,495
    Bigboned.. welcome back to biking! :)

    My 2 cents as such.. I've just helped a mate who weighs in at 21st buy his first bike.. (he hasn't exercised for years, and hadn't ridden a bike since he was a kid.. he's now 33, so had a budget of around £350).

    I took him to Halfords, as I know GT's to be nice and strong.. after looking around for a while, and a little bit of encouragement, he decided that spending a little bit more would get him much better kit, and he finally went with this:

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... yId_165499

    Thats well within your price range, and from halfords, so the CTW scheme is still on for you.. personally I think its got great kit on for the price as well, and it looks amazing.. (20% off helps as well!)

    Anyway, he's now been out with me and a few mates on small xc rides for 3 weekends, and he has nothing but good things to say about the choice he made, he says it feels so stable underneath him, which he was very impressed about because of a) his weight, and b)the fact he's not ridden a bike for years..

    Just thought I'd mention his experience as it seems to be quite similar to yours mate.. good luck with whatever you choose though!
  • Mark\' 62Mark\' 62 Posts: 40
    Hi Barry, one of me mates was 19st and bought the GTagressor xc2 the same bike as ive got, in 12 months he lost 5st and the bike was great for him he had no problems at all now that he's fitter (and lighter :lol: ) he's just upgraded to a trek and give the GT to one of the lads and it's still going strong :wink:
    growing old is compulsory

    growing up is optional
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 15,475
    Bar ends were deemed unfashionable a few years back and are now an offence punishable by death :roll: Partly though, wider riser bars make them less useful, I couldn't have lived without them in the old days but I don't miss them much with modern bars.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • baba123baba123 Posts: 235
    mongoose amasa elite 08 for £420 it has great spec for the price ecspecially the fork
    mongoose amasa elite 08
    giant anthem x4 10
  • I was in a similar position a while back. I got a GT Avalanche 1.0 - which is pretty much the same frame as the GT Agressors in most Halford branches. I think it's great - I started off pretty gently with it but now I'm hitting drops & jumps with a big grin. Nothing has ever broken on mine - I just wear stuff out and then upgrade them to lighter stuff. I'm not too sure of the current specs but two things to consider may be-
    - how compressed the fork will be with you and your gear on board. Some form of preload adjustment or compression damping might be useful.
    - You'll probably want to change the tyres to something more commute friendly - with some tread for the weekends off road.
  • EranuEranu Posts: 712
    Can i ask how you find it in the saddle at 21 st. ? - have to say i think your tube looks gorgeous

    I'm not 21 stone now :) 17..5 as of this morning. If you mean did I struggle at 21 stone to ride, then not really. I just took it easy, didn't try and do massive rides just kept it easy. My view was there is no point trying to go out and do huge hills and epics rides whilst being so unfit. I started off doing 30 mins or so then built it up from there.

    Thank for the compliment on the Cube :)
  • bigbonedbigboned Posts: 151
    Fair play to you dropping the weight! - just a bit nervous/ anxious i guess cant be this size and not be abit self conscious still ive suffered abuse for being ginger for 36 years lol

    why dont halfords sell cube lol - dont answer that!

    thanks again everyone for taking the time on what is obviously a very repeated thread deffo a nice bunch on here
    cheers, keep it coming
    For the muddy - Boardman comp frame ( to match the roadie) running saint/ fox
    For the blacktop - Boardman Pro Carbon

    'Currently listening to Motley Crue's Girls Girls Girls'
  • EranuEranu Posts: 712
    Don't worry about it, the main thing is you're trying to do something about about it. You can work on being ginger afterwards ;)

    I would look at the Boardmans too, great looking bikes imo.
  • when you get your bike dont go out and beast yourself in an effort to lose weight, make sure your having fun otherwise you'll lose interest. also if you get muddy while out folk will forget your ginger
    i spent all me money on whisky and beer!!!
  • bigbonedbigboned Posts: 151
    also if you get muddy while out folk will forget your ginger

    Hahahaha superb!!

    RE: boardman - is the team worth the difference from the Comp - ie. Reba SL and avid elixir - obviously i know nothin..... - i heard the reba talked about in dark corners - would it be worth changing rotors to nearer 200 whatever i finally decide on considering my god like physique ( buddha)
    For the muddy - Boardman comp frame ( to match the roadie) running saint/ fox
    For the blacktop - Boardman Pro Carbon

    'Currently listening to Motley Crue's Girls Girls Girls'
  • EranuEranu Posts: 712
    If you can afford it then go for it.
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