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MTB Hardtail with road gears

superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
edited April 2009 in Commuting chat
I'm looking to change jobs soon and there could be a chance that i won't be able to cycle to work.
However I still need a new bike. I thought if I got a MTB I could at least use this for the weekend jaunts with the wife round the lake district.
With that in mind I would like to look at getting a MTB that i can put slicks on. My current bike is just like this but it's on it's last legs and (frankly) is rubblish!
Does anyone know of a hardtail MTB that has road gearing, as this is the main gripe with my current bike - just not enough speed.

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • snookssnooks Posts: 1,521
    Get a bigger chain ring at the front...I did and it make a hell of a difference...I wend for 48, and it works for me :)
    FCN:5, 8 & 9
    If I'm not riding I'm shooting http://grahamsnook.com
    THE Game
    Watch out for HGVs
  • superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
    How much did that cost you?
    My current bike needs the whole drive train replacing and I honestly am sick of it big weighty uselessness. I def need a new bike, but if its cheap ebough just to add a bigger ring (fnar fnar) I'd be willing to do that.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    just take care that a road crankset can foul you chainstays.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
    Sorry, absolute bike novice. What's that mean?
  • fossyantfossyant Posts: 2,549
    If you buy a MTB, just get a close ratio road cassette for it (i.e. rear sprockets) - might cost you an extra £40, plus you'll need a Hyperglide tool and chain whip. £60 all in max, and you'll still have the MTB cassette.
  • nationnation Posts: 609
    superdry wrote:
    Sorry, absolute bike novice. What's that mean?

    If you fit a set of road bike cranks (the bits that have the pedals attached that you turn) to your MTB you may find that they won't fit because the chainstays (the lower of the two pairs of frame tubes that connect to the rear wheel axle) are in the way of the chainrings (the large cogs attached to the cranks).

    I wouldn't think a whole new set of cranks would be necessary, though. You can replace individual chainrings on all but the very cheapest cranksets. They're measured by the number of teeth they have, so 44T is 44 teeth, and 48T has 48 teeth. The more teeth, the higher the gear.
  • snookssnooks Posts: 1,521
    superdry wrote:
    How much did that cost you?
    My current bike needs the whole drive train replacing and I honestly am sick of it big weighty uselessness. I def need a new bike, but if its cheap ebough just to add a bigger ring (fnar fnar) I'd be willing to do that.

    My whole crank was bent so I had to replace the whole thing. I don't have the tools so I got my LBS (local bike shop) to fit it...cost around £70 all in

    Oh and remember you'll prolly need a longer chain, but if your drive train is knackered, you'll be replacing that anyway.
    FCN:5, 8 & 9
    If I'm not riding I'm shooting http://grahamsnook.com
    THE Game
    Watch out for HGVs
  • rustncogsrustncogs Posts: 84
    I use an MTB on slicks for commuting. Everything on it is an MTB part, I just went for a bigger crankset when I was setting it up.

    The usual Shimano MTB chainrings are 22.32.44 teeth, I went for 26.36.48 instead (with an 11-34t cassette):

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=22924

    Or you could just swap the 48t chainring, I think it's about £25.

    I was thinking about going for a road crankset but mixing mtb and road parts just seemed to be opening a whole can of worms. The above setup works perfectly, I never run out of gears.

    A road cassette would be better for where I commute at the mo, but I haven't been bothered. I wonder would a road cassette work without swapping the long cage rear mech as well though... anbody tried?
    FCN 7

    "Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson"
  • +1 on the larger front chainring too. I commute on a slicked up hardtail and as my fitness has improved I found it a little low geared for some parts of my commute and swapped out the largest ring for a 48T, which has made a big difference.

    Allows me to surpise a few roadies now an then on the ride to and from work, and ensures I can get a not too shabby top speed out of what is otherwise quite a heavy bike 8) .

    I would also advise against mixing MTB drivetrain with road drivetrain unless you really know what you are doing. The alignment differences can be subtle, but enough to be a pain.

    Have you thought of a cyclocross bike? This is the route I have decided to go down as it seems to offer a good compromise between on road speed, whilst giving you the option to go off road if you need it. Unless your off road riding is large drops and fairly hardcore downhilling that needs suspension, you can probably handle it fine with a decent cross bike and a set of cross style knobblies :wink:
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