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What's your "to do" list for a bike service?

JameyJamey Posts: 2,152
edited April 2009 in Commuting chat
I'm going to give my bike a big service this weekend and I think I've got pretty much everything covered in terms of jobs that need to be done and things I need to buy, but just to be on the safe side I'd appreciate it if a few of you could run through your normal lists of things you do/buy for a service just in case I've missed anything.

Cheers in advance.

Posts

  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    FWIW:
    Chain: check for wear, replace as necessary, otherwise clean as appropriate and lube
    Rear mech: clear crud from jock-eye wheels, otherise if it's working ok leave alone
    Wheels: check for trueing, correct as necessary. Have a look at wear indicator if old
    Tyres: check pressure, side walls for rot
    Headset: check for play, adjust as necessary
    Brakes: check pads for wear, replace and/or adjust alignment as necessary. Check cables for obvious signs of fraying etc.
    Bearings (wheel and/or bottom bracket if loose BB type) you might consider stripping down, cleaning and re-greasing, but only if you know what you're doing and won't cause more problems than you cure.
    Other: Clean in incaccesible areas, check all screws and bolts for tightness, have a gander at parts that might crack etc etc
  • atticaattica Posts: 2,362
    will3 wrote:
    Bearings (wheel and/or bottom bracket if loose BB type) you might consider stripping down, cleaning and re-greasing, but only if you know what you're doing and won't cause more problems than you cure.

    What will said, but I also give my wheels a spin whilst holding onto the axle (having taken them off the bike)

    You'll get a good idea of how much grit/muck/whatever is inside the bearings by the feel of them spinning and a clean and regrease at this stage can avoid problems later on.

    Don't forget to give the breaking surface of your wheels a good scrub too and a quick squirt of GT85 into all of the pivot points on brakes, levers and mechs never goes amiss.
    "Impressive break"

    "Thanks...

    ...I can taste blood"
  • gtvlussogtvlusso Posts: 5,112
    Strip the whole thing down - even take out the BB. Clean and regrease and "exposed" bearings - full rebuild (looking out for worn parts!) with plenty of coppaslip (Copper anti seize grease) on all theads, on quill stems, alloy seatposts (not carbon!). True wheels up and check spokes/nipples for wear or damage. Clean the b1tch up and take a test ride to make sure I have adequetely torqued all threded items up!
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    Attica wrote:

    What will said, but I also give my wheels a spin whilst holding onto the axle (having taken them off the bike)

    ah then you can play gyroscopes with the wheel: spin it up and then put one finger under one end of the axle and let go the other end. It will precess around your finger (don't do this in your living room)
  • brushedbrushed Posts: 63
    1.Give the beast (=FCN 6) a good wash.

    Murphys law dictates that the day after you wash your bike it will rain so I have 4 days to keep it clean - not using commuter beast til next tuesday.

    2. Clean the chain and sprockets
    3. Check for flints in tyres
    4. Relube chain - wet lube still
    5. Might even try to retrue the rear wheel that bent following trial with new Michelin Pro Grip 3 tyres that lasted a week - went over a pothole disguised as a puddle and flatted instantly thankfully only 5 mins from home so rode it on the rim - result slighlty buckled rear wheel.
    Now back to ancient Michelin Axial Pro Winter tyres in fetching green - bigger air chamber than new Michs even though they are both 23mm.

    Another example of bike makers changing stuff and making it worse.
    FCN 4 summer
    FCN 6 Winter

    'Strong, Light, Cheap : choose two' Keith Bontrager
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