Forum home Commuter cycling forum Commuting chat

what hybrid/ flatbar bike? £300-400

superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
edited April 2009 in Commuting chat
Anyone got any ideas for me to look into to get a bike for commuting?
I ride approx 15 miles a day on a relativly flat journey.
I was looking at something with a flatbar, rather than drop frame as I'm used to my old (rubbish) mountain bike.
Work should be getting the cycle to work scheme set up soon and I'm hoping to get something that I'll enjoy riding to work...

Posts

  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Flat bar road bikes:

    Specailized Sirrus, Giant FCR, Trek Soho.

    Hybrids
    Giant M2 or R2
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
    ....but what's the difference between a flat bar and a hybrid?
    I thought they were the same thing!
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    The term is used rather loosely. There are 2 main types, mtb type frames with 26" wheels that are modified and equipped for the road, and road type frames with 700c wheels that have flat bars, the latter are likely to be faster and are sometimes called "flat bar road bikes" , but the hybrid tag seems to fit too.
  • Eau RougeEau Rouge Posts: 1,118
    superdry wrote:
    ....but what's the difference between a flat bar and a hybrid?
    I thought they were the same thing!

    "Hybrid" is a marketing term rather than a type of bike. It covers anything from just this side of a mountain bike, to just short of a road bike. They are not all the same, and are not all as capable as each other on or off road.
    A flat-bar road bike is a road bike frame with flat bars replacing the drops. It will be great on the road, but no more usable off-road than the road bike it's based on, whereas at the other end of the scale you have hybrids that are no more useful on-road than the mountain bikes they are based on.

    Most of a bikes ability to actually go on or off road is about the tyres anyway, not the frame, and certainly not the handlebars. "Proper" off-roading is hugely better with some suspension, the same way proper road rising is hugely better with drops, but after that it's all much of a muchness.

    If you're going to be staying on the road, get a road bike, be it with flat or drop handlebars.
    If you're going to be riding it for more than an hour at a time, I'd really suggest you get drops. Being comfortable to use for a few hours is exactly what they are designed for.
  • superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
    It'll mainly be used for getting to work and back - about 1/2 hour each way.
    - I'm edging toward getting the road bike but with flat bars - I think it will be more comfortable for weaving in and out of traffic.
    I was thinking about the MTB with road wheels, but that's what I have at the minute (albiet a very cheap bike) and the gearing is all wrong - I just can't get a decent top speed.
  • Eau RougeEau Rouge Posts: 1,118
    superdry wrote:
    I think it will be more comfortable for weaving in and out of traffic.

    PS: You are just as much "traffic" as the cars and buses, and weaving on the road sounds dangerous and, well, un-traffic-like. Next you will be talking about pavements and jumping red lights.
    ;)
  • biondinobiondino Posts: 5,990
    Hey, M.Cole - would it be possible to get a sticky thread called "do you REALLY want a hybrid"? I think it'd be very useful to the new posters who want to commute but are nervous about road bikes/slick tyres/drop handlebars etc.
  • NGaleNGale Posts: 1,866
    I now have a flat bar road bike and love it, I know at the moment that going the whole hog for on a road bike isn't practical. however as I say my flat bar is lush although I wouldn't consider it to a a 'hybrid'

    only problem...I think you'll be looking at the £500 plus market in order to get anything decent
    Officers don't run, it's undignified and panics the men
  • superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
    What bike would you reccomend at the £500 level ? - I think it woudl be a flat bar road bike I would be after.
    nb. I have had mechanical disc brakes on a bike and wasn't impressed, so it woudl have to be v brakes or hydraulic (at my budget it'd be 'v' i guess).
  • Eau RougeEau Rouge Posts: 1,118
    NGale wrote:
    I know at the moment that going the whole hog for on a road bike isn't practical.

    Serious question, from someone who can just about understand why people need mountain bikes, but still hasn't figured out why motorbikes don't have drop handle bars too......
    What is actually different between your bike and the road bike that isn't practical, and what practical things can you do on yours that you couldn't do on the road bike.

    I'm sure there are good reasons, but I'm too closed minded to see them, and I don't like that.
  • NGaleNGale Posts: 1,866
    Eau Rouge wrote:
    NGale wrote:
    I know at the moment that going the whole hog for on a road bike isn't practical.

    Serious question, from someone who can just about understand why people need mountain bikes, but still hasn't figured out why motorbikes don't have drop handle bars too......
    What is actually different between your bike and the road bike that isn't practical, and what practical things can you do on yours that you couldn't do on the road bike.

    I'm sure there are good reasons, but I'm too closed minded to see them, and I don't like that.

    simply a question of safety. I tested a couple 'true' road bikes before I went for the flat bar roadie and didn't feel safe with the drop handle affair. the flat bar, had the lightness and road wheels I wanted, but I didn't feel as though I might be protected at speed over the handle bars if I had to stop suddenly. So I had a feeling of safety even if it was no different
    Officers don't run, it's undignified and panics the men
  • rally200rally200 Posts: 646
    If you are set on a flat bar then go for a road type. I have a hybrid (MTB oriented) thing & a drop bar road bike, I'm happier in on the road in rush hour on the road bike as I can keep up with the flow of traffic, I mainly keep to the cycle paths on the hybrid. But on the other hand the road bike is no fun on the cr*ppy uneven, glass strewn surface of the cycle paths, and I prefer fat tyres when its really icy.
  • sarajoysarajoy Posts: 1,675
    +1 on the flat bar roadies - got a Specialized Vita Sport - which is rather like the Sirrus range but with a girly geometry.

    I have gone and got some comfy bar-ends to give my hands somewhere else to go if they get tired of the same position, though :)
    4537512329_a78cc710e6_o.gif4537512331_ec1ef42fea_o.gif
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Perhaps the first four pages of this thread will help!

    http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtop ... 3#15243973
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • rally200rally200 Posts: 646
    DDD are you on a mission from God?


    Spead the word, spread the word. good on ya, but how do you manage to post all day from work?

    At my place just subscrbing to a forum on a works account is a disciplinary
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    rally200 wrote:
    DDD are you on a mission from God?


    Spead the word, spread the word. good on ya, but how do you manage to post all day from work?

    At my place just subscrbing to a forum on a works account is a disciplinary

    I type really fast, with my IE window really really small.
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • superdrysuperdry Posts: 36
    After looking at evans site there are a few sirrus in my price range.
    Is there any major difference in the sirrus 2009 http://www.evanscycles.com/products/specialized/sirrus-2009-hybrid-bike-ec016920 (less than £300), the sirrus 2008 http://www.evanscycles.com/products/specialized/sirrus-2008-hybrid-bike-ec001400 (£50 on top) and the sirrus sp0rt 2009 (£390) http://www.evanscycles.com/products/specialized/sirrus-sport-2009-hybrid-bike-ec016919
  • artaxerxesartaxerxes Posts: 612
    Also remember that road bike geometry varies a lot, so there are varieties of drop bar bikes like the following 3 that don't fit into the road race bike category.

    Cyclo-cross - more upright riding position than a road race bike I think? There are numerous threads about these bikes here with much more info, but I doubt there are any new CX bikes for £500.

    Audax - road race bike but with enough space between the tyres and frame for mudguards, a good example is the Ribble Winter Trainer

    Touring bikes - more upright riding position plus space for mudguards and pannier racks - a sensible bike for sensible (or boring) people! A good example is the Dawes Galaxy.

    Just bought a Ridgeback Horizon which is an audax / light-touring bike. Got the 2008 model for £500.

    If you want a flat barred road bike, Decathlon have also started a range, the bike in the link below will give an idea of what kind of components you should expect for £500. You can then compare brands of bikes and decide.

    http://www.decathlon.co.uk/EN/fitness-3-51-60-63-69567465/
  • FyPunKFyPunK Posts: 160
    I have and recommend the Ridgeback Velocity, I have had mine 12 months and use it every day, it has dealt with all kinds of censored over the winter, being on the coast it has salt spray and sand thrown at and when cleaned looks as good as new, I cannot compare with other bikes but for me is a very comfortable fastish bike that seems to have a solid build. Worth looking at and well within your price range. My commute is 13 miles which now the sun has re-appeared will extend to 26 miles.
    www.justgiving.com/aidyneal Cycling Manchester to Blackpool. Look out for number 1691
  • symosymo Posts: 1,743
    Kona Dew
    +++++++++++++++++++++
    we are the proud, the few, Descendents.

    Panama - finally putting a nail in the economic theory of the trickle down effect.
  • PBoPBo Posts: 2,493
    if you end up having to use halfords for cycle scheme, I got a carrera gryphon from them. It's a flat bar roadbike - but has its geometry adjusted for the different reach of flats compared to drops. Tyres are fairly skinny (700/25R 700/28F), so it is designed for proper roads, but a tad extra comfort.

    Basically i'm very pleased with it for the price - i got the cable disc model, but there is a v brake version too.

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... &langId=-1

    +1 for adding bar ends.

    If you do any browsing on this forum at all, you'll pick up on polarised opinions about halfords though.....It's not the quality of the carrera range, it's the standard of the set up that's the issue. varies a lot from store to store.

    but if that's who your C2W scheme is with, then it's a moot point....

    Another advantage my bike has for a commuter is suitable brazings for rack mud guards etc. If you go for the "proper" roadbike - consider if this is important to you or not, and check what can be done on the model you choose.
    PBo
  • boardman urban comp . got mine through halfords ctw scheme for £360.00 :D its a £500.00 bike only had it two weeks but i am very happy with it .only wieghs 23 pounds thats only 2 pounds heavier than my £3500.00 mtb !!! its well worth checking out 8)
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