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Which bike has better components/materials?

danielcpatersondanielcpaterson Posts: 13
edited April 2009 in Commuting chat
Hi guys,
I'm looking to buy a good hybrid bike for fitness, city and medium road trips.
Which one has better components/materials etc?

Trek 7.5 FX 2008: Aluminium frame, carbon fork, 32mm Bontrager tyres, cassette 11-26, 9 speed, crank 48/36/26, alloy pedals, avid brakes.

Giant CRS Alliance 2008: Composite frame, carbon composite fork w/ aluminium steerer, 35mm Kenda tyres, cassette 12-26, 27 speed, crank 12-26, steel pedals, shimano brakes.

Thanks everyone,
Daniel

Posts

  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    The Giant. Its to my knowlege a aluminium frame with carbon seat/chain stays and fork. It's light and quite fast.

    I have to say that neither are the best for fitness. A road bike obviously would be best for all the uses you've listed (I use a road bike for those uses as do many on the site). But I the CRS is very much a comfort commuter. If you had to go flat bar you'd be better off with a flat bar road bike (you can pedal harder, faster for longer = fitter). However, the flat bar can be uncomfortable to some so the way to resolve that is to go for drop handlebars i.e. a road bike.

    And for the £750 the CRS is costing you could have a very decent spec road bike for that money.
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • AndyMancAndyManc Posts: 1,393
    Trek Hybrids are described as 'training bikes', they can be used for fitness training ( I suppose all bikes can :roll: ).

    I've got the 7.3 but will soon be buying a road (cyclocross) bike.

    Again the major consideration, IMO, is to pick a bike that you feel most comfortable on.

    I'm happy with my Trek and will continue to use it, I always advise the 'casual' biker to choose a hybrid over a road bike, if at a later date you get the 'speed buzz' you could always take a look at 'road bikes'.



    .
    Specialized Hardrock Pro/Trek FX 7.3 Hybrid/Specialized Enduro/Specialized Tri-Cross Sport
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  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    AndyManc wrote:
    Trek Hybrids are described as 'training bikes', they can be used for fitness training ( I suppose all bikes can :roll: ).

    Much like bikes described as shoppers could be a Pinerello taken to the shops... or any bike primarily ridden on the road is and could be described as a "road bike". :roll: They're not though are they.

    Trek could describe its hybrids as training bikes, they're not. They are Mountain bike frames with a rigid fork and slick tyres slapped on, they're designed for road and soft trail use and offer a particular riding position.

    The point I was making is that the bikes suggested aren't (given that all bikes can be used for training) the best bikes for training IMO. Fact is peddaling at a certain cadence is what makes you fitter on a bike. A road bike or flat bar road bike allows you to do this faster for longer and arguably more comfortably.
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,713
    AndyManc wrote:
    Trek Hybrids are described as 'training bikes', they can be used for fitness training ( I suppose all bikes can :roll: ).

    I've got the 7.3 but will soon be buying a road (cyclocross) bike.

    Again the major consideration, IMO, is to pick a bike that you feel most comfortable on.

    I'm happy with my Trek and will continue to use it, I always advise the 'casual' biker to choose a hybrid over a road bike, if at a later date you get the 'speed buzz' you could always take a look at 'road bikes'.
    .

    A CX is def a good choice esp when coming from Hybrid/MTB but be aware canti brakes DON'T have the same stopping power as calipers and Carbon forks + canti = shudder when you slam on the anchors, nothing to worry about though they still stop.

    Plus you can nip off road whenever you like :D
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
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  • rally200rally200 Posts: 646
    to the OP - don't get too hung up on componentry until you've decided what type of bike hybrid/flat bar road/cross/drop bar road - as long as you're getting sora(road) or alivio (hybrid) level components or better you wont go too far wrong. Try as many different types & brands as you can & don't let the lbs hurry you. As DDD says you could get a lot of road bike for your budget & if your're looking for something sporty an all alluminium roadbike will give more bang for your buck than a fancy composite hybrid

    I bought a CRS when coming back to bikes a couple of years ago, because I went into lbs wanting a short distance commuter (& with what now seems a strange idea that road bikes are flimsy,) and for that its OK, but if you'e intending to use it for fitness I reckon you'd tire of the upright position pretty quickly.

    I've since bought a road bke and my CRS is now relagated to days when I have to park at the station or icy weather
  • rally200rally200 Posts: 646
    to the OP - don't get too hung up on componentry until you've decided what type of bike hybrid/flat bar road/cross/drop bar road - as long as you're getting sora(road) or alivio (hybrid) level components or better you wont go too far wrong. Try as many different types & brands as you can & don't let the lbs hurry you. As DDD says you could get a lot of road bike for your budget & if your're looking for something sporty an all alluminium roadbike will give more bang for your buck than a fancy composite hybrid

    I bought a CRS when coming back to bikes a couple of years ago, because I went into lbs wanting a short distance commuter (& with what now seems a strange idea that road bikes are flimsy,) and for that its OK, but if you'e intending to use it for fitness I reckon you'd tire of the upright position pretty quickly.

    I've since bought a road bke and my CRS is now relagated to days when I have to park at the station or icy weather
  • Hi guys,
    Thanks for your replies. Just a few points.

    I am avoiding drops because I prefer a more upright position.
    I'm looking for a good hybrid or a flat bar road bike. I'm not looking at pure road or cyclocross.

    However, I considered the Specialized Sirrus Elite 2008 and the Giant FCR 1 2008 but many people have said that they don't cope well in the city, are quite harsh rides, and should be reserved mainly for the road. Do you disagree? What is the best flatbar road bike for me? The Giant CRS Alliance 2008 isn't costing £750 btw. I can get one for close to £450.

    Does the Trek 7.5 FX 2008 really have a mountain bike frame? It seems very highly rated for city riding, medium road trips. Apparently also light, versatile and comfortable.

    Of the bikes we have mentioned, which should i buy?

    Cheers,
    Daniel
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    edited March 2009

    However, I considered the Specialized Sirrus Elite 2008 and the Giant FCR 1 2008 but many people have said that they don't cope well in the city, are quite harsh rides, and should be reserved mainly for the road.

    I don't understand how the two bikes you've listed can't cope for the city and yet are better reserved for the road. A city is mostly comprised of roads...
    Does the Trek 7.5 FX 2008 really have a mountain bike frame? It seems very highly rated for city riding, medium road trips. Apparently also light, versatile and comfortable.

    Of the bikes we have mentioned, which should i buy?

    Cheers,
    Daniel

    Most Hybrids of the Trek's nature have their foundations in Mountain bike frames. The joints, lugs, welds etc aren't as robust making the frame lighter than their mountain bike counterparts.

    Between the Trek and the CRS I'd probably say the Trek, however I feel that the CRS Alliance (being once a £700 bike) has the better components.

    If it was my money (given I already own the 26inch wheel version) I would go for this: Giant Escape R2

    The 700cc wheels make going faster and more importantly further easier, which is better for training IMO.
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    It is quite possible to have a more upright position on a road bike with the right combination of stem and spacers. 90% of the time the hoods are used anyway. My tourer is set up like this.
  • biondinobiondino Posts: 5,990
    City and road riding on an MTB frame is just silly!

    Go to a friendly LBS and ride a MTB-framed hybrid like the Trek, then a road-framed hybrid like the Sirrus. I will bet £5 of my own hard-earned that you massively prefer the latter on city streets.
  • RoastieRoastie Posts: 1,968
    edited March 2009
    biondino wrote:
    City and road riding on an MTB frame is just silly!
    Hmm ... you may not say this if you negotiate the Borough Wheel Testing Strip on a daily basis!

    Ordinarily I'd have agreed wholeheartedly that MTBs are stupid - but given how so many of the roads I travel on are so terrible, I don't think I'd mind riding something with a little travel to take out the sting and strength to take the hammering. Perhaps something like a Scalpel...

    edit: Or a crosser
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Personally I don't understand the OP's choice and I agree with alfablue's point that a road bike can be made or come with a upright position (i.e Specialzed Allez, Bianchi Via Nirone, Giant SCR).

    I also don't understand the comment about flat bar road bikes not being able to cope in the city (that's what they were designed for, Couriers originally strapped flat handlebars to their roadbikes so they could still have the speed and an absolute upright position - they also have them as narrow as possible so they can filter through traffic easily).

    I personally think if you want a bike for fitness, medium distance and commuting/city riding then get a sporty bike that you can pedal fast for long periods. I wanted the same thing and bought a Giant SCR road bike... its one of the few things in life where I can say I made the right decision with no second thoughts.

    But if the OP's choice is between a CRS or a Trek I'd very reluctantly get the Trek as it edges on the fitness side of things (the CRS range are glorified shoppers). I'd miss those 700c wheels though.

    In all honesty, I'd open myself up to other options...
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • prawnyprawny Posts: 5,414
    The trek has got 700c wheels hasn't it? If I was buying a hybrid I'd go for the next trek up the 7.6 (proper road drivetrain) or a giant FCR, The CRS looks ok, but a bit too comfortable, if you know what I mean (?)
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
    Voodoo Bizango - 2014 - Dead - Hit by a car
    Vitus Sentier VRS - 2017
  • Hi guys,

    Wow this forum is so much better than other forums i've posted on, where noone replies on topic or in detail. Thankyou very much for your thoughts so far.
    Just to let you know, I am not fixed on those 2 bikes - they were just popular suggestions I have had mentioned to me.

    Regarding the Sirrus and FCR - I was told that they are uncomfortable over uneven paving, thin gravel, potholes and cobbles, all of which are found in the city. This isn't my opinion however, as I wouldn't know. Anyway, perhaps the Trek 7.5 and CRS aren't quite what I'm looking for.

    I am indeed interested in the Giant FCR1 2008 and the Sirrrus Elite 2008. The colours/decals on the FCR are quite flashy and bright though - really dont want it to get stolen in Glasgow - do you reckon this is even an issue? I probably prefer the FCR to the Sirrus.

    The issue with the Trek 7.6 is that I would have to get the 2007 model as the 08 and 09 are above my price range. This model is also hard to find and not the best looking bike.

    The Giant SCR 3 or 4 is in my price range but I'm not sure how to get rid of the drops on them? Is the SCR3/4 much better than the FCR1?
    The Giant Escape R8 and R2 are both nice too but how do they compare to the other giants?

    It seems that I am veering towards Giant. Now to make a decision between FCR, SCR and Escape. Bear in mind when I say fitness I dont mean daily hard training or anything, I just mean keeping fit. I also need the bike to be fairly comfortable and to be able to cope with at least some rough surfaces.

    Look forward to hearing your thoughts!
    Thanks again,
    Daniel
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Hi guys,

    Wow this forum is so much better than other forums i've posted on, where noone replies on topic or in detail. Thankyou very much for your thoughts so far.

    No worries don't mention it. We like being helpfull.
    Regarding the Sirrus and FCR - I was told that they are uncomfortable over uneven paving, thin gravel, potholes and cobbles, all of which are found in the city.
    Any bike unless it has suspension is going to deliver discomfort while going over these surfaces. Unless the majority or large part of you commute is comprised of these surfaces i wouldn't worry.
    The colours/decals on the FCR are quite flashy and bright though - really dont want it to get stolen in Glasgow - do you reckon this is even an issue?

    Every bike is at risk. Thieves are oppurtunists, a good d-lock for the back wheel and frame and a second lock for the front wheel is the way to go.
    The Giant SCR 3 or 4 is in my price range but I'm not sure how to get rid of the drops on them? Is the SCR3/4 much better than the FCR1?

    Not sure on the spec, but interms of the drops you can ride the hoods that'll give you a upright position and in my opinion far more comfortable than the static riding position a flat bar offers. More places to put your hands means more comfort (at this level of riding) so drop handlebars are golden.
    The Giant Escape R8 and R2 are both nice too but how do they compare to the other giants?

    Though I'm not a big fan of hybrids my M2 was and is a fanstatic bike. The only thing I didn't like was the 26inch wheels didn't do the gearing justice, it needed 700c wheels. The R version of the bike (R2 and R8) has those wheels.

    Of the three bikes R2, FCR and SCR I'd choose SCR.
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • Hi there, thanks so much for your detailed reply.

    The majority of my riding won't be too rough so I suppose there isn't a big problem there. I'm only 11 stone and if I'm carrying anything, it will be a rucksack or a violin so I'm sure these bikes can deal with that.

    I am now deciding between the FCR and the SCR. I presume the Escape R8 and R2 aren't quite in the same league. I do worry though that because of the drops on the SCR, sudden braking in Glasgow city centre may be an issue due to hand placement - as I will mainly be using the flats. I appreciate the potential of multiple hand positions though.

    Model-wise: in general model 4 is the entry and 1 is the top.

    In terms of prices and availability:
    I can get the FCR 1 2008 for £440.
    FCR 2 2008 for £372.
    FCR 2 2009 for £538.
    SCR 1.5 2008 for £519.
    SCR 2 2008 for £545.
    SCR 3 2007 for £465.

    I take it my final decision is really between the FCR 1 and the SCR 1.5?
    PS. My inside leg is 34". Is my ideal frame size 22"? I would rather not be hunching or stretching - I like to be fairly upright most of the time.

    Look forward to your responses,
    Thanks again,
    Daniel
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Hi there, thanks so much for your detailed reply.

    The majority of my riding won't be too rough so I suppose there isn't a big problem there. I'm only 11 stone and if I'm carrying anything, it will be a rucksack or a violin so I'm sure these bikes can deal with that.

    At that weight you better be careful the bike doesn't float away with you on top of it. :P

    I'm 15st.8lbs my SCR holds up against my awesome power.
    I am now deciding between the FCR and the SCR. I presume the Escape R8 and R2 aren't quite in the same league.

    The Escape range are zippy fast hybrids with great brakes, completely different ride to the FCR and SCR. I would suggest trying them out before you make a decision, the road bike with drops (if you haven't tried one before) will be the most challenging but opens up the most potential IMO.
    I do worry though that because of the drops on the SCR, sudden braking in Glasgow city centre may be an issue due to hand placement - as I will mainly be using the flats. I appreciate the potential of multiple hand positions though.

    Most people 'ride on the drops' when commuting, (see below the third picture) this gives you a mostly upright position (this in and of itself can be adjusted by raising the handlebars via the spacers or flipping the stem). Riding the drops also benefits from the hands being positioned over the brakes.

    dropbarpositions.jpg

    IMO sudden braking is dependant on how well the brakes work, but most importantly the rider's ability to anticpate, forward plan and their reaction time.
    Model-wise: in general model 4 is the entry and 1 is the top.

    In terms of prices and availability:
    I can get the FCR 1 2008 for £440.
    FCR 2 2008 for £372.
    FCR 2 2009 for £538.
    SCR 1.5 2008 for £519.
    SCR 2 2008 for £545.
    SCR 3 2007 for £465.

    I take it my final decision is really between the FCR 1 and the SCR 1.5?
    PS. My inside leg is 34". Is my ideal frame size 22"? I would rather not be hunching or stretching - I like to be fairly upright most of the time.

    Generally I think your final decision comes down to the one you can afford coupled with the deal that provides best value for money. Looking at those prices I would buy the SCR 1.5 (Tiagra groupset and carbon fibre seatpost, I think).

    In terms of size, Giant attempt to make it easy by simply listing their frames as Small, medium, medium/large, large and extra large.

    Your leg indicates you are about 6ft, I would say you were a Large (possibly extra large if your over 6ft2'').

    One last thing the SCR was the 2008 model, are you sure you can get those bikes in your size?
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • MrChuckMrChuck Posts: 1,663
    Sounds like you've moved on from the Trek 7.5 but my 2 cents worth anyway- I have an older 7.5 (or 7500 as it was then) and like it a lot, although it is a bit on the heavy side. For type of bike in general, IMO it depends on what sort of riding you see yourself doing and if there is potential for getting another one sometime in the future.
    If you're mainly going to be doing road rides for fitness and will be out on the open roads then a road bike is obviously a pretty good choice! As you've said though riding around city roads isn't necessarily the same thing and road bikes don't make as good 'utility' bikes as hybrids do- again IMO.
    So I guess you'll be compromising one way or the other: A road bike that's great for training but perhaps not as great as everyday transport, or a hybrid that's good Mon-Fri but not ideal when you're doing a training ride on the w/e. No doubt you'll fall somewhere in between but only you can say where!

    Helpful eh? :?
  • Hi guys many thanks for your responses.

    I can see from those pictures that it is possible to ride quite upright (not using the drops) and still be able to access the brakes quite easily. I would prefer to be able to have more hand positions, but I will probably be using the bike mostly in the city centre during the week and then for medium bike road trips during the weekend. I am slightly concerned about control in traffic and the need to stop suddenly with no forward planning. I will be using it for cycling 10 minutes to college, exploring the city, shopping and smooth bike paths so the percentage of city riding is more than the percentage of open road, however I'd rather get a high spec bike that has potenial rather than one I will have to soon replace. I do like the Trek 7.5 - it is a solid and versatile bike, but something is telling me I'll end up upgrading it if I get it, plus I have leaned toward Giant for their high spec durable components for some time now.

    I noticed that the Defy range is the replacement for the SCR. I can get a Defy 2.5 2009 for £599. Its equivalent, the SCR 2 2008 is not much less at £545. I can also get a Defy 3 2009 for £535. I just wondered what your thoughts are on this?

    Yes I am just over 6ft, so I'll go for large. And yes the SCR 1.5 2008 is available in large. I'd rather the bike was definitely not on the large size. I don't want to be hunched over, stretching forward as I am a violinist and my shoulders, neck, back are strained enough from a day of constant playing.

    Look forward to your replies and to making a decision!
    Thanks again,
    Daniel
  • rally200rally200 Posts: 646
    Hi guys many thanks for your responses.


    I noticed that the Defy range is the replacement for the SCR. I can get a Defy 2.5 2009 for £599. Its equivalent, the SCR 2 2008 is not much less at £545. I can also get a Defy 3 2009 for £535. I just wondered what your thoughts are on this?

    Yes I am just over 6ft, so I'll go for large. And yes the SCR 1.5 2008 is available in large. I'd rather the bike was definitely not on the large size. I don't want to be hunched over, stretching forward as I am a violinist and my shoulders, neck, back are strained enough from a day of constant playing.

    Try some, try some, try. . ....

    The riding position on an SCR or a Defy is not as radical as you're thinking, .they're not pro racing bikes, but are a 100% more fun than most hybrids. completely safe in traffic
  • Hello!

    Having done some more research, I've decided to get drops as I'll have more hand positions, will still be able to be quite upright and will get used to the brakes.
    This rules out the FCR range.
    It is now between buying a Defy 2.5 2009 for £599 or a SCR 1.5 2008 for £519. I'm not massively concerned about the difference in price here.
    The main things I notice between their specs are:

    Scr is AluxX frame, Defy is AluxX SL.
    Scr is 18 speed, Defy is 27.
    Scr chainset is Tiagra double, Defy is FSA Vero triple.
    Scr bottom bracket is Tiagra external, Defy is FSA cartridge.
    Scr handlebars are Giant A3 aluminium, Defy is Giant Anatomic O.S.
    Scr brakes are Shimano A450, Defy are Tektro R350 Dual pivot.
    Scr tyres are Kenda 26mm, Defy are Kenda Kriterium L3R 25mm.
    Scr saddle is Selle Royal Viper, Defy is Giant performance road.
    Scr seat post is carbon composite, Defy is Aluminium.
    Scr has no pedals, Defy has Wellgo Road.

    If you suggest the SCR, what pedals should I buy (i DONT want clipless), and what should I upgrade the tyres to? Continental GP4000, Bontrager Hardcase, Armadillo, Gatorskins?

    I don't have much time to test ride bikes which is why I am posting quite a bit on this subject to minimise risk of disappointment but to be honest, I'm currently riding a rusting, small mountain bike in need of a service which I have had since I was a kid, so whatever I get is going to feel a lot better compared to it.

    DonDaddyD where are you? lol I need your wisdom :D

    Thanks people,
    Daniel
  • Hi guys, decided to get the SCR 1.5 2008 for £519 as it is a higher spec bike for less money. Also the front end seems marginally higher than the Defy which should keep me fairly upright.

    Just 2 questions. What are the best pedals for it? (It comes without pedals and I DONT want clipless). Also, what should I upgrade the tyres to? I would probably prefer thick tyres for the added comfort but want as little punctures as possible.

    This will probably be my last post so thank you so much for your suggestions, advice and time. I really appreciate it.

    All the best guys,
    Daniel
  • Hi guys, even though there weren't any responses to my last post, I bought Tioga MX Pro pedals which are solid platforms with good grip.
    Not sure what to upgrade the tyres to but i'm sure that has been discussed on other treads. Thanks again for your help,
    Daniel
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Daniel

    Well done on your purchase. You have a bike better than mine (I have a Giant SCR3). Even though I complain about my bike, in all honesty it has done nothing wrong except to get me more involved in this cycling madness!

    I can't say I've heard of your pedals, I'm a clipless man, SPD-sl to be precise but there are so many pedals you can't really go wrong.

    Tyres, I swear by Continental GP4000s. However, Continental 4 seasons seem to be devourering the road with little complaint. For commuting you cannot go wrong with either. Simple rule.

    Want to go fast: Conti GP4000s
    Want more puncture resistance: Conti 4 seasons

    Also, I tend not to be on the site during weekends, which is why I didn't get around to posting to you.

    Don't hesitate to ask if you need help raising the handlebars! But you should be fine, you may even want to lower it.

    Good luck and welcome to the world of road bikes! Let us know how you find it!!!!

    +1 sir
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • Hi,
    Thankyou very much - i'm excited to get it and start riding! I'm going to get some Conti GP 4 seasons I think - I see they are highly regarded. Also, does anyone know: can I put 28c wheels on the SCR 1.5? I think many people have tried before but ive never heard whether it fits or not. I would like some 28s on it for added comfort in city.

    Thanks again guys,
    All the best,
    Daniel
  • rally200rally200 Posts: 646
    Daniel

    Great choice - that's a lot of bike for the money (esp. compared to the Defy spec & prices) hope you enjoy it. let us know how you get on

    Why not see how you get on with the standard 26mm tyres before you decide on which size to get when you upgrade, you might even decide you want something narrower! Also if you get the 28s on it might give you problems with mudguard clearance (though most people will be taking them off about now)
  • cpfc66cpfc66 Posts: 1
    DonDaddyD
    Hi Don Daddy,

    I am looking into buying a bike for travel to Wimbledon where I will be working for 3 weeks during the tennis.
    I live in near Crystal Palace so its about 8 miles I think, I was wondering if you had any advice on what bike to buy or where might be a good place to buy a bike.
    The other thing is that my girlfriend will also want to commute by bike so will look into getting her a bike also.
    I work mainly abroad so was looking into buying a bike that will be good for now and that I might also keep for future use, it will be mainly for commuting but I will also use it to try and keep fit when I am home.
    Also its fairly hilly around Crystal Palace and Wimbledon so if you had any advice on routes that would also be appreciated.
    I saw you had written a lot on one forum which I stumbled across as I have been looked at the Giant CRS Alliance,

    I'd be grateful of any advice

    Christopher
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