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27 x 1 1/4 fixed wheelset

roof30roof30 Posts: 57
edited March 2009 in Road general
Hi

Does anyone know where I can source a new set of 27x1 1/4 wheelset with a fixed hub? My sister has just given me an old Elswick frame (bought by my parents in 1978) which I've stripped and want to make into a fixie. Wheelset taken off and chucked was 27x1 1/4, and I don't know if a 700c set will fit.

Any advice anyone?

Thanks,
roof30
Cannondale Synapse AL 105, Specialized Sirrus Comp

Posts

  • I tend to prefer 27" wheels with older bikes as I ride big frames and they look more 'proportioned'. However you will be making a rod for your back as it's a 700c world out there....

    SJS cycles will sell you the parts if you're really keen
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    Should have kept the old rims and rebuilt the wheels with new hubs if they were the reason for recycling them or buy a pair of rims/hubs/spokes and start afresh. If you can work out the spoke length and lace the wheel your LBS should be able to finish them off for under £10/wheel, mine did.
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • GarethPJGarethPJ Posts: 295
    When it comes to fitting 700c wheels in a frame intended for 27 x 1 1/4" rims you shouldn't be too worried. The difference in radius is only 4mm, which is barely noticable. The problem most people have is that they fit skinny tyres which mean the clearances look huge. Fit a tyre as fat as the 1 1/4" original and it will look just fine. Something like a Michelin World Tour looks pretty traditional too, or a tanwall Dynamic would still look traditional while being a bit faster.

    Nobody ever noticed the difference when I fitted 700c Dynamics to my old Carlton.
  • meagainmeagain Posts: 2,331
    As you've slung the the original wheels, best to go for 700s IMO.

    If however you MUST have 27s, then I've a new pair of ally rims hanging in the garage....yours for 25 quid incl P&P and you can build 'em onto hubs of your choice!
    d.j.
    "Cancel my subscription to the resurrection."
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,964
    I have new 27" on two of my bikes, Edinburgh Cycles is your best bet I believe they're about £30 per complete wheel, although they will be basic compared to 700c that said you could buy the rims and have any hub you like built up.

    They look fine and ride well with the Conti ultra sport tyres

    3273628907_7916bf8c1f.jpg
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
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  • roof30roof30 Posts: 57
    Thanks itboffin. Seems as though their 27" wheelset is freewheel rather than fixed though. Just trying to save a bit o' money on the wheelset considering the frame was free.

    By the way, awesome looking bike!

    Cheers
    Cannondale Synapse AL 105, Specialized Sirrus Comp
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,964
    roof30 wrote:
    Thanks itboffin. Seems as though their 27" wheelset is freewheel rather than fixed though. Just trying to save a bit o' money on the wheelset considering the frame was free.

    By the way, awesome looking bike!

    Cheers

    Thanks it looks even better now I've taped the bars and fitted full mud guards.

    Edit: for a short while I had a Miche fixed sprocket & carrier on an old raleigh using those same wheels, it just screws on the same as a freewheel.
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • robbarkerrobbarker Posts: 1,367
    Shame you junked them, fixed sprockets fit straight on to old screw-on freewheel type hubs. All you need to do is respace the axle (usually 1 washer) and redish the wheel and you a perfect fixed wheel. You do need 2 brakes though as here's no scope to fit a lockring. And chaintugs if QR.

    Now you're chucked them, either get another pair from somewhere and do as suggested, of get some 700c wheels with a fixed hub (the problem you'll have now is getting the correct rear hub OLN width - most fixie hubs are 120mm, your frame is probably 126..) and get some Tektro very deep drop brakes from SJS which will take up the difference in brake drop.
  • GarethPJGarethPJ Posts: 295
    robbarker wrote:
    Shame you junked them, fixed sprockets fit straight on to old screw-on freewheel type hubs. All you need to do is respace the axle (usually 1 washer) and redish the wheel and you a perfect fixed wheel. You do need 2 brakes though as here's no scope to fit a lockring. And chaintugs if QR.

    Now you're chucked them, either get another pair from somewhere and do as suggested, of get some 700c wheels with a fixed hub (the problem you'll have now is getting the correct rear hub OLN width - most fixie hubs are 120mm, your frame is probably 126..) and get some Tektro very deep drop brakes from SJS which will take up the difference in brake drop.

    Firstly it takes more than one washer to redish a multiple freewheel hub to fixed. A five speed block is about an inch thick, compare that with the depth of a fixed sprocket. More gears means even more difference.

    Secondly a 70's Elswick would probably be spaced at 120mm. It's probably a ten speed after all.

    And finally the drop is only 4mm different something that will often be possible with the original calipers. Anyway many old bikes had much deeper drop calipers than modern "deep drop" items. For example I had an old Coventry Eagle where the rear brake drop was close to 80mm (three inches!), those very deep drop Tektros will only go to 73mm.
  • robbarkerrobbarker Posts: 1,367
    GarethPJ wrote:

    Firstly it takes more than one washer to redish a multiple freewheel hub to fixed. A five speed block is about an inch thick, compare that with the depth of a fixed sprocket. More gears means even more difference.

    Secondly a 70's Elswick would probably be spaced at 120mm. It's probably a ten speed after all.

    And finally the drop is only 4mm different something that will often be possible with the original calipers. Anyway many old bikes had much deeper drop calipers than modern "deep drop" items. For example I had an old Coventry Eagle where the rear brake drop was close to 80mm (three inches!), those very deep drop Tektros will only go to 73mm.

    I did exactly this this week for ny new pub bike (a freebie Claud Butler), one washer (admittedly a thick one, 4mm or so, so perhaps more accurately described as a spacer) and a redish. Combine with a carefully chosen BB axle length and a perfect chainline is the result.

    This one may well be 120mm, which would be a result, but sod and his law may apply to a bike that age.

    The "original callipers" are likely to be the ubiquitous weinmann centrepulls, which usually need the extra drop of the Tektros to replace them. I wouldn't like to have to use centrepulls to actually stop a bike! IME they won't stretch the extra distance for 700c rims, but every frame is different I suppose. Talking of which, 80mm is very long indeed!
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