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Total miles a year on a Brompton

cakewalkcakewalk Posts: 220
edited February 2009 in Commuting chat
I'm probably over 2000. Anyone do more than this?
"I thought of it while riding my bicycle."

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  • Clever PunClever Pun Posts: 6,778
    good work... what's your max journey on it, I did 10 miles and I thought I was going to be ripped asunder (the brooks isn't broken in yet)

    mines probably more like 500... at a push
    Purveyor of sonic doom

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  • cakewalkcakewalk Posts: 220
    Clever Pun wrote:
    good work... what's your max journey on it, I did 10 miles and I thought I was going to be ripped asunder (the brooks isn't broken in yet)

    mines probably more like 500... at a push

    My commute is four miles one way. I've upgraded the saddle. I Did 20 miles once one evening.

    I'm beginning to think the Brompton is the perfect training tool. I think a mile on a Brompton is equal to 1.5 miles on a standard bike?

    Great bike though - for short rides!
    "I thought of it while riding my bicycle."
  • stuaffstuaff Posts: 1,735
    Plenty of people use them for touring. And racing too (plenty at the Smithfield Nocturne!). They are nice bikes, but I'm more of a masher than a spinner, so I think the gear range of most of them would drive me nuts (the new six speed would be OK though).
    Dahon Speed Pro TT; Trek Portland
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  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    Hi, I use mine pretty much everyday even if it is only popping out to the supermarket about 1 mile away. It has however done a lot more substantial distances in the past. It's great as you don't need to lock it up you can just put it in the trolley. No fuffing around locking it up. Well the first one did the Grand Tour until it was stolen shortly after from outside London University in Mallet St beneath a CCTV camera and secured with a substantial Kryptonite D-lock which was opened with a Bic pen I have since been told. Anyway insurance paid for a new one. Don't buy a Kryptonite lock! I now use Abus Granit.

    Anyway in June 2004 I went down to Biarritz on the TGV with it and then cycled into the Basque Country Bidart, Saint Jean de Luz, St Jean de Pied-de-Port gradually making my way over to the famous Pyrennean Cols doing the Col de Marie Blanc, the Aubisque, the Soulor and the Tourmalet all on my red Brompton(L6 2004 vintage). Did about 60-70 miles a day sometimes alot less sometimes more depending on how I was feeling and what I wanted to see or do, one day I covered 96 miles on this route I planned involving the Aubisque and Soulor, very little luggage except for lunch and water on this day. There were a few rest days as well. Once I left the mountains I headed north back around Lourdes and Pau into the Bearn, Salles de Bearne back to Bayonne and Biarritz just in time to jump back on the TGV just under 3 weeks later. The train deal was a Times offer £75 to anywhere in France and back from Waterloo with upgrade to first class for an extra £25 which I took. I have one of the old style Brompton touring panniers when they had an all metal frame and none of this plastic which I see they now use which in my view makes the pannier frame inferior in the strength department meaning they are not so robust and therefore you cannot carry so much.

    I carried a Vaude Ultralight 2 man tent, sleeping bag and assortment of clothes and all the other essentials to camp. I think I stayed in an auberge once and of course hotel in Paris in Pigalle which was fun but generally camped. The Brompton was a constant source of curiosity everywhere I went however in France unlike the UK they are genuinely interested and want to know all about it, preferring not to hurl abuse or chuck rocks or cans at you because you are riding something different.

    Mine is a straight L6 2004 no back rack or lights to make it heavier than necessary. I bought a bar rack for the rear to mount on the seat post when the bike was up which worked really well. It was so stable on the move much more than I had anitcipated. The gearing was fine for me. I climbed the Cols no problems although after I seriously considered trying to fit a second smaller front chainring as I believe some Brompton owners have done. Descending was a bit hair raising at times trying desperately not to over heat the brake blocks with the small 16" wheels on std brakes but I managed ok. Before I left home I removed all the inner cables and thoroughly greased them which transformed the brakes and gearchange. Some days riding I had no luggage or very little as I decided to stay at a campsite for several nights other days was a big move day but the Brompton handled it all fine. I have a nice shot of it loaded up adjacent to the Pyramid in the Louvre and I cycled up the Champs Elysee and around the Arc de Triomphe on it albeit very early in the morning. One of the best cycling hoildays I've had. The French loved the Brompton. Sometimes in a small village town I would have 4 or 5 people coming up to find out what it was. Riding aorund Ascain I overtook to french riders out on a training ride. They weren't very gracious. The only person who really didn't take a shine to it was the guard on the TGV leaving Paris heading out. He took one look at me on the platform and exclaimed "Non a velo! Vous ne pouvez pas voyager avec ca. Desole" and walked off. "Mais c'est un velo pliant........." He didn't want to know. Of course what he didn't know was that Brompton is the best folder on the market and it is BRITISH. Where would the French be without the British to save their country. D'accord. Plus I kew that I had previoulsy checked it was ok to travel on the Eurostar and TGV with it. I collapsed it, boarded the train and sat waiting for the Grand Depart. About 20 minutes after departure as we zipped out of the Paris suburbs he tapped me on the shoulder "Monsieur, votre ticket et votre velo?" "Voila mon ticket, mon velo c'est la, a la bas. " He glanced toward where my hand was pointing to my folded Brompton sitting snugly and quietly in the luggage rack, he then turned and walked off without so much as a word. England 1 France 0.

    The Brompton is definitely able to tour just be prepared sometimes to spend alot if time showing it to all sorts of people. It's a great point of conversation and way to meet people.

    I've also ridden it all over London out of necessity as it is the best way to get around the capital even rode it up Crouch Hill without stopping. They didn't tell me it was so steep.

    Keep away from wet man hole covers and white lines though which you would anway.
    :D
    Alex
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    dilemna wrote:
    . . .l Kryptonite D-lock which was opened with a Bic pen I have since been told. Anyway insurance paid for a new one. Don't buy a Kryptonite lock! I now use Abus Granit.

    The locks were redesigned about 4 years ago (it was a major scandal at the time) and no longer have the circular lock in question. Current top model Kryptonites compare favourably with Abus Granit X Plus locks.
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    The locks were redesigned about 4 years ago (it was a major scandal at the time) and no longer have the circular lock in question. Current top model Kryptonites compare favourably with Abus Granit X Plus locks.[/quote]

    If there was a scandal I didn't hear about it. Kryptonite never contacted me to tell me of the breathtaking deficiency with their lock. Still wouldn't buy another Kryptonite. AVOID. They cost me £700 for a replacement bike which I have been paying off in increased insurance premiums in the last few years. Abus are much better and preferably when used as a pair x2 Abus Granite X PLus 54 300mm locks, one for each hand.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    The scandal:
    Until 2004 Kryptonite locks used the tubular pin tumbler locking mechanism. In 2004, videos circulating on the Internet demonstrated that some tubular pin tumbler locks of the diameter used on Kryptonite locks could be easily opened with the shaft of an inexpensive ballpoint pen of matching diameter. Trade website BikeBiz.com revealed that the weaknesses of the tubular pin tumbler mechanism had first been described in 1992 by UK journalist John Stuart Clark[3]. For an article in New Cyclist magazine he teamed up with a bike thief to show how easy it was to break in to the majority of bicycle locks then on the market. One of the methods he revealed was the ballpoint pen method. His article led to follow-ups in bigger circulation bicycle magazines and a BBC TV consumer rights programme also carried a feature on the pen method. Some UK trade distributors of bicycle locks using the tumbler mechanism withdrew the products from the marketplace and introduced locks which were more pick-proof. Following BikeBiz.com's report about this 1992 knowledge of the pen method the lock-picking video received widespread attention by the mainstream media and after a few days of negative publicity the company responded with a lock exchange offer. However, lawyers in the US and Canada had already launched class actions against the Kryptonite Corporation, citing the 1992 revelations on BikeBiz.com Kryptonite Corporation later settled the claims out of court despite the fact the 1992 magazine article had not featured a Kryptonite lock and Kryptonite employees said they were unaware of the 1992 article.

    You may well have had a claim against them.

    I fully understand you cannot trust a brand that failed in such a big way (though other brands also used the same tumbler pin mechanism, Kryptonite was the highest profile). I wouldn't go back to them either if I had been burned...

    However, forgetting history, in tests the New York Lock performs about as well as the Abus Granit X-Plus. The New York uses a harder 16mm shackle, whereas the Abus uses a 13mm square section shackle. The latter cuts faster with power tools, but requires 2 cuts. In the C-Plus tests the Kryptonite lasted a few seconds longer to attack, but very little in it. I would be confident of either lock (currently using Abus, have used Kryptonite).
  • Weekend chores and 100 miles a week commuting - come rain, snow or hail (bloody hurts tho!). So around 3500 - 4000 miles in the 8 months I've had it. No major problems so far, although I appear to be getting through rear tyres like no tomorrow (marathons) lost 2 now to 2 inch gashes.
    Marathon Plus goes on tomorrow so I'm keeping my fingers crossed but I'm now paranoid that someone's made a stinger for bikes!! :roll:
  • I had an old kryptonite but also missed the problems with them.

    (Was taking a break from cycling after being knocked off on Denmark Hill).

    When I finally got my nerve back I discovered that my expensive lock was obsolete.

    I e.mailed kryptonite in the US and basically said I was buying a new lock (one for home - one for work) and would only buy another kryptonite if they replaced the one that I had already had (they did have a replacement programme in place for about a year immediatly after it became apparent their locks weren't secure).

    To summarise - they sent me a new lock so I now have two.

    Might be worth a try - although I did have to send them the old one - which you probably don't have seeing as your bike was nicked.
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