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Best place for bike insurance

ferretsferrets Posts: 12
edited March 2009 in Road beginners
just bought my first road bike. Its a specialized roubaix elite (0 i paid £1100.00 from my local bike shop, made enquiries with my house insurance about getting it insured but they came back with a silly quote. Any advice regarding who to insure with would be great. Thanks.

Posts

  • pbracingpbracing Posts: 231
    I changed my home insurance to Co-Op as they included bike cover as well (£1,500) for not much extra, if any. It was the excuse I was looking for to go with them.
    Why not? My bikes.
    Summer & dry days
    http://i396.photobucket.com/albums/pp47 ... /Trek1.jpg

    Wet winter days & going the shops runaround
    http://i396.photobucket.com/albums/pp47 ... rello1.jpg
  • FSR_XCFSR_XC Posts: 2,258
    Join British Cycling.

    Basic membership includes insurance and with Gold membership, you get a very comprehensive insurance policy.
    Stumpjumper FSR 09/10 Pro Carbon, Genesis Vapour CX20 ('17)Carbon, Rose Xeon CW3000 '14, Raleigh R50

    http://www.visiontrack.com
  • jswbajswba Posts: 491
    For future reference, my house insurance includes my bike (single items up to 1,500 quid in and out of the house) and is from the AA (they were actually among the cheapest when I did a market searech too). Worth looking into for when you renew.
  • might be worth seeing if your insurance covers you if you fall off your bike and break something.

    I'd imagine that a normal home contents policy will only cover your bike if it is stolen.

    I ended up going with ETA insurance - which also included third party and 'break down' cover....

    As I'm on a carbon bike, one big crash could mean a new frame, and my house contents certainly does not cover that.
    Mens agitat molem
  • sicrowsicrow Posts: 791
    I have mine on my house insurance (RBS) and have £3000 per item
  • fnegronifnegroni Posts: 794
    bazbadger wrote:
    might be worth seeing if your insurance covers you if you fall off your bike and break something.

    Exactly why I got that type of cover (including accident, and rescue service).

    I also have public liability to £1m
  • pbracingpbracing Posts: 231
    House contents does not cover accident/ crash damage. I asked for recommendations for insurers in cake stop last week.
    FSR- thanks for your info same as you put here. I looked into Brirish Cycling, but even on the gold level I couldn't find specific mention of crash cover (I'm sure they do). Also seemed a bit pricey for me with a £1,500 bike. Maybe if I was a racer with a £4k bike it would be better value.

    Do you know if the Every Day Cyclist insurance will cover for damage? I'm not a racer, so that side of the site is more applicable. Ta.
    Why not? My bikes.
    Summer & dry days
    http://i396.photobucket.com/albums/pp47 ... /Trek1.jpg

    Wet winter days & going the shops runaround
    http://i396.photobucket.com/albums/pp47 ... rello1.jpg
  • FSR_XCFSR_XC Posts: 2,258
    Had a brief look at the site. Does this help:

    http://www.britishcycling.org.uk/web/si ... cident.asp

    http://www.everydaycycling.com/edc/v2/m ... claim.aspx

    I know a couple of people that have claimed on the British Cycling insurance after getting knocked off. They have nothing but praise for the service they got.

    Membership benefits here:
    http://www.britishcycling.org.uk/web/si ... nefits.asp
    Stumpjumper FSR 09/10 Pro Carbon, Genesis Vapour CX20 ('17)Carbon, Rose Xeon CW3000 '14, Raleigh R50

    http://www.visiontrack.com
  • pbracingpbracing Posts: 231
    :? Doesn't help me really. Not being awkward, but am I missing something? The first link is about personal injury and the second is about accident compensation. Nothing about self inflicted (ie crash) damage cover for the bike. :?:
    Why not? My bikes.
    Summer & dry days
    http://i396.photobucket.com/albums/pp47 ... /Trek1.jpg

    Wet winter days & going the shops runaround
    http://i396.photobucket.com/albums/pp47 ... rello1.jpg
  • fnegronifnegroni Posts: 794
    TBH, I don't think you should be looking around too long.

    Before getting mine, I got three quotes online within minutes, and I chose the one that I liked the best.

    I don't think you are going to save that much money... in the meanwhile your bike is not insured.

    I got my insurance sorted before I even took delivery of the bike.
  • LagavulinLagavulin Posts: 1,742
    The Cycleguard policy, is it new for old?

    £447 a year premium it has suggested for a single bike valued at £3,000. That seems quite steep. My mate pays £700 per annum for his '04 plate Fiesta.
  • I have my £2000 bike insured as a specified item under the 'all risks' section of my household policy. Cost about £45pa extra. New for old and £50 excess applies. Main exclusion is use for competetive riding. Esure.

    Just had the misfortune to make a claim following a crash - £1150 + £200 or so for helmet/Garmin Edge 705/wristwatch. Esure sent cheques within 2 days of me submitting estimates/receipts.

    Highly recommended and service beyond compare.
    There's no such thing as too old.
  • i use e & l insurance fully covered for £56 pa check thier site
  • fnegronifnegroni Posts: 794
    Lagavulin wrote:
    The Cycleguard policy, is it new for old?

    £447 a year premium it has suggested for a single bike valued at £3,000. That seems quite steep. My mate pays £700 per annum for his '04 plate Fiesta.

    447 is quite steep I suppose.

    Get another quote from someone else.

    As I said, get three quotes (including one from your current home insurance provider if you have one) and get the best of the three.

    You can always cancel within 14/28 days if you find it cheaper later, and some offer cashback options if that's the case.

    For my needs, the cover and premium were fine.


    These are some tips from the Cycleguard website, which might help you compare the better quotes:

    https://www.jltonline.co.uk/secure/comp ... ode=107577
  • punkypossumpunkypossum Posts: 660
    I had my mtb insured with Cycleguard - with it only being worth about £350, the premiums were not too bad, but when I got the road bike it would have all ended up really expensive, so I switched my contents insurance over to Churchill. Now got both bikes included and better cover overall for pretty much the same I was paying before. And then I'm a member of CTC, so get the liability insurance, etc through them...
    One day, I'm going to buy a cottage in a small village and become its idiot!
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    I've been a bit of a bargin hunter, and although the replacement value of my stable is around 3.5K i only paid just over 2k for it over several years as an undergrad. I'm now a grad student, who would do decent insurance for such an expensive stable? I haven't found anyone with reasonable cover.
  • weedy1weedy1 Posts: 143
    E&L £132.50 a year with 3rd party liability AND breakdown/recovery thrown in for a 2K bike.
    Cycleguard is one of the most expensive out there IMO.
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,655
    My household cover the bike in the garage. At work it sits behind me so there's no scope for theft.

    Leaving me only needing accident cover.

    Best quote I had for that was around £130 on a £2 bike.

    Which is a joke considering my £6k Aygo costs me £110 a year fullly comp.
    My blog: http://www.roubaixcycling.cc (kit reviews and other musings)
    https://twitter.com/roubaixcc
    Facebook? No. Just say no.
  • fnegronifnegroni Posts: 794
    I chose cycleguard because there is no excess to pay.
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