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Build Me A Fixed/Singlespeed

tweenstertweenster Posts: 592
edited February 2009 in Road general
I was contemplating buying a fixed/singlespeed for my commute to my new job, and it would be something like the Specialized Langster or, my preference, the Lemond Fillimore. However, on doing some research into these bikes I've seen a few comments that you can build your own that would be better, for less. My problem is, I don't know the first thing about fixed/singlespeeds.

So, for a budget of £400, what would you suggest?

Ich bin ein IRONMAN!

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  • stickmanstickman Posts: 791
    Bikes, saddles and stuff

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    Gears - Obscuring the goodness of singlespeed
  • hugo15hugo15 Posts: 1,101
    I have just taken delivery of a Pearson Hanzo. Only managed a short spin on it so far due to the crappy weather but I was very pleased with it. It looks lovely too.
  • meagainmeagain Posts: 2,331
    If you are not comfoprtable with DIY (and if using new parts it is not good economics for anyone), then the best route by far is second hand. Lots (relative to numbers sold!) of fixeds and single speeds come on the market with very low miles: lots of folk think that the current fad is for them and very quickly find out just WHY gears and free wheels were invented!
    You will pick up a used Langster for 200 quid or less. Or a Tricross - far better suited to UK weather IMO! - for 50 quid more. IF you enjoy, invest what you've saved in a second, better, set of wheels.
    If you must DIY, just search/browse around Special Interests. Most "answers" are already here.
    d.j.
    "Cancel my subscription to the resurrection."
  • GarethPJGarethPJ Posts: 295
    You can build your own for less, but not with all new parts, if only because the markup on individual parts will add up to more than the markup on a whole new bike.
  • I was thinking similar last spring, but when I did the sums, it turned out cheaper to buy a sh langster than build my own. You could always cut yourself with a stanley knife and rub black chain gunk in for the full home build effect!
  • GarethPJGarethPJ Posts: 295
    I've built a few fixies and single speeds from used bikes over the years. I can usually do a decent fixie for around £100 all in, but I never manage to hold on to them for long. The problem is that there's always some sucker on ebay willing to pay almost twice that much.
  • I'm interested to know how people knock up a fixed for £100, just buting a fixed rear wheel comes in at £50-70. Or is it £100 + £100 of spares box goodies?
  • GarethPJGarethPJ Posts: 295
    My last one started with a Raleigh Criterium 12 for under a tenner. The new rear wheel was £55. Then there was a bottom bracket to get the chainline right. A pair of NOS tyres in blue and yellow to match the frame. A sprocket and a chain and that was all the spending. A general service and cleanup cost nothing. Removing the braze ons was free too. Total spend in that case was £105 IIRC, including and postage costs. After ebay fees that bike realized £185.

    It rode really well and it was sized exactly right for me, but the temptation to sell was just too strong.
  • mattsccmmattsccm Posts: 401
    Assuming you are not using your cassette wheels and a single speed kit (which may be part of many peoples cheap version) I think its easy to get wheels. Look about for old screw on thread road wheels. Try a trad bike shop. I was but Campag/Mavic wheels at a tenner a pair just to get the tubs. 1 Record hubbed wheel plus a fixed sprocket will do the job. Just a re dish maybe.
  • shedheadshedhead Posts: 367
    How about an On One Pompino?

    I have one i do 200 miles a week on to work, all year round, any weather, it'll take whatever censored you throw at it & you can fit mudguards & it'll take 35 tyres.

    There's one on ebay at the mo' starting at £300 & they don't go for much more than that if any.

    :)
    'Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts'.
  • majormantramajormantra Posts: 2,094
    mattsccm wrote:
    Assuming you are not using your cassette wheels and a single speed kit (which may be part of many peoples cheap version) I think its easy to get wheels. Look about for old screw on thread road wheels. Try a trad bike shop. I was but Campag/Mavic wheels at a tenner a pair just to get the tubs. 1 Record hubbed wheel plus a fixed sprocket will do the job. Just a re dish maybe.

    It'll work, but if you're buying a new wheel anyway you might as well choose the safer option of a proper fixed hub that will take a lockring. You can certainly get away with not having one but the lockring option is definitely preferable for the road.

    Matthew
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