Removing old glue from tubular rims

andyp
andyp Posts: 10,101
edited March 2009 in Road general
I figure this'd be the best section to ask this question. I've recently picked up an old pair of track wheels that haven't been used for 20 years or so. I've cleaned them up and they look as good as new but I now want to remove the old glue from the rims.

I've started with acetone but the glue is pretty thick and it'll take weeks at this rate. The rims are anodised aluminium so would something like Nitromors be suitable? If not, what else could I use?

Thanks.

Comments

  • mattsccm
    mattsccm Posts: 409
    i think acaetone is the accepted way inless you start scraping which may be hard if acetone has softened them. Having said that I would leave some on there as it will save you giving them more than one coat.. Planning on using tape? maybe more will have to come off. Nitomors may well screw the annodising.
  • GibboGT
    GibboGT Posts: 287
    I don't see why you couldn't soak them for a bit? if you have access to enough acetone to be able to soak them? and you may obviously need to do it a portion of the wheel at a time.

    (i'd be a bit wary of recommending anyone to use acetone as it is actually toxic to an extent, and can cause future health issues.)

    If I were you maybe buy some cheap screen wash from halfords or something and soak the glue for a bit in that, its a similar thing, often isopropyl alcohol or something.
  • GarethPJ
    GarethPJ Posts: 295
    The smell of acetone gives me the shivers. A bloke at work once needed a bit of sheet steel for a job and decided to cut it out of an old drum. It was an "empty" acetone drum, well it was still wet and full of fumes. He decided to cut it with an angle grinder. 'Nuff said?

    Anyway the glue isn't usually so hard that you can't take the majority of it off carefully with a good, solid, sharp knife and then use a solvent to take away the remainder.
  • ride_whenever
    ride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    GibboGT wrote:
    i'd be a bit wary of recommending anyone to use acetone as it is actually toxic to an extent, and can cause future health issues

    TOSH

    Acetone risk codes are R11, 33, 66, 67: highly flammable (dur) irritating to eyes (I can attest to that) repeated exposure can cause dryness or cracking of the skin (sort of, but you'd need to soak for a while from my experience) vapours cause drowsiness/dizziness (yup)

    (I checked the sigma website, but the forum doesn't like the web address)
  • Toonraid
    Toonraid Posts: 126
    Velox do a specific cleaner for rim glue.
  • GibboGT
    GibboGT Posts: 287

    TOSH

    Acetone risk codes are R11, 33, 66, 67: highly flammable (dur) irritating to eyes (I can attest to that) repeated exposure can cause dryness or cracking of the skin (sort of, but you'd need to soak for a while from my experience) vapours cause drowsiness/dizziness (yup)

    (I checked the sigma website, but the forum doesn't like the web address)

    I'm not saying that it'll kill you, but R phrases do not cover all eventualities.

    Acetone can cause damage to the kidneys, and can promote the early onset of diabetes. Obviously through long term exposure, but still.

    Ethyl acetate would be the best thing to use, that is non toxic, and what a lot of nail varnish removers have switched to using from acetone.
  • Eddy S
    Eddy S Posts: 1,013
    Acetone takes far too long, especially on very old, age hardened glue.

    On aluminium rims try white spirit – it’s great for bulk glue removal or if you need something a bit stronger because of the age of the glue, try petrol – just make sure that you’re wearing protective gloves.

    Save the acetone for the final clean up and prep for new glue/tubs.
    I’m a sprinter – I warmed up yesterday.
  • I recently used, with great success, white spirit to remove tub glue from a pair of 1981 Mavic SSC tubulars. Just make sure you do it in a well ventilated area to keep the head clear!
  • meagain
    meagain Posts: 2,331
    Thinners (is that acetone?)/white spirit and wire wool.
    d.j.
    "Cancel my subscription to the resurrection."
  • andyp
    andyp Posts: 10,101
    Thanks all. Looks like white spirit is the way to go. I'll give it a go at the weekend.
  • KM2
    KM2 Posts: 147
    We used to use Petrol many years ago.

    If the glue is brittle find a half round chisel of the same diameter and scrape it of. Don't use a straight chisel as it scours the alloy.
  • Flambes
    Flambes Posts: 191
    Just been trying the same on some Pinarello sprint rims I got from ebay.
    White spirt - didn't touch it.
    Turps - maybe a bit, would take 30 years or so to do.
    Acetone subsutute ( the wife's nail ploish remover) - best yet, but would still take ages.

    So I'll probably try some real acetone, then some petrol.

    Park tools website even suggests paint stripper, but that sounds rather extreme, and the rims have very nice blue decals I don't want to spoil.

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=101
  • tatanab
    tatanab Posts: 1,283
    I used a Dremel tool with the sanding disc - it is like a rubber bung about 1/2inch long with removable sandpaper cover. It does the job magnificently, if messily. There was old glue dust flying everywhere and the sandpaper only lasted for one wheel before it got too clogged. The diameter of the rubber/sandpaper is pretty much perfect for running along the rim. As a bonus, it keys the rim surface nicely too.
  • Are we right in assuming that this is ordinary tub glue and not shellac? If shellac, as this is made with meths, perhaps this may be the answer.

    Other stuff - I'd go with cellulose thinners.
    AT MY AGE, I SHOULD KNOW BETTER !!!
  • mattsccm
    mattsccm Posts: 409
    Track wheels should have been shellac
  • Flambes
    Flambes Posts: 191
    Petrol! :D

    Does the trick better than anything. 10 mins just now and half the first rim is clear of glue.
    Feeling a bit wibbly though, so giving it a rest for a while.

    Wibble.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Paint stripper usually contain Dichloromethane, which is a common hydrocarbon and solvent and would certainly remove old glue from alloy rims. However, DO NOT use on carbon rims. Other alternatives include Xylene and White Spirit
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..