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Saddles!

biondinobiondino Posts: 5,990
edited October 2008 in The workshop
Saddles! There's an almost infinite choice, prices from virtually nothing to lots and lots, and yet we all have different bums, so what works for one might not work for the next.

So how do we figure out what to buy? Is there a scientific method? I notice that some saddles come in a variety of widths which, if I knew the formula, might help me work out which one would suit me. But I don't.

You *can* big up your own saddle here if you'd recommend it, but you have to say why.

Posts

  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,496
    Specialized has a sort of saddle fit system where you sit on a pad of sorts and your butt
    leaves an impression in it. This is then measured and you buy the corresponding Spec' saddle, which matches your butt dents. I have sat on the "pad" but not bought a saddle
    because I don't need one. Might be worth a try - can't hurt. I'm becoming a fan of the, so
    called, sit bone saddles although the ones with cutouts suit me fairly well also. I don't
    get numb with either. The sit bone one took a bit to get used to and set at the right angle
    to suit me but works just fine. Good luck. It can be a long seach and in the end I doubt
    any of them will be "perfect".

    Dennis Noward
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    biondino wrote:
    we all have different bums,
    I only have the one myself.

    Worzel Bummage might have a few different bums.
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    dennisn wrote:
    Specialized has a sort of saddle fit system where you sit on a pad of sorts and your butt
    leaves an impression in it. This is then measured and you buy the corresponding Spec' saddle, which matches your butt dents. I have sat on the "pad" but not bought a saddle
    because I don't need one. Might be worth a try - can't hurt. I'm becoming a fan of the, so
    called, sit bone saddles although the ones with cutouts suit me fairly well also. I don't
    get numb with either. The sit bone one took a bit to get used to and set at the right angle
    to suit me but works just fine. Good luck. It can be a long seach and in the end I doubt
    any of them will be "perfect".

    Dennis Noward

    The specialized thing is a bit of a gimic, in the sense that there is "normal bum" and "freak bum" and everyone measures as "normal bum", except for the odd freak.

    Its a good idea in principle, but its still early days and it doesn't appear to be economically viable to make a sensible range of sizes.

    I wish I could remember the manuracturer, but I'm sure I saw a cutout saddle you could adjust the width of once. Of course, it weighed more than 300g so no serious roadie would buy one.
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,496
    dennisn wrote:
    Specialized has a sort of saddle fit system where you sit on a pad of sorts and your butt
    leaves an impression in it. This is then measured and you buy the corresponding Spec' saddle, which matches your butt dents. I have sat on the "pad" but not bought a saddle
    because I don't need one. Might be worth a try - can't hurt. I'm becoming a fan of the, so
    called, sit bone saddles although the ones with cutouts suit me fairly well also. I don't
    get numb with either. The sit bone one took a bit to get used to and set at the right angle
    to suit me but works just fine. Good luck. It can be a long seach and in the end I doubt
    any of them will be "perfect".

    Dennis Noward

    The specialized thing is a bit of a gimic, in the sense that there is "normal bum" and "freak bum" and everyone measures as "normal bum", except for the odd freak.

    Its a good idea in principle, but its still early days and it doesn't appear to be economically viable to make a sensible range of sizes.

    I wish I could remember the manuracturer, but I'm sure I saw a cutout saddle you could adjust the width of once. Of course, it weighed more than 300g so no serious roadie would buy one.

    You're not wrong. I had one for a while. Can't remember the name though. Seemed to be too flexy, hard to adjust, and squeaked. Gave it to a friend of mine and I think he still uses it. What was it called? :? :?

    Dennis Noward
  • chuckcorkchuckcork Posts: 1,471
    FWIW, I have a variety on my bikes, which I find works based on what they are being ridden for.

    The hard racing saddle is fine but for shorter distances as I can get a very sore bum after a while. That is on my commuting bike.

    The gel saddle is good for a few hours and is on my audax/winter/distance bike, but I reserve that for riding around town over shorter distances.

    The Brooks B17 I have is a bit deeper in section and so can rub on the thoughs slightly (should have got a racing saddle, next time?) but is broader at the rear and gives good support to the bum and is very comfortable, and which I use now for training runs and sportive type rides on my audax etc bike by preference.

    I have had specialised saddle on one of my (Specialized) bikes previously, I chucked it as it had a lot of foam padding that was brilliant for soaking up rain and then releasing it...
    'Twas Mulga Bill, from Eaglehawk, that caught the cycling craze....
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    chuckcork wrote:
    The Brooks B17 I have is a bit deeper in section and so can rub on the thoughs slightly (should have got a racing saddle, next time?) but is broader at the rear and gives good support to the bum and is very comfortable, and which I use now for training runs and sportive type rides on my audax etc bike by preference.

    You can fit laces to the sides of your brooks by punching a few holes and tying underneath so that the sides are pulled in, this may resolve the thigh-rubbing issue. Some models have this as standard I think.
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    I'm a big fan of the fizik saddles, very small amount of padding but a very flexible shell.
  • unclemalcunclemalc Posts: 563
    biondino wrote:
    Saddles! There's an almost infinite choice, prices from virtually nothing to lots and lots, and yet we all have different bums, so what works for one might not work for the next.

    So how do we figure out what to buy? Is there a scientific method? I notice that some saddles come in a variety of widths which, if I knew the formula, might help me work out which one would suit me. But I don't.

    You *can* big up your own saddle here if you'd recommend it, but you have to say why.

    IME, apart from your bum shape and size there is also a need to consider what type of riding you're doing, how long for and how heavy you are. Sorry, biondino...!!

    I am about 80Kilos in weight at the mo'.
    I tried the Brooks B17-type and it isn't much good if you're on the drops of a racer but for commuting on a straight bar bike its great. It does flex tho' so you need to 'maintain' it.

    The Charge 'Spoon' is a brilliant cheap thing that I use for training both on a roadie and on the 'sit-up-and-beg' commuter. IMO if I was 75K (or even 70K :D ) then it would be THE saddle for me.
    Recently I started using one of these. . http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgur ... n%26sa%3DG
    Looks wierd but it's like the thing Mark Beamont cycled around the world on. I found it pretty comfy over a long ride on the roadie.

    Regardless of saddle, saddle cream or pad, I think that over a longer time, say ~2-3 hours, the 'pound per sq inch' pressure on the tender bits really tells if you're on the heavy side. I have not been tempted to spend big money on a saddle until I am lighter....For me, that weight on the saddle is the key thing I am aiming to reduce, so that riding long distances is less of a (literal) pain.

    Hope that helped... :wink:
    Spring!
    Singlespeeds in town rule.
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