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Putting tyre back on a wheel

markybhoy67markybhoy67 Posts: 346
edited November 2008 in The workshop
Looking for some advice please

I ripped the valve on my inner tubing whilst inflating it :oops:

I have Schwalbe marathon pluses which everybody knows are a censored to get off but even harder to get back on :twisted:

Right here's the thing I use the tyre levers to get the tyre off of the rim but when I go to put the tyre back on there gets to a point where I have to use the tyre levers to get the tyre back on BUT according to some bike websites using tyre levers to get a tyrel back on is a big NO NO

Can anyone shed any light on this as there is no way I could get the tyre back on by hand.

Thanks

Mark

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    some times you just have to use the levers.

    Just take care not to catch the tube.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • dondaredondare Posts: 2,113
    Here's a couple of tips.

    Firstly, put the tyre on the rim without the inner tube; it'll be a lot easier and you can use tyre levers if necessary. Then remove it again, and put it back. It should be easier the second time. Then remove it again and put it back with the inner tube without using the levers.
    Use cable-ties to keep the tyre in place as you go round the rim, so that when you ease the last bit on it doesn't pop off somewhere else.
    This post contains traces of nuts.
  • nicklouse wrote:
    some times you just have to use the levers.

    Just take care not to catch the tube.

    Thanks nicklouse, thats what I thought as there is just no way to do this by hand.

    Noted about catching the tube.
  • dondare wrote:
    Here's a couple of tips.

    Firstly, put the tyre on the rim without the inner tube; it'll be a lot easier and you can use tyre levers if necessary. Then remove it again, and put it back. It should be easier the second time. Then remove it again and put it back with the inner tube without using the levers.
    Use cable-ties to keep the tyre in place as you go round the rim, so that when you ease the last bit on it doesn't pop off somewhere else.

    Cheers dondare, very good suggestion, will keep that in mind.

    Thanks
  • What about something like this?

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/Cycle/7/Park_ ... 360013543/

    Although I would prefer it to be a bit cheaper that that :lol::lol::lol:
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    What about something like this?

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/Cycle/7/Park_ ... 360013543/

    Although I would prefer it to be a bit cheaper that that :lol::lol::lol:

    No. that tool is not for fitting tyres. it is for helping seat the bead on the rim after fitting.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • dondaredondare Posts: 2,113
    If nothing else works.

    Before I discovered SMPs I had to change tyres quite frequently and I developed great strength in my fingers and could remove and replace a tyre without using levers at all.
    This post contains traces of nuts.
  • nicklouse wrote:
    What about something like this?

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/Cycle/7/Park_ ... 360013543/

    Although I would prefer it to be a bit cheaper that that :lol::lol::lol:

    No. that tool is not for fitting tyres. it is for helping seat the bead on the rim after fitting.

    Oh thanks for that, I must have read it wrong as I thought it was for fitting.

    Just saved me some money as I was looking to see where I could get the cheapest price for this 8)

    Is there a tool that can do the job of getting the tyre over the rim?

    Cheers
  • dondare wrote:
    If nothing else works.

    Before I discovered SMPs I had to change tyres quite frequently and I developed great strength in my fingers and could remove and replace a tyre without using levers at all.

    LOL, I will need to bulk up on spinach the now as there is no way I could do this yet :lol:
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    http://www.parktool.com/products/detail ... item=TL-10

    but i would just practice. with no tube fitted.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • nicklouse wrote:
    http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=17&item=TL-10

    but i would just practice. with no tube fitted.

    Thanks again

    Will try and practice first then.

    Cheers
  • coffeecupcoffeecup Posts: 128
    I carry one of these.

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/cra ... r-ec006932

    One end fixes to the axle of your wheel while you rotate it around the tyre rim

    It gets the tyre on and off pretty quick, but I'm on a road bike and can get it back on by hand if stuck
    Time you've enjoyed wasting, hasn't been wasted

    Bianchi L'Una, Bianchi 928 C2C 105, Dahon MU SL
  • feelfeel Posts: 800
    when you have the inner tube back on, put some air in the tube - use your tyre lever but finish at the valve and when you flip the last bit over push the valve in a little way to move the tube away from the rim and so avoid it being nipped. If you are doing it at home i would guess that putting the tyre in a bowl of hot water first might make it go over the rim more easily or use some washing up liquid as a lubricant (wash it off afterwards mind or stopping the first time afterwards might beinteresting :wink: )
    We are born with the dead:
    See, they return, and bring us with them.
  • Cheers for the replies

    Brute force in the end done it for me

    I have two sets of tire levers, sona and park

    I find the sona is good for getting the wheel over the rim but for whatever reason the sona doesn't seem to work well when trying to slide the lever round the rim to get all the wheel off, the park one works very well for this.

    So I carry one of each in my saddle bag now 8)
  • fossyantfossyant Posts: 2,549
    Talc the tube and inside of tyre - makes life easy..... !!
  • wgwarburtonwgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    Don't forget to drop the bead into the channel between the "shoulders" that it usually sits on before pushing it over the rim.

    Aim to roll the last bit over by the valve. Before doing so, ease the part of the bead that is diametrically opposite the valve (and on the same side of the wheel that you are working on) into the channel where the spoke nipples live, so that it is closer to the centre of the wheel. That way there is some slack to use at the other side. Once the bead is over you can work your way back round the rim ensuring it is seated evenly on the shoulder again.

    Cheers,
    W.
  • Cheers guys, some really use full info there.

    Although hopefully no more changing tires for a while :lol:
  • El GordoEl Gordo Posts: 394
    It's about this point that someone usually turns up claiming never to have used a tyre lever and rides 700c wheels with 26" tyres fitted using only their teeth (or some thing along those lines).

    Personally I quite often use a lever for getting tyres back on but try not to rotate the lever past horizontal (assuming the wheel is upright) which should avoid pinching.
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    I find that the easiest way to get them off is by starting at the valve, and for re-fitting them, start at the valve. I usually fit the tyre with the tube in it as a single unit, this way you can completely avoid pinching the inner tube.
  • Have you tried treating the tyre like a tubular and give it a good stretch?

    If you're at home, tie the tyre up and put it in a slow oven to expand the bead.
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