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why do you change your bike for winter training ?

northernneilnorthernneil Posts: 1,549
edited October 2008 in The bottom bracket
I understand if its wet and you need mud guards but otherwise why would you want to use a worse bike ?

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  • FastladFastlad Posts: 908
    well, let me explain.....basically, why would you want to ride a good bike in foul weather or when the roads have been gritted? it only helps to knacker the bearings, chain, cables etc, etc. hence the term 'winter hack' I, however, have a lovely winter bike. A trek 1200 frame with full ultegra, compact chaiset, mavic aksium wheels, full mudguards, rack, ritchey wcs bars & stem, carbon seatpost and a natty little rack on the back to carry my new gore paclite!!!!! So, all in all, not that bad really :lol:
  • I understand if its wet and you need mud guards but otherwise why would you want to use a worse bike ?

    Depends how keen your local council are on putting lots of salt on the roads in the winter, which is usually bad news for aluminium alloy parts and steel chains & sprockets, unless you're willing to wash the bike on a very regular basis.
    Also, to get the maximum benefit from 'guards, best to go for full-length rather than Raceblade-style ones, which means opting for a frame with extra clearance and so a more 'relaxed' design which may not be as nippy for summer riding and racing.

    David
    "It is not enough merely to win; others must lose." - Gore Vidal
  • When I was an active racer, my winter bike and summer hack bike were no different.
    I used to go on summer clubruns on the race bike.
    Remember that you are an Englishman and thus have won first prize in the lottery of life.
  • The winter bike used to be a fixed wheel with clearance for mudguards. Less to go wrong.

    Can't see the point now.
  • chuckcorkchuckcork Posts: 1,471
    Taking the word "change" literally, I have changed my "summer" commuting bike into my "winter" commuting bike, by adding some 3 metres of scotchlite to it after a thorough clean, installing 2 taillights, adding my dynamo hub and lights and so on.

    I'll be riding in pitch black so need all the help I can get to see and be seen.

    When it comes to mudguards they are on in any case, full length SKS (my bike has the attachment points for them, and I find it easier when wearing glasses)

    My Sunday bike BTW will have the dynamo wheel and a light put on as necessary for when it is a bit foggy and we need more visibility when out.
    'Twas Mulga Bill, from Eaglehawk, that caught the cycling craze....
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Yeah - what they said - and hey - its an excuse to have ANOTHER bike ? Obvious eh ?
  • I don't change the bike. Maybe I just clean it more frequently, though since I started XC skiing last year, that's debatable too.
  • hehehehehe

    excuse for a new bike

    nice one !
  • 1) cheaper components to be exposed to road salt and muck
    2) heavier bike = better training - feels awesome when you dig the best bike out again in spring
    3) snow/ice/leaves = more chance of crashing. I'd rather risk the cheapy bike
    4) I can't be bothered transferring all the light mounts to a different bike :)
    I understand if its wet and you need mud guards but otherwise why would you want to use a worse bike ?
    I don't use mudguards so that's about the only non-reason for using the winter bike!
  • SSE's point 2) is the key one for me. The winter bike is meant to be heavy and slow and helps to mentally set aside the part of the year when you're doing long slow base miles. I'm actually quite excited about getting my hack out after my last race of the year this weekend. :D
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I use my fixie in winter.

    Its got mudguards - something I didnt fully appreciate until I bit the bullet after about 20 years of cycling.

    Its got LEDs and lights on.

    Its got reflective strip on for night riding.

    Its fun to ride.

    Less to clean/go wrong.

    Its different from my race bike.

    And if you only had one bike - what happens if you bust something. You may miss out on a weeks riding. You always need more than one.
  • mrushtonmrushton Posts: 5,182
    cougie wrote:
    I use my fixie in winter.

    Its got mudguards - something I didnt fully appreciate until I bit the bullet after about 20 years of cycling.

    Its got LEDs and lights on.

    Its got reflective strip on for night riding.

    Its fun to ride.

    Less to clean/go wrong.

    Its different from my race bike.

    And if you only had one bike - what happens if you bust something. You may miss out on a weeks riding. You always need more than one.

    +1
    M.Rushton
  • SSE's point 2) is the key one for me. The winter bike is meant to be heavy and slow and helps to mentally set aside the part of the year when you're doing long slow base miles. I'm actually quite excited about getting my hack out after my last race of the year this weekend. :D

    I disagree with this point totally. A bike used in the winter needn't be a 25lb monster.
    I can see your point about the base miles, but by having something not "heavy and slow" I think you can argue that you get more effective base miles in.

    for instance our club runs in the winter are generally 85 to 100 miles, if you are grovelling up a moorland climb into a block headwind on a heavy bike then you are requiring a huge amount more effort than on a lighter bike.

    I have used both heavier winter bikes and now an old carbon frame is my winter steed. Riding the carbon is more likely to ensure I get the miles in.
  • The winter bike is meant to be heavy and slow and helps to mentally set aside the part of the year when you're doing long slow base miles

    I disagree with this point totally. A bike used in the winter needn't be a 25lb monster.
    I can see your point about the base miles, but by having something not "heavy and slow" I think you can argue that you get more effective base miles in


    aye...I dunno about 'meant to be heavy and slow', it just is. A nice light winter bike would be nice but then it'd cost more!
  • nwallacenwallace Posts: 1,465
    It's simply an excuse for having more than 1 bike
    Do Nellyphants count?

    Commuter: FCN 9
    Cheapo Roadie: FCN 5
    Off Road: FCN 11

    +1 when I don't get round to shaving for x days
  • TiBoyTiBoy Posts: 366
    The wife is starting to see through my excuse of a bike for different conditions, "of course you need a different bike for different types of rain dear" is a recent one that managed to get passed her.
    I do use an Ridgeback Horizon with 8 speed Sora in the winter mainly because the groupset appears very tough and in 3000+ miles has only needed 1 new chain and a new brake cable, I can't see my 10 speed lasting that long in the winter weather. Also its a heavier bike, my logic here is that I don't/can't go out for as long in the winter and a heavy bike makes me work harder (or so the wife thinks)
    Sunday September Ultegra SL
    Raleigh and BSA single speed
    Specialised Rockhopper comp disc
    And some others
  • swagmanswagman Posts: 115
    I ride with full mudguards all year round, seems to make sense with this countrys weather, cant see why other racers dont, too uncool???
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    It doesnt rain that much swagman ? Bikes do look cooler without mudguards - but my winter bike is set up with them. If it rains in the summer - its not usually cold - so its no problem. Each to their own.
  • I wouldn't ride my Felt F4 through the Welsh lanes in winter thanks
    I'll be using my 1st bike, 4 years old and my steel fixed Pompino

    If I play my cards right I'll have an excuse next year to both build another fixed and as i'm planning on doing RR then It'll be difficult to convert the TT bike to RR every week so a new bike will be a must 8)
    http://twitter.com/mgalex
    www.ogmorevalleywheelers.co.uk

    10TT 24:36 25TT: 57:59 50TT: 2:08:11, 100TT: 4:30:05 12hr 204.... unfinished business
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Most people I know use their 'retired' race bikes as winter trainers. IME good quality kit last better in winter than the cheap stuff - I have 15 year old components still in regular use.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • I'm sorting a winter bike out this year so I have no excuse not to get out.
    "A cyclist has nothing to lose but his chain"

    PTP Runner Up 2015
  • I take the racing bike out when the weather is OK and the training bike out when the weather is bad. The training bike is heavier and more solid. That's about the only reason. The training is not better or worse, in reality.
  • Surely a heavier bike doesnt give better training, you just go slower for the same power output? I guess there is a psychological benefit when you switch back.
  • I ride with full mudguards all year round, seems to make sense with this countrys weather, cant see why other racers dont, too uncool???

    don't know about other people, for me it's not a matter of 'cool', they're just pointless. I don't have anything attached to my bike which I don't need.
  • nickwillnickwill Posts: 2,735
    My winter bike has a scratched and battered frame, a mix of old components and a solid but cheapish Aksium wheelset. My best bike is kept immaculate, has a newish groupset, and good light wheels.
    If anything gets worn or damaged on the winter bike it doesn't matter as much, and won't cost much to replace. Next summer, my current Summer frame will be demoted to winter use,and the components will be moved across to a new frame.
    As regards mudguards, my winter bike has race blades, because it is an old race bike without clearances for full guards. I wouldn't dream of putting mudguards on my summer bike. It would be like putting a roof rack on a sports car.
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