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Cycling Books

nutter_bednutter_bed Posts: 87
edited September 2008 in Road beginners
Hi

Can anyone recommend any good cycling books for me to read when I go away on holiday soon?

Thanks in advance :)

Posts

  • The one about the TDF by Johnny Greene, not sure what it's called. His book 'a riot of our own' about life on the road with the Clash is better, not much cycling in it though

    also the Death of Marco Pantani, though it gets a bit like a chemistry lesson
  • Read a few , Pantnis does indeed get a bit of a yawn toward the end, Lance Armstrongs today I bought Geoff Thomas Riding through the Storm, thoroughly recommend Rough Ride read on hols in 3 days Good Stuff

    PUT ME BACK ON MY BIKE: IN SEARCH OF TOM SIMPSON

    Rough Ride - Paul Kimmage
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    markmcaree reviews a classic, and now updated, book about the life of a Tour domestique in the '80s, and the shady world of drug taking that sometimes surrounded the sport. As relevant now as it was shocking then.

    Rough Ride by Paul Kimmage

    This is a book notorious for one thing, Kimmage’s frank discussion about drugs in the peloton and how, in his opinion, the UCI allowed drug abuse to exist. However, its not the sole topic of the book, its also an excellent illustration of the harsh reality of life as a domestique in the peloton.
  • Jez monJez mon Posts: 3,809
    Johnny Greene book is called "Push yourself just a little bit more". I would also recommend it, it's a good read, although personally I don't agree with some of his views, I think he describes the tour de france wonderfully.

    The Lance Armstrong ones are generally OK, but I might face a bit of flack for saying that, but I think they are quite well written and quite inspirational.

    The Escape Artist by Matt Seaton is quite good too.
    You live and learn. At any rate, you live
  • jswbajswba Posts: 491
    There have been a few threads on this in the past

    Tim Krabbe's The Rider is (deservedly) mentioned frequently as are William Fotherington's books, Matt Rendell's (although not his TdF one; his biography of Marco Pantani is magnificent IMO) and those mentioned above.
  • gtitimgtitim Posts: 225
    French Revolutions by Tim Moore - this is quite honestly the funniest book i'ver ever read and highly inspirational from a cycling perspective. You must read this book - you'll thanks me for it.
  • On my last holiday I read The Hour - by Michael Hutchinson and enjoyed it.
    Its about Hutchinson chaotic first attempt on the hour record, with lots of insight into the history of the hour record and those that have held it.

    Good read
    check out the reviews http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hour-Michael-Hutchinson/dp/0224075195
  • phreakphreak Posts: 2,691
    In Search of Robert Millar is good, as is the recent book about Chris Hoy.
  • gtitimgtitim Posts: 225
    MIsterGoof wrote:
    On my last holiday I read The Hour - by Michael Hutchinson and enjoyed it.
    Its about Hutchinson chaotic first attempt on the hour record, with lots of insight into the history of the hour record and those that have held it.

    Good read
    check out the reviews http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hour-Michael-Hutchinson/dp/0224075195

    I too read this on my last holiday. A good read and quite humorous too. If you enjoyed that you will love French Revolutions.
  • Breaking the Chain - very enlightening!
  • Flying Scotsman is good & probalby one of the most honest books I have ever read.
  • MIsterGoof wrote:
    On my last holiday I read The Hour - by Michael Hutchinson and enjoyed it.

    Good read
    check out the reviews http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hour-Michael-Hutchinson/dp/0224075195

    Yeah I second this. It's brilliantly witty and self depricating. Hutchinson really knows his stuff IMHO and it made me laugh out loud on dozens of occassions (you can't say that about many cycling book :roll: ). I didn't realise he was such a good writer as well as a very talented tester.
    'How can an opinion be bullsh1t?' High Fidelity
  • Breaking the Chain - very enlightening!

    +1 for this...... pretty freaky actually. Surely a good way to make you think about how much really goes on. its an honest (well I think so) account of being part of festina before and during the time when the Sh** hit the fan.
  • i read greaham obree's book which is a great read but can be a bit sad.
    i also rate micheal hutchinsons book and others seem to agree
  • Richards Bicycle Book - mainly a maintenance manual, but very entertaining.

    Not sure it's still available though
  • I'll third or fourth the recommendation for "The Hour" by Michael Hutchinson, very funny and illuminating about what it takes to reach the top.
  • Jez mon wrote:
    The Lance Armstrong ones are generally OK, but I might face a bit of flack for saying that, but I think they are quite well written and quite inspirational.

    Ok, I'll take you up on that... fair play to him for what he went through and then winning 7 Tours, and showing what one can achieve in the face of seemingly insumountable odds, but his writing is awful! "sometimes I'd just be thinking about death, 'Chris!' I'd say, 'I'm thinking about death!'".... or "sometimes it'd make me so angry, 'Ah! I'm angry' I'd say".... or "we used to train by riding up the Col every day and there were never any cars. Then this one time, we went up the Col and there was a car"... or "My wife Kirstin is a total stud. 'Kik' I said, 'you're a total stud'"...etc. find a better co-author/editor Lance
    ________________________________
    Roadie: Focus Cayo - FCN 4
    Commuter hack: Fixed Langster - FCN 5
    Winter hack: Battered Sirrus - FCN 9
  • Jez monJez mon Posts: 3,809
    OK I'll rephrase, they're very easy to read! As opposed to the Death of Marco Pantani, which had quite a few characters and also quite a bit of science. Lance's "co" author manages to get the point across easily, so sure, it's not Pulitzer Prize winning writing, but it doesn't require any real brain engagement which is always a plus!
    You live and learn. At any rate, you live
  • Jez mon wrote:
    OK I'll rephrase, they're very easy to read! As opposed to the Death of Marco Pantani, which had quite a few characters and also quite a bit of science. Lance's "co" author manages to get the point across easily, so sure, it's not Pulitzer Prize winning writing, but it doesn't require any real brain engagement which is always a plus!

    I'm not an LA fan (don't start, it's just my opinion :wink: ) but 'Tour De Force' (Matt Rendell)was excellant. Less 'bum licky' than the others. More suspense, I thought. Got to see more of the 'real' Lance (if that's possible)too.
    'How can an opinion be bullsh1t?' High Fidelity
  • gtitimgtitim Posts: 225
    Jez mon wrote:
    OK I'll rephrase, they're very easy to read! As opposed to the Death of Marco Pantani, which had quite a few characters and also quite a bit of science. Lance's "co" author manages to get the point across easily, so sure, it's not Pulitzer Prize winning writing, but it doesn't require any real brain engagement which is always a plus!

    +1 I agree, the LA books are incredibly easy to read and full of useful tips.
  • Tim Krabbe's The Rider

    and if it's still around 'fat man on a bicycle'
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    fatfreddy wrote:
    Tim Krabbe's The Rider

    and if it's still around 'fat man on a bicycle'

    both good, also the Robert Millar one. A couple more would be:

    One more kilometre and we're in the showers - Tim Hilton. A history of british club cycling. You can skim the denser bits if you want but you have to read the account of Eileen Sheridan's 1953 non-stop End to End. She did it in about 3 days with 6 hours sleep. Incredible.

    Journey to the Centre of the Earth - Nicholas Crane (and his cousin) a great account of an amazing cycle tour.

    also, any of those lavish coffee table books about the Grands Cols of the TDF - I have several. Just browsing them gives you itchy cleats.


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • pneumatic wrote:
    ... I have several. Just browsing them gives you itchy cleats.

    Do you need a cream for that? :)
    ________________________________
    Roadie: Focus Cayo - FCN 4
    Commuter hack: Fixed Langster - FCN 5
    Winter hack: Battered Sirrus - FCN 9
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    pneumatic wrote:
    ... I have several. Just browsing them gives you itchy cleats.

    Do you need a cream for that? :)

    Highland Cream, Bristol Cream or Baileys Irish Cream are supposed to be good for coffee table cyclist's itch.

    Personally, though, I use any tincture that has "Single Malt" listed in the ingredients. :lol:


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • pneumatic wrote:
    [Personally, though, I use any tincture that has "Single Malt" listed in the ingredients. :lol:

    I like your style sir. Someone should do a book on a cycle tour around the Distilleries. I know Ian Banks did one a few years ago in a clapped out Defender, or classic sports car, can't remember. But that should really be updated for the discerning cyclist. I've already started background research on the subject matter :)
    ________________________________
    Roadie: Focus Cayo - FCN 4
    Commuter hack: Fixed Langster - FCN 5
    Winter hack: Battered Sirrus - FCN 9
  • knedlickyknedlicky Posts: 3,097
    Anyone able to recommend or say anything about 'Sex, Lies and Handlebar Tape'?

    I was wondering whether to order it. It's a biography of Anquetil, and the sex bit is apparently how he seduced a few friends' wives and lived in a 'menage a trois' at home. I'm wondering what he used the handlebar tape for!
  • Iforgrt who it's by but Tour de Force which is some guyfollowing Armstring for the 2004 season. Really well written and detailed accounts of a few of the big riders of the time, Landis, Hamilton, Ulrich and Mayo as well as Armstrong
  • If I remember correctly "Tour de Force" is by Dan Coyle not Matt Rendell.Coyle is American so he tends to look at Lance from a favourable viewpoint,nothing wrong with that mind before anyone starts picking a fight."Bad Blood" by Jeremy Whittle is quite good but a bit down on pro cycling and might leave you with a bitter taste about some of our biggest names-including Lance amongst others.The Robert Millar book is brilliant in my opinion -got Michael Hutchinson "Hour" book to start and also Pantani book by Matt Rendell when thats finished.
  • Hey there,

    I'm currently reading "The official Tour de France". It's a year by year account of the race from the very first Tour in 1903 up to 2004. It's really fascinating to see how the Tour began and how it took the world by storm overnight. The old-time photographs are absolutely brilliant too. It's a must for any Tour de France fan who is also interested in the history of the Tour.

    Graeme Obree's Flying Scotsman is also an excellent read. It's a painfully truthfull account of an exceptionally talented man whose battle with himself threatened many times to stop him reaching the top.

    Cheers
    Pedro
    Giant TCR Advanced II - Reviewed on my homepage
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