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Disc brakes on roadbikes...

ToshmundToshmund Posts: 390
edited September 2008 in The bottom bracket
Never seen the bike before until just. Do any other manufacturers use disc brakes on their roadbikes? Pretty easy to handle on a MTB, would have thought it could be quite hard to stop flatspots on a 700 x 23c! It comes with 35's, although hopefully it also comes with ABS? :?

http://www.leisurelakesbikes.com/produc ... x?&id=8992

Posts

  • synchronicitysynchronicity Posts: 1,415
    I think it all depends on the riding conditions. Flatlanders don't need disc brakes. Those living in steep mountainous territories would most likely relish the idea.

    There are some roads that I just won't descend on a road bike... So personally, yeah I would LOVE to get my hands on a one of those Cannondale cyclocross bikes:
    I'd probably go with a 140 rear and 180mm front disc rotor. :twisted:
    (but I'd really like to see a hydraulic option)

    8Cyclocross7c_red.jpg

    Conquest-Disc-R.jpg
  • Jeff JonesJeff Jones Posts: 1,865 Editor
    The general problem with having disc brakes on road bikes is that you don't get enough traction from the narrow tyres to justify all that stopping power.
    Jeff Jones

    Product manager, Sports
  • boybikerboybiker Posts: 531
    Just how useful would disc brakes be on 700x23c tyres?
    As it is I can lock both wheels in the dry and its even scarier in the wet.
    The gear changing, helmet wearing fule.
    FCN :- -1
    Given up waiting for Fast as Fupp to start stalking me
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Having a disc-equipped 'cross bike for a number of years there are advantages - you can leave the braking very, very late or even around the corner - the braking has less effect on the way the bike handles than a rim brake. Avid cable-discs are more than adequate - hydraulics just adds uneccessary weight and complication IMO. I took the bike out shod with road tyres on a number of winter club rides and even the hardest sceptics were won over when invited to a late-braking contest - they'd chicken-out well before me! The main disadvantage is that you have to use MTB hubs which are generally pretty heavy. A great advantage on a winter bike is that you don't get manky, worn-out rims. The braking is very progressive and so whilst you can lock the wheels, it's also to get the right amount of feel.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Ken NightKen Night Posts: 2,005
    There does seem to be a trend in this direction, though it must be said, for competent all round road bikes than for pure race type bikes

    More than a few manufacturers have come out with one, Trek, Orbea, Kona, Genesis, Planet X and others

    Kinesis are making road specific disc forks.

    Shimano and Avid have road specific discs and I understand the next generation will be lighter, and more efficient (even the benchmark Avid BB7s are not easy to set up)

    The new Shimano R505s look light

    In a bike shop near Annecy the other day, I saw a tandem, set up with STIs and hydraulic discs

    While Jeff is right, that you're limited largely by the amount of rubber you have on the road, you benefit from increase power, modulation, and wet braking

    The subject has been discussed before-I make no apology for directing you to this thread
    http://www.bikeradar.com/road/forums/vi ... highlight=

    and this
    http://www.bikeradar.com/road/forums/vi ... highlight=

    check out my bike-my favourite ride got better because of discs
    “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best..." Ernest Hemingway
  • synchronicitysynchronicity Posts: 1,415
    How did they set up hydraulic discs when using STI? :?
  • ToshmundToshmund Posts: 390
    Lagavulin wrote:
    Orbea have the Dieme.

    They do make a stunning looking bike Orbea. In general though it does seem to give the bike cleaner lines. I had not thought about the increase in stress on the front forks. Must be a fine one to balance the forks out, with the stresses encountered.

    I am sure I heard in a commentary in a TDF descent once, that a bit of the reticence in using the brakes was not wanting to lose speed. Also that in prolonged braking, the rims would increase in temperature and increase the likelihood of blow-outs. Avoid the brake fade, with discs as well.

    After being used to centre pulls on my MTB, the first time with Discs - thought I was going to have some gravel rash. Must be quite scary on a roadbike initially then! Just like getting into your car one day and deciding that you will left foot brake, from then on...

    Monty Dog, no sign of any mention on the Van Nicholas page - a lovely fixed gear though. I think the bloke in the LBS has me lined up for a sale, in the near future. Possibly the way my eyes glaze over.

    Thanks for your feedback, interesting stuff.
  • Ken NightKen Night Posts: 2,005
    Toshmund

    The Everti bike Andyp referred to in the original thread has been rebuilt with SRAM, and still a great looking bike
    http://www.evertibikes.com/odyssey.htm

    I noticed some time ago Focus were doing a disc braked crosser too-at a great price

    I'm using Kinesis forks on mine-the feel is just right, forgiving, without being juddery under braking.
    Bontrager told me earlier in the year, they are not going to import the forks you see on the Everti or on the Trek Portland. They were quite sniffy about it

    FWIW, I also saw two disc braked bikes in this years Etape, so while perhaps no more than a fad at the moment, it is proven discs on a road bike do work....and there are also a few flat barred city bikes with them




    Synchronicity, which Cannondale.?...one of your links is missing a pic

    The STIs were converted to hydraulics with a piston device, located quite near the hoods. More weight, and ugly, but according to the shopowner who'd built it, worked as well as MtB discs
    “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best..." Ernest Hemingway
  • No need for them - thats why.

    Its easy to lock up both wheels of a road bike with road brakes.

    Disc brakes would add a load of weight - to the frame and fork in the form of extra bracing,
    to the brifters and the added weight of the caliper and rotor.

    They make sense on a cross bike where they are going to be used in minging conditions and on a commuter where weight isnt an issue, but on a road bike they are a daft idea.

    Not to mention, maintaining disc brakes is a pain in the censored compared to maintaining a set of road brakes.
  • Ken NightKen Night Posts: 2,005
    Parsnip49 wrote:
    No need for them - thats why.

    Its easy to lock up both wheels of a road bike with road brakes.

    Disc brakes would add a load of weight - to the frame and fork in the form of extra bracing,
    to the brifters and the added weight of the caliper and rotor.

    They make sense on a cross bike where they are going to be used in minging conditions and on a commuter where weight isnt an issue, but on a road bike they are a daft idea.

    Not to mention, maintaining disc brakes is a pain in the ars* compared to maintaining a set of road brakes.

    Most of this has already been said
    Ken Night wrote:
    There does seem to be a trend in this direction, though it must be said, for competent all round road bikes than for pure race type bikes

    Have a look at the Everti bike, and imagine where it might be used

    the road disc brake is very much early days-MtB discs adapted, but getting better and easier to maintain
    “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best..." Ernest Hemingway
  • ILL NEVER PUT THOSE UGLY THINGS ON MY BIKE(S)!!

    NEVER! do you hear me NEVER!
    'dont forget lads, one evertonian is worth twenty kopites'
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    ILL NEVER PUT THOSE UGLY THINGS ON MY BIKE(S)!!

    NEVER! do you hear me NEVER!

    Now, you haven't thought that through!

    Imagine how cool your bike would look with disc brakes, fog lamps, a spoiler and a Burberry saddle cover. Hold that image in your mind and think again! 8)


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • hmmmmmmmmmmmm............................a spoiler?

    sounds good! :D
    'dont forget lads, one evertonian is worth twenty kopites'
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