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front Wheel Hitting my toe..............

subypsubyp Posts: 16
edited August 2008 in Road beginners
Hello fellow cyclists, I have just bought a trek 1.7 after a long time out of the saddle(10 years), but i have a problem. My bike has been set up for me by a cycle shop(Evans) but my toes when clipped into my peddals are catching the front wheel whilst steering. This makes going up hill and steering impossible. I have nearly had a spill already. Is there any thing I can do,or is the bike the wrong frame size!

Any help will be greatly appreciated................

Posts

  • synchronicitysynchronicity Posts: 1,415
    This happens with all small sized road bikes (52cm & smaller). Generally you tend not to steer that much at speed for it to be a big problem.

    This is just one reason why 650c wheels are better suited to small bikes - no toe overlap! :wink:
  • feelfeel Posts: 800
    can you adjust the cleat position on your shoes? The spd cleats on my shimano shoes were.
    We are born with the dead:
    See, they return, and bring us with them.
  • nickwillnickwill Posts: 2,735
    It really isn't an issue in most cases. To set up a small road bike without it can lead to compromises elsewhere in handling. My bike has overlap, and over 5 years I've never had a problem. Foot size might make things worse. Mine are 43s.
  • gavintcgavintc Posts: 3,009
    This is completely normal - called toe overlap and is common on race bikes. As already stated, it is not usually an issue. Just be aware of it and avoid turning the front when your feet are forward.
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    The last bike I had that did not have toe overlap was an old sit up and beg my dad bought for me in 1966.
  • redddraggonredddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Are you using clipless pedals?

    I use clipless pedals and my feet touch the pedals at the ball of the foot. My nephew uses flat pedals and a similar size frame, but he's nearly pedalling with his heel. Can you guess who has horrendous toe overlap?

    What is the position of your feet on the pedals?
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  • synchronicitysynchronicity Posts: 1,415
    This is one reason I prefer 650c wheels, even though I have a 57cm bike. :wink:
    It enables me to make sharp turns & zig-zag up super-steep narrow streets if need be.
  • k-dogk-dog Posts: 1,652
    My 58cm has a little bit of toe overlap but it's not really a problem unless you're doing really slow turns - and then you just have to stop pedalling as the pedal passes the wheel.

    It's just a factor of racier geometry.
    I'm left handed, if that matters.
  • AmbermileAmbermile Posts: 117
    k-dog wrote:
    ...and then you just have to stop pedalling as the pedal passes the wheel...

    headscratch.gif

    Arthur
    The Beastie


    Sic itur ad astra
  • k-dogk-dog Posts: 1,652
    It's not that complicated - if you are turn right the back of the wheel will be going to the left so when you get to the point where your left pedal is pointing forward you just have to hesitate as the wheel goes past - you'll knock your foot a few times but after a while it becomes easy.
    I'm left handed, if that matters.
  • AmbermileAmbermile Posts: 117
    Right - so you mean as the wheel passes the pedal then. If you stop pedalling as the pedal passes the wheel it will never pass the wheel, no?


    Arthur
    The Beastie


    Sic itur ad astra
  • It's not a lot different to leaning over when cornering - you just stop pedalling for a very short while.

    Cornering - you keep the inside pedal out of the way of the road

    Overlap - you keep the pedal out of the way of the wheel.



    Why is overlap a problem when going uphill ? Or are you zigzagging all over the road ? Instead of turning the bars, try leaning the bike left & right when climbing.
  • This tow-clip overlap is to be found on most modern road bicycles. I have 2 bikes and both have this, but i have learned how to avoid (my 'Right' toe especially) making contact with front wheel. Just be mindful when taking-off from stationary position, especially in traffic. After a very short time you will also find you will get to know how to avoid your foot making contact (with front wheel). Good luck & keep-on cycling.
  • gavintcgavintc Posts: 3,009
    Ambermile wrote:
    Right - so you mean as the wheel passes the pedal then. If you stop pedalling as the pedal passes the wheel it will never pass the wheel, no?


    Arthur

    You are making too much of this. If you are actually cycling, you will hardly move your front wheel as most turning is achieved by leaning. If you are moving very slowly, and are moving the steering, you can plan where your feet are. But really, it is NOT a problem.
  • subypsubyp Posts: 16
    Thank you very much to everyone who shed some light on this issue. I will take on board the advise given to me and take things easy until I adjust to the new frame set up.
    Thanks again............Graham
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