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SPD & Foot Trouble

BobbyTriggerBobbyTrigger Posts: 377
edited August 2008 in Health, fitness & training
recently purchased my first set of SPD's for my GT

after a months use i've noticed some pain in my right foot and ankle - which i guess is due to my foot not being able to move around as it normally would on a flat pedal.

is this normal? should i bin the SPD's? would moving the cleat on the shoe help? might my foot get used to it and the pain go away over time?

i have no history of aches or pains in my right foot/ankle either.

greatful for any advice/help.

Cheers.

Posts

  • lost-timelost-time Posts: 549
    Are you getting 'hot spots' on the sole of your foot? It could be a case of adjusting your cleat especially if your left foot is ok. I find that if I wriggle my toes every so often that can help stop any discomfort.
  • BobbyTriggerBobbyTrigger Posts: 377
    not on the base of the foot no, right side of my foot and around the outside of my ankle :(

    i'll be most upset if i need to ditch the SPD's!
  • lost-timelost-time Posts: 549
    I would still play around with the position of the cleats...It may be that your foot is turning in just ever so slightly too much. Adjust it and ride again. I find on my commuting bike that I'd get pain in my left foot whilst on my main bike I don't get any pain and yet I use the same shoes. I put it down to the fact that on the commute I usually push myself quite hard and it is a constant pedal where as out on the trail there are more stop/starts places to freewheel etc.

    You could always try a support bandage too to see if that helps. Dunno other than what I've said already.
  • BobbyTriggerBobbyTrigger Posts: 377
    cheers - i'll try moving the cleat
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    and keep notes about movements and positions...
  • andrewjosephandrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    Check the alignment of your feet and adjust the cleats to suit. Sit on a high bench so as to let your legs dangle straight down without resting on or against anything.

    relax your feet and take note of the angle each foot rests at. this is the angle you need to replicate on your pedals. Most people have asymmetric feet so the cleat angle on your left may be fine but not the right. both my feet need the cleats to be set at an angle on the shoe to allow a heels in fit, the angle is different on each foot. The same goes for my wife, son and daughter (and quite probably everyone else who rides).

    Ankle pain may also be from the unaccustomed lifting you are now doing when riding. Try not to pull up so hard with the right foot.
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
  • BobbyTriggerBobbyTrigger Posts: 377
    cheers! i'll try that tonight - to be honest as its my first set i just clagged the cleats on in the centre of the shoe.
  • lost-timelost-time Posts: 549
    Check the alignment of your feet and adjust the cleats to suit. Sit on a high bench so as to let your legs dangle straight down without resting on or against anything.

    relax your feet and take note of the angle each foot rests at. this is the angle you need to replicate on your pedals. Most people have asymmetric feet so the cleat angle on your left may be fine but not the right. both my feet need the cleats to be set at an angle on the shoe to allow a heels in fit, the angle is different on each foot. The same goes for my wife, son and daughter (and quite probably everyone else who rides).

    Ankle pain may also be from the unaccustomed lifting you are now doing when riding. Try not to pull up so hard with the right foot.

    Bit more scientific than my 'play around with the position of the cleats'! 8)
  • andrewjosephandrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    lost-time wrote:
    Check the alignment of your feet and adjust the cleats to suit. Sit on a high bench so as to let your legs dangle straight down without resting on or against anything.

    relax your feet and take note of the angle each foot rests at. this is the angle you need to replicate on your pedals. Most people have asymmetric feet so the cleat angle on your left may be fine but not the right. both my feet need the cleats to be set at an angle on the shoe to allow a heels in fit, the angle is different on each foot. The same goes for my wife, son and daughter (and quite probably everyone else who rides).

    Ankle pain may also be from the unaccustomed lifting you are now doing when riding. Try not to pull up so hard with the right foot.

    Bit more scientific than my 'play around with the position of the cleats'! 8)

    means the same, just playing around with a purpose! :wink:
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
  • ironyirony Posts: 43
    When unclipping from the spds make sure your foot is tensed rather than flopping the ankle out. Kind of push the heel down and out and pronate to disengage.

    I've found if I flop out it stresses the ankles ligaments which produces pain after a while.

    I also adjusted my cleats to allow maximum outward rotation before disengaging as I figured this would allow the most 'float' for me.
    2750921120_2950536dcb_s.jpg
  • BobbyTriggerBobbyTrigger Posts: 377
    cheers irony
  • Dr_DeathDr_Death Posts: 1,262
    Sounds like your foot is toeing in too much if you are getting pain in the outer aspect. I can only offer the same advice as above, play about with cleat angle until everything is comfy...

    Andrew joseph has the right idea but the best way is to put a mirror on the floor under the edge of the table you are sitting on. that way you can see the bottom of your shoes and adjust the cleats so they face the right way....
    Steve

    Trust me, I'm a doctor!

    http://www.vimeo.com/DrDeath
  • shefbikershefbiker Posts: 255
    I'd be interested to hear any advice (lost-time??) on the hotspots meantioned earlier in the thread?

    I'm finding that the outside of my foot sole is getting 'hot' when I'm commuting, and would be interested in any suggestions... i've been using SPDs for ages and i've done the "sit on a side board and let your feet dangle" so i'm fairly happy with the angle...

    Does this have something to do with why the forward/back cleat position is different on road shoes?

    Thanks in advance.
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