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Arm and hand ache on new bike

tobciocctobciocc Posts: 276
edited August 2008 in MTB beginners
Hi

I'm a recent convert to mountain biking having spent 10 years as a roadie, just bought a Specialized Rockhopper. Basically my arms are really painful after about 2 hours, do I need a flat bar or bar ends, the bars on the bike rise up a fair bit.
Gabba Gabba Hey

Posts

  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    can you hold your upper body in place without using your arms, if you get what i mean. If not then you are over-reaching. Also which parts of your hands are you using on the grips? Could be you need fatter grips to fit your hands better or something like ergon grips/barends which people swear by
  • BikerbaboonBikerbaboon Posts: 1,017
    are you using riser bars (ones that bend up towards you ) if you are then set them to come up along the same line as your arms.
    i did this and it cleared up my hand ache that i would get after a ride.
    Nothing in life can not be improved with either monkeys, pirates or ninjas
    456
  • tobciocctobciocc Posts: 276
    Yes they do rise up and it does feel a little odd I have to say, they are the standard specialized bars. I can't quite work out how I can move them in the way you describe as the raised profile won't change ... hmmm I'll have to check that
    Gabba Gabba Hey
  • grantwaygrantway Posts: 1,430
    I agree with Ride whenever try a pair of OD 's
  • realnumber 1realnumber 1 Posts: 675
    Are you using a decent pair of gloves?
  • shin0rshin0r Posts: 555
    Could be compression of the ulnar nerve; I had this. The solution was to install thick grips (race face good/evil) and wear padded gloves (the Body Geometry ones are very good).

    Also I changed the angle of my brake and gear levers to about 45 degrees with the intention of having a straight arm when braking; this seemed to help.

    http://orthoinfo.org/topic.cfm?topic=A0 ... urn_link=0
  • tobciocctobciocc Posts: 276
    Well I was thinking about trying a flat bar to change the angle and see how that felt, on another forum people seemed to think this was a bit naff. I don't really understand that as it means your hands surely rest on the bars in a more natural way, what does anybody else think?
    Gabba Gabba Hey
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    if you have a straight bar then your wrist will be bent unless you have your hands exactly shoulder width apart, with risers you can get more backsweep which produces a more natural line through the wrist.
  • andrewjosephandrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    tobciocc wrote:
    Yes they do rise up and it does feel a little odd I have to say, they are the standard specialized bars. I can't quite work out how I can move them in the way you describe as the raised profile won't change ... hmmm I'll have to check that

    Loosen the bolts on the stem cap, rotate the bars forwards or backwards slightly, ride bike. this can pull in the bars nearer to you or push then further away. Find the best position, if this is still a problem, try a shorter stem.

    A new stem is cheaper and easier to fit than new bars and may be all you need.

    Also try different grips, thicker/softer/thinner. this is a really cheap 'upgrade' that can work wonders, as can good gloves.

    As has been said, try to get the brake levers in line with your forearms 'when in the braking position' i.e. when braking hard standing on the pedals with your bum behind the saddle. That's when you need your brakes to be most effective.
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
  • You'll just get used to it really, if you've just come over from the dark side then your arms won't be used to the constant hammering of rocks and roots
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