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Dual carriageways(Rainford Bypass)

Super SaintSuper Saint Posts: 22
edited July 2008 in The bottom bracket
If there is a cycle path at the side of a dual carriageway, do you have to use it.

I have just bought my first road bike, and have previously used a montain bike up and down the Rainford Bypass using the cycle path. The path is not bad in places, but at times it proved to be very bumpy even on my mountain bike, not to mention quite a lot of glass/debris in places as well.

It is used quite a lot by chain gangs and TT's, and as you would expect, these riders use the road.

I have also seen quite a few lone riders sticking to the road.

I only use the route in the evening around 8.00pm when it is pretty quiet, and have been using the road, as I really don't think the path is suitable for a road bike in places, and a lot of the time it proves difficult to feed back on to the road at the end of the cycle path.

Last night I was politely advised to "Get on the cycle path" by a fellow cyclist who was using the cycle path. I didn't feel I was doing anything wrong, as I thought it was down to personal preference if you used the path.

I wouldn't consider using the road at peak times but feel it it safe to do so in the evening.

Please advise.

Thanks

Dave

Posts

  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    If there is a cycle path at the side of a dual carriageway, do you have to use it.
    No - there is no compulsion in the Highway Code, although it does advise cyclists to use cycle lanes where possible
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    i thought in advised you to use them unless you were travelling over 18mph, in which case it advises that you use the road...
  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    61
    Cycle Routes and Other Facilities. Use cycle routes, advanced stop lines, cycle boxes and toucan crossings unless at the time it is unsafe to do so. Use of these facilities is not compulsory and will depend on your experience and skills, but they can make your journey safer.

    62
    Cycle Tracks. These are normally located away from the road, but may occasionally be found alongside footpaths or pavements. Cyclists and pedestrians may be segregated or they may share the same space (unsegregated). When using segregated tracks you MUST keep to the side intended for cyclists as the pedestrian side remains a pavement or footpath. Take care when passing pedestrians, especially children, older or disabled people, and allow them plenty of room. Always be prepared to slow down and stop if necessary. Take care near road junctions as you may have difficulty seeing other road users, who might not notice you.


    [Law HA 1835 sect 72]

    63
    Cycle Lanes. These are marked by a white line (which may be broken) along the carriageway (see Rule 140). Keep within the lane when practicable. When leaving a cycle lane check before pulling out that it is safe to do so and signal your intention clearly to other road users. Use of cycle lanes is not compulsory and will depend on your experience and skills, but they can make your journey safer.
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TravelAndTr ... /DG_069837
  • vermootenvermooten Posts: 2,697
    I did some TTs on Rainsford by-pass earlier in the year and we all used the road.
    You just have to ride like you never have to breathe again.

    Manchester Wheelers
  • nwallacenwallace Posts: 1,465
    i thought in advised you to use them unless you were travelling over 18mph, in which case it advises that you use the road...

    That sounds more like the DfT design guidelines for cycle facilities, which was discussed ages ago.
    Do Nellyphants count?

    Commuter: FCN 9
    Cheapo Roadie: FCN 5
    Off Road: FCN 11

    +1 when I don't get round to shaving for x days
  • Red RockRed Rock Posts: 517
    I generally stay on the road when I'm on the Rainford bypass and any other road with a cycle path running along side of it. On roads with cycle lanes painted on them I ride further out in the road to avoid all the censored that builds up in them.

    Red Rock
  • geoff_ssgeoff_ss Posts: 1,234
    I don't know about the Rainford By-pass but our Wednesday rides occasionally end up on the A38 near Burton-on-Trent in the middle of the day. We're only on it for a couple of miles and always use the separate cycle track because the road is teeming with lorries and very fast traffic. I'm no fan of cycle tracks and usually avoid them but the A38 is a motorway in all but name and best avoided.

    A local trikie insists on using the main carriageway and has been knocked off a few times fortunately without fatal results and a friend of mine was killed on it one night when it was almost empty - I think before the cycle track was built.

    So I guess you make the choice depending on the circumstances but there is no legal requirement to use them. The trouble with cycle tracks is that they're built by motorists and designed to get bikes out of the way of their cars rather than to assist cyclists. As such it's standard practice to force cyclists to give way at every side road, factory exit, pub car park etc etc and really makes them totally unsuitable for serious journeys of any length.

    Geoff
    Old cyclists never die; they just fit smaller chainrings ... and pedal faster
  • kempy1959kempy1959 Posts: 3
    When I have travelled along the Rainford by pass I always use the road. Whilst I think it is generally agreed that the safest place to be is on the cycle path, you would soon get fed up of giving way at every side road etc.
  • I know the A38 and Rainford By-pass.
    The A38 as Geoff_SS said is all but a motorway and i woundn't ride on it and if i had a choice i'd stick to the cycle path.
    The Rainford by-pass is alot less busy and therefore feels safer (but then again it only takes one car/lorrie/bike etc..).
    So if the cycle path is a mess and or dangerous i'd risk the road with not to much thought
    at the Rainford by-pass but not on the A38.
    It all depends on the road just keep your eyes and ears open.
  • david 142david 142 Posts: 227
    I used to live in Rainford. That cycle path must be one of the oldest in the country and stretches of it were appallingly rough 20years ago. I find it difficult to imagine that it has been reconstructed since. If I was up that way I'd be planning to ride in the road. Mind you, the cycle track would be a good place to mend a flat :lol:
  • Red RockRed Rock Posts: 517
    david 142 wrote:
    I used to live in Rainford. That cycle path must be one of the oldest in the country and stretches of it were appallingly rough 20years ago. I find it difficult to imagine that it has been reconstructed since. If I was up that way I'd be planning to ride in the road. Mind you, the cycle track would be a good place to mend a flat :lol:

    I can vouch for that :(
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