Which is the most comfortable saddle?

flyer
flyer Posts: 608
edited July 2008 in Road beginners
Having used a Toupe Gel for a few weeks, by bum is very "unfomfortable" after about 2 hours.

Is it normal to expect this, after about 30 - 40 miles or so, or is there a better saddle?

What saddle do you use?

I guess its just a case of which is the least uncomfortable?

Flyer

Comments

  • Doobz
    Doobz Posts: 2,800
    Not sure how long you have been riding the saddle but it can take a week or two for your bum to adjust.

    I used to use a Fizik Pave HP but changed it to a San-Marco concour as I do a lot of climbing and the flatter saddles made me feel like I was going to slip off the back
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  • I understand that theres a breaking in timme with all saddles, and that the performance saddles, ie the ones that are generally narrow and light, will become more comfortable in the long run than wider heavier types, believe it or not.
    I actually fit the Standard Toupe in 143mm on my S Works and after two weeks I feel that my arse is adjusting-I presume you worked out which width saddle you fit best?
    Spesh Works Roubaix '10
    28 Charolais and counting.
  • doyler78
    doyler78 Posts: 1,951
    Also make sure you have it set dead flat, get a level to check it, as I had my only slightly sloping down (thought by looking at it that it was flat) and that gave me no end of arse and ball ache however as soon as I set it flat I haven't had a problem though my longest ride on it has only been 2 1/2 hours as it is only been using it a week. Absolutely love it now.
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    I swear by Fizik Ariones (got a black one and a white one), I used to like Selle Italia Flites but they seem to give me a really numb bum these days.
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  • N0bodyOfTheGoat
    N0bodyOfTheGoat Posts: 5,842
    The non-gel version of the Toupe is great, almost certainly the most comfortable saddle I've ever had on any bike, despite what people at work say when they look at its shape" :D
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  • andrewjoseph
    andrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    I've got Brooks B17 narrow on both my road and mtb. best saddles I've ever used.
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
  • geoff_ss
    geoff_ss Posts: 1,201
    I've got Brooks B17 narrow on both my road and mtb. best saddles I've ever used.

    The best saddle is the one you find most comfortable. No-one can select it for you. I have a friend who's been cycling for over 50 years of 1000's of miles/year and still has saddle problems. Her husband swears that the stoker saddle on their tandem changes itself when he whistles :)

    Me? I'm firmly in the Brookes camp too.

    geoff
    Old cyclists never die; they just fit smaller chainrings ... and pedal faster
  • Having spent a considerable sum on saddles over the years, I arrived at the conclusion that if you spend enough time riding on them, most saddles become less uncomfortable eventually. Then I came across the Charge Spoon, (brilliant) For me, it was immediately comfortable over a 60 mile ride and also dead cheap at £20 or so. (Dont bother with the more expensive titanium railed version as the standard saddle is light enough already)
  • bendertherobot
    bendertherobot Posts: 11,684
    I did a the 21 mile part of a Triathlon on the weekend on my charge spoon.

    With only running shorts on.

    Superb seat.
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  • scapaslow
    scapaslow Posts: 305
    I arrived at the conclusion that if you spend enough time riding on them, most saddles become less uncomfortable eventually

    I have to disagree. My experience is the opposite- an uncomfortable saddle just gets worse. I've been through a few including the much vaunted toupe which doesn't suit me and is heading for the exit.

    My current saddle is a Topeak Allay racing saddle on which i can now do over 4 hours reasonably comfortably. Previously anything over 2 hours became torture.

    I do think though that the padding on the shorts/bibs can make a big difference and that the ultimate comfort will come when you find a saddle/shorts combo that really suits you. For example, my bib longs seem more comfortable with the above saddle than my well padded bibshorts.

    It probably is too much to expect that after 4/5 hours on any saddle not to feel any discomfort?
  • andrewjoseph
    andrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    The first saddle I used (first mtb) had kevlar thigh glides, i had blisters on the inside of my thighs and 'inner cheeks'. no more kevlar for me! I tried and loved the fizik gobi, but i kept breaking them after 8-9 months and they are £80 a time. (yes i know they are guaranteed but the replacement breaks after 9 months)

    The brooks B17 costs ~£40 and has a two year guarantee. it will eventually mould itself to you butt and then get better.

    However, the B17 ladies did not suit my wife at all, I took it of her bike after 6 months persevering, back to her spesh dolce and smiles all round.

    Some companies used to do a try before you buy scheme, you ordered a pack of six saddles for a ?£25 deposit, tried each for several days. if you didn't like any or did not buy from the company, then they kept the depos. if you liked and bought one of the saddles then the £25 came off the cost of the saddle.

    Can't for the life of me remember who used to do this.
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  • gkerr4
    gkerr4 Posts: 3,408
    I like the Toupe on my best bike - i carried ot over from my last best bike and I really like it even after an extended period in the saddle.

    On my fixed bike (which gets used for shorter periods) I have one of the (oft mentioned) charge spoon's - in brown to match my brown langster (with the matching charge leather-look bar tape!)
    I have to say - it's a pretty comfy saddle - well worth the £20 asking price.

    As said - saddles are a bit of a personal thing and you might have t try a few - but if I were you I'd give the charge spoon a go - it's not a huge outlay and if you decide you don't like it you will get most of your money back through ebay.
  • deal
    deal Posts: 857

    Some companies used to do a try before you buy scheme, you ordered a pack of six saddles for a ?£25 deposit, tried each for several days. if you didn't like any or did not buy from the company, then they kept the depos. if you liked and bought one of the saddles then the £25 came off the cost of the saddle.

    Can't for the life of me remember who used to do this.

    this sounds great, anyone else heard about anyone doing this? it would be perfect for me!

    im currently trying to find one, tried sitting on some in shops but that is no way to try a saddle,my current tactic is to buy nearly new saddles from ebay so i can test them properly, if they dont suit i just sell them on at roughly the same price and try another, beats buying a £90 saddle and selling it on for £30 a few weeks later
  • fluff.
    fluff. Posts: 771
    I know Bontrager do an unconditional 90 day return for refund or exchange on their saddles, if it's any help in that regard ^
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,467
    I'm also a big toupe fan, although I know they're not for everyone.

    One thing that has always confused me when people talk about having saddles dead flat - what is flat?

    Saddles like the toupe are designed to support the sitbones while at the same time not putting pressure on the perineal area, so the profile of the top of the saddle itself is not flat, it slopes up slightly towards the back. Now, if you put a spirit level along a line from the tip of the saddle to one of the highest points at the back (it would need to be angled slightly so as not to sit in the groove in the middle of the back) and get it level, then the front part of the saddle is actually going to be sloping up... Personally the angle that works best for me is to have the nose of the saddle flat and the rear sloping up slightly to support the sitbones, and this appears to be the position the saddle is designed for. The problem is replicating it precisely - you have to do it by eye I guess.
  • Rich-Ti
    Rich-Ti Posts: 1,831
    It's less that the front of the saddle points up and more that 'the bit where your bum goes' dips down - putting a spirit level across the saddle should put it flat or level, which is 'correct' for use on a road bike.

    The saddle on my mtb is a Spoon and is slightly 'nose up'.
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,467
    That doesn't work for me - I get perineal discomfort unless the back is just a tiny bit higher.
  • doyler78
    doyler78 Posts: 1,951
    For men there are considered to be two positions that work and that is either dead flat or slightly raised. For women it is the opposite, dead flat or slightly downward, or so I am lead to believe. Worked for me anyway.

    I find a small spirit level makes this easier for the reasons that have been pointed out ie the saddle is not level to start with. You need one just big enough to set on the saddle essentially towards the back of the cut out pointing forward. Well that's what worked for me anyway. That way you avoid the warp in the saddle at the back and the front.
  • andrewjoseph
    andrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    this sounds great, anyone else heard about anyone doing this? it would be perfect for me!

    Fizik used to have a money back guarantee too.

    Gearshift used to give the trial offer i mentioned, but the website is not working.
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails