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Manual Pumps vs Presta Valves

carl_pcarl_p Posts: 989
edited July 2008 in Road beginners
I have a track pump but I think I also need a manual pump to carry with me whilst out on my rides. I'm considering the Topeak one below or something similar.

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/Cycle/7/Topea ... 360012679/

However it concerns me that this pump appears to sit on top on top of the valve and is quite likely to put a lot of stress on it whilst you inflate the tyre. Presta valves look a bit thin and brittle to me and I can see me snapping it quite easily. Am I right to have this concern? Can anyone recommend a pump that attaches differently yet is equally effective and portable?

Thanks.
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Posts

  • Marko1962Marko1962 Posts: 320
    I'm in a similar position in wanting a small convenient pump but worry about damaging my valves. I haven't received it yet but I have ordered a Topeak mini Morph pump that attaches via a tube. I don't expect it to get me up to 110psi without a lot of effort (I have a track pump for that) but I do expect it to get me up to a reasonable psi to get me riding again in the event of a puncture...

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/Cycle/7/Topeak_Mini_Morph_Pump/5360022931
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    I have given up on those types of pumps and switched to a Topeak Road Morph. A bit
    heavier than the others but works great out on the road. Take a look at one and you'll see why. And yes, those other ones can and do bend valves when you use them.

    Dennis Noward
  • Rich HcpRich Hcp Posts: 1,355
    My on bike pump (Specialized mini) has only been used twice while changing tubes after a flat.

    Use a track pump to maintain presure.
    Richard

    Giving it Large
  • PhilofCasPhilofCas Posts: 1,153
    i think you'd have to be a bit heavyhanded to break a presta valve using a standard pump. I'd check if the threaded collar that holds the valve to the rim is nipped up nice and secure.
  • NuggsNuggs Posts: 1,804
    How about a CO2 pump and plenty of cartridges? No danger of valve damage there...
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    I can second the road morph, probably the most ergonomic pump of its type, the tube and mini-track pump style of use means that adequate pressures of 110psi+ can be easilly achieved. Whilst I take the point that one needs to be heavy handed to cause valve damage with other types of pump, I am one of those heavy handed types and have broken valves on more than one occasion. As you tire and strain to get the pressure up that is when such heavy-handidness is likely to occur. Get the Road Morph and you will know for sure that you will inflate your tyre without problems.

    My next favourite pump is the Cycleaire Plus.

    CO2 is fine, but on long rides or multi-day tours it is not sufficiently reassuring to me.
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    I use the moutain morph, as I also ride MTB, and it'll pump up to 100-110psi really quickly, fantastic pumping solution.
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    Mountain Morph and Road Morph are both excellent, the differences seem to be the Road Morph is slightly longer (2.5cm?) and thinner, has a pressure gauge, and costs about £4 more. Prices range between about £19 and £29 for these pumps depending on which model and of course, where you buy one - you will not be disappointed by either IMHO. Both claim 160psi and I reckon that is achievable (though you are unlikely to need that much). www.activesport.co.uk seem to have them at good prices.
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,448
    Whilst I take the point that one needs to be heavy handed to cause valve damage with other types of pump,
    I broke one once, although it was when I was trying to bend the thin bit of the valve back again after I had bent it with the pump. If it gets bent more than 2 or three times metal fatigue is likely to make it break. Sometimes I've wondered if different brands of tubes use different types of metal in the valve and if some are less likely to bend and/or break than others.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    When I got my MTB 10 years ago I was surprised to find that the pump attached directly to the schraeder valve (I grew up with old fashioned frame pumps with the flexible tube in the handle, and presta valves)
    Always worried that I'd damage the valve (never did) but had a couple of tubes written off because of splits at the base of the valve. Always thought that was due to the violence inflicted when inflating using the hand pump.
    Now I'm about to buy my first road bike in 25 years, I'll definitely be getting one of the Topeak Morphs. Can't imagine trying to get a tyre to 100psi while hanging on to the valve.
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