Saddle position

goldenhitman1
goldenhitman1 Posts: 26
edited June 2008 in Road beginners
I am getting my new bike soon: Bianchi c2c via nirone 7 alu 105, now I want quite an aggresive ride with this but what confuses me is the saddle position. By looking at bikes it seems that hightening the saddle increases the aggresivnes of the position, is this true?

Comments

  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    By looking at bikes it seems that hightening the saddle increases the aggresivnes of the position, is this true?

    The saddle should be at the right height. You need to lower the handlebars and/or a longer stem to get a more aggressive position.

    Saddle height should be determined by physical characteristics (e.g. leg length) rather than any desire to change position.
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  • feel
    feel Posts: 800
    If you want a more aggressive riding position make sure your frame size isn't too big.
    I.E. torn between two frame sizes - go for the smaller one.
    We are born with the dead:
    See, they return, and bring us with them.
  • For a really aggressive riding position, mount a spear along the top tube, and don't forget to scowl :)

    What is an `aggressive' position, anyway?
  • For a really aggressive riding position, mount a spear along the top tube, and don't forget to scowl :)

    What is an `aggressive' position, anyway?

    I don't know how to put it but you know what i mean. I am 177cm and have been told a 59cm (bianchi)frame is the right size for me, but, it seems alot of taller people are riding alot smaller frames e.g. 51cm!
  • Also apparently I would be a 56 frame normally but in Bianchi I would need a 59
  • GeorgeShaw
    GeorgeShaw Posts: 764
    For a really aggressive riding position, mount a spear along the top tube, and don't forget to scowl :)

    What is an `aggressive' position, anyway?

    I don't know how to put it but you know what i mean. I am 177cm and have been told a 59cm (bianchi)frame is the right size for me, but, it seems alot of taller people are riding alot smaller frames e.g. 51cm!

    59cm sounds far too large. I'm 1.75m and ride a 52cm frame.
  • GeorgeShaw wrote:
    For a really aggressive riding position, mount a spear along the top tube, and don't forget to scowl :)

    What is an `aggressive' position, anyway?

    I don't know how to put it but you know what i mean. I am 177cm and have been told a 59cm (bianchi)frame is the right size for me, but, it seems alot of taller people are riding alot smaller frames e.g. 51cm!

    59cm sounds far too large. I'm 1.75m and ride a 52cm frame.

    On a Bianchi Bike?
  • Yes, I know what you mean.

    You can't necessarily compare frame sizes between manufacturers or even, in some cases, between model ranges from the same manufacturer. What's more, height (of the rider) is not necessarily a good indication of bike sizing, because people's bodies aren't all the same size. For example, many people shorter than me have longer legs, because my spine is long for my height.

    As other's have pointed out, if you're going for the nose-over-the-front-wheel posture, you'd probably be better tweaking the handlebar stem than the seat post or saddle. Riding a bike with a badly-positioned saddle for any distance is a wretched experience.
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,467
    If there's a single good reason for getting a bike fit done, it's to get your saddle position right. IMHO It's really difficult to do it yourself and to get it right using the standard rules like front of the knee over pedal axle, angle of knee etc. I thought I had mine right until I had a bike fit, but it turned out my saddle was too high and too far back. Getting it right has made big differences to my comfort and speed. On the other hand, reach and drop between the handlebars and saddle I have fiddled around with a lot and I think are far more to do with what feels right. In the end I ignored my bikefit recommendations for handlebar height and set them a lot lower than they recommended.
  • What do you mean by lowering handle bars? Surley thats not possible unless you had spacers before?
  • on the road
    on the road Posts: 5,631
    That's true, there's a limit to how far you can lower the handle bars, once all the spacers are gone that's it.
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,467
    I had 3cm of spacers before.

    After the cycle fit I additionally flipped the stem. Now I have flipped it back again. I could still go lower by up to 3cm if I wanted to (might do at some point in the future as I develop more core strength).

    I think it's sensible to allow for 2 or 3 centimeters of spacers when getting a frame unless you are very sure you will never want to change the bar height. 3cm is within fork manufacturers' tolerances and I think it looks fine. It's only when you start adding more than that it starts to look silly. And if you want to go higher, you can just flip the stem.
  • Have been thinking, am probaly going to get a Planet X bike instead as they are a bit more race orientated.
  • campagchris
    campagchris Posts: 773
    Have a look at this link and use it as a guide only.

    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CC ... ATOR_INTRO
  • If you like the Bianchi then why not have a look at the 1885 veloce. It's more race orientated and would be better suited for what you're after. If you wait a few weeks they will start to discount the 08 models.
    I managed to get mine for £800 last year.
    By the way, i'm the same height as you and I have a 55cm.
    Fits like a glove.