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Touching the Void

SteveR_100MilersSteveR_100Milers Posts: 5,987
edited April 2008 in The bottom bracket
Flirting with the fun of the Lakes last few days...think sharp edge and Jacks Rake. Got hold of this and realised how wussy I really am. Watched this and the army up everest expedition back to back last night till the early hours. Am in awe of these folks who think nothing of clinging onto a wall with their finger tips and tips of crampons.

then again, this is kind of surreal: dan osman soloing Bear's Reach. :shock:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rdCfM03Zhs

Posts

  • jpembrokejpembroke Posts: 2,569
    I climbed for about 13 years. I've hurt myself loads more on a bike than I ever did on rock and ice. Despite the impression given by books like Touching the Void, climbing is quite a safe sport.

    Great speed climbing clip btw, thanks for that.
    I'm only concerned with looking concerned
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 22,060
    Are you talking about the Joe Simpson one?!

    Its an amazing story, isnt it. And one of the best books i ve ever read....
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • doobie919doobie919 Posts: 119
    Good god, that's some crazy stuff right there.

    Is that the asme guy who climbed up huge monuments with just his bare hands, no supports or ropes or anything?
    2007 Fuji Newest 3.0.
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  • Just watched the film of his book the beckoning silence about the (2nd) ill fated attempt of the Eiger, when Toni Curz died hanging on a rope half way up the mountain. Fascinating stuff, and truly amazing photography.

    As regards mountainerring is safer than cycling...some of the Everest stats are interesting, where the death rates exceed 100% ratio to succesful summits (i.e. more people have died trying than achieved it). I don't think that death rates of cyclists get anywhere near! though admittedly there is a big difference between the Hilary step and Napes needle......
  • AdamskiiAdamskii Posts: 267
    Dan Osman did some crazy stuff but taking that many risks caught him out eventually.
    It's all good.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    I was an avid climber throughout my teens - I started cycling to get to the crags rather than rely on lifts/public transport. However, extreme rock climbing takes its toll on joint joints and in the end I had to give up because of acute tendonitis and the reluctance to have cortisone injections. I doubt there's a sport which relies on such physical strength and mental toughness. On my return rides from the crags and quarries north of Glasgow it was quite common to pick-up a club ride returning from the Trossachs. Many climbers were the extreme and endurance sportmen of the day, we'd do lengthy cross-country runs and bike rides before the concept of extreme sports had been invented - we just did it for fun or something to do! The ride of the West Highland way was done in the early 80's by road bike! Strangely enough one of my current cycling buddies was an avid climber too at the same age - only 20 years later we realised we had a few mutual acquaintences from our climbing days - he was a climbing buddy of Joe Simpson as well.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • jpembrokejpembroke Posts: 2,569
    Monty Dog - I assume you were a Dumbarton Rock man. Have you seen this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOHwUUoOLYM

    What a route. Shudder.

    and I have tendonitis too: fingers, shoulders, wrists. I is indeed tough on the old joints.
    I'm only concerned with looking concerned
  • Clever PunClever Pun Posts: 6,778
    you lot might appreciate this on C4 thursday at nine.. probably more sensationlist rather than true climbing though

    http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/tv_and_radio/article3620261.ece

    I watching him nearly get up the canary wharf tower in the rain... impressive
    Purveyor of sonic doom

    Very Hairy Roadie - FCN 4
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  • If you liked Touching the Void, you should check out a book called "The White spider", about the N face of the Eiger. best climbing book ever and one of the best sports books ever. Only "The Rider", and "Feet in the Clouds" come close. Written in 1956, I think. You think Joe is hard. Some of these boys climbed in 6 shirts as they couldn't afford a coat.
    Dan
  • jpembrokejpembroke Posts: 2,569
    I thought The White Spider was a bit dull to be honest: all that teutonic philosophy and symbolism of 'The Rope'. I ploughed through it because it's supposedly a classic but it didn't do much for me. Paul Pritchard's Deep Play is probably the best climbing book I've ever read. Alternatively, if you want the cutting edge of climbing philosophy you could always try Kiss or Kill by Mark Twight. Now, that is intense.
    I'm only concerned with looking concerned
  • ricadusricadus Posts: 2,379
    Yes, I was reading a history of the attempts on the Eiger's north face recently. A hideous piece of rock.
  • Ken NightKen Night Posts: 2,005
    Monty Dog wrote:
    I was an avid climber throughout my teens - I started cycling to get to the crags rather than rely on lifts/public transport.

    Same here............and favourite activity was mixed climbing in the Scottish winter/Alps in summer-the latter started the love affair with France.............and riding in the Alps

    I can't look down a tall building now-though I did go and look down Pink Void at Baggy Point a couple of months ago....

    Favourite books

    Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage-Herman Bhul
    The White Spider
    Mountaineering in Scotland/Undiscovered Scotland-Bill Murray

    and unputdownable-Savage Arena, by Joe Tasker
    “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best..." Ernest Hemingway
  • I'm busily trawling through the Everest 96 "disaster" books of Krakauer, Boukreev and finally the IMAX one for a more balanced view. Have to say though that there are far more interesting hills to climb and people that climb them. The Eiger is a monster, I watched the Hinterstoisser traverse reconstruction and frankly anyone daft enough to even think its possible is impressively bonkers. Shame he didnt leave a fixed rope though.....
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOHwUUoOLYM

    Is this the hardest asecent in the world?

    What's the general view as to which hill or rock is the hardest to get up?
  • jpembrokejpembroke Posts: 2,569
    Hey, I posted that link earlier.

    In terms of trad climbing (i.e. difficulty + danger) then yes, that is about as hard as it gets. In terms of absolute difficulty (i.e. hardest moves) it doesn't get much harder than this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoYjuLWg ... re=related
    I'm only concerned with looking concerned
  • jpembrokejpembroke Posts: 2,569
    I'm only concerned with looking concerned
  • IeuanllanIeuanllan Posts: 152
    edited March 2008
    In terms of hills, K2 is the hardest of all.

    Almost as high as Everest, but with grade 4 ice climbing above 8000m.
    I'm too cowardly for grade 4 ice at normal levels in the UK, despite being a respectable-ish climber!

    Having said that, there's a hill called 'Gasherbrum 4' which is absolutely nails as well.

    You guys should check out 'Vertical Pleasure' by Mick Fowler. A great read that always makes me want to go climbing, plus Fowler is just pure class - excellent climber and holds down a normal job!
  • ricadusricadus Posts: 2,379
    If you ever want a cycling & bouldering combo trip:

    http://www.peteranne.it/
  • impressive, but that for me is not as white knuckle as a climb with huge exposure. Hacking up eiger might be technically easier, but its the thought of a 2k drop if you slip that impresses me.....
  • jpembrokejpembroke Posts: 2,569
    My annual training trip is to the Verdon. I've climbed there in the past and the exposure there got to me more than climbing in the alps. I think it was the 2000ft abseil from the top to access the routes that gets to you. Cycling around the rim is hard enough for me these days.
    I'm only concerned with looking concerned
  • el_presidenteel_presidente Posts: 1,963
    jpembroke wrote:
    I thought The White Spider was a bit dull to be honest: all that teutonic philosophy and symbolism of 'The Rope'. I ploughed through it because it's supposedly a classic but it didn't do much for me. Paul Pritchard's Deep Play is probably the best climbing book I've ever read. Alternatively, if you want the cutting edge of climbing philosophy you could always try Kiss or Kill by Mark Twight. Now, that is intense.

    Kiss or Kill is a brilliant book. Twight's "Extreme Alpinism" is also very good. On face value it's an instruction manual but really it's a Nietschean philosophical rant on how to banish every facet of weakness from your body and mind.
    <a>road</a>
  • Ken NightKen Night Posts: 2,005
    jpembroke wrote:
    My annual training trip is to the Verdon. I've climbed there in the past and the exposure there got to me more than climbing in the alps. I think it was the 2000ft abseil from the top to access the routes that gets to you. Cycling around the rim is hard enough for me these days.

    I visited in 1981 and loved it-the ab was known to send hardmen home before the ropes were out

    Is the tree still on Lunabong? (an awful climb up an offwidth drain IIRC)
    “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best..." Ernest Hemingway
  • jpembroke wrote:
    I thought The White Spider was a bit dull to be honest: all that teutonic philosophy and symbolism of 'The Rope'. I ploughed through it because it's supposedly a classic but it didn't do much for me. Paul Pritchard's Deep Play is probably the best climbing book I've ever read. Alternatively, if you want the cutting edge of climbing philosophy you could always try Kiss or Kill by Mark Twight. Now, that is intense.
    Which just goes to show that one man's dull teutonis philosophy is another's heroic tragedy.
    Dan
  • heavymentalheavymental Posts: 2,020
    Vertical Limit is a good film isn't it.


    :lol: :roll:
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