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Interesting article about testosterone testing

iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,774
edited March 2008 in Pro race
Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.

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  • LangerDanLangerDan Posts: 6,132
    I bet Maurice Suh is cutting-and-pasting that article into a PowerPoint appeal for Floyd as we speak.
    'This week I 'ave been mostly been climbing like Basso - Shirley Basso.'
  • DaveyLDaveyL Posts: 5,167
    Absolutely irrelevant.
    Le Blaireau (1)
  • timoid.timoid. Posts: 3,133
    DaveyL wrote:
    Absolutely irrelevant.

    Why? If Floyd is of the genotype that could give a false positive, it strengthens his case.
    It's a little like wrestling a gorilla. You don't quit when you're tired. You quit when the gorilla is tired.
  • DaveyLDaveyL Posts: 5,167
    No it doesn't. He was busted by the carbon isotope test; the T/E ratio is essentially irrelevant.
    Le Blaireau (1)
  • timoid.timoid. Posts: 3,133
    But the second test should not have been done if the first one is flawed. No?

    It like that Rock racing guy with A sample negative and B sample positive. Technically he didn't fail the test.

    Incidentally when is Floyd going to join Rock Racing?
    It's a little like wrestling a gorilla. You don't quit when you're tired. You quit when the gorilla is tired.
  • DaveyLDaveyL Posts: 5,167
    No. And the T/E and carbon isotope are different tests, not the same test of an A and B sampleso the Rock Racing rider comparison is flawed. Justin Gatlin was busted on carbon isotope alone; all his T/E ratios were fine but someone knew to look anyway for synthetic testosterone using IRMS. The existence or result of a T/E test is absolutely irrelevant if someone shows up synthetic testosterone on the carbon isotope test.

    I would also like to see the paper itself, not just the press release, and see what comment they have on the statistical significance of the population of people they have sampled. It doesn't look that big to me.
    Le Blaireau (1)
  • DaveyLDaveyL Posts: 5,167
    If anything this paper should serve as a call to test directly using IRMS. A "false positive" on the T/E would be thrown out when the IRMS came back negative - by the rules it must in that case be reported as "inconclusive". The other possibility is that someone is taking synthetic testosterone and still passing the T/E test - hence, just use the IRMS test straight off. More expense though.
    Le Blaireau (1)
  • don keydon key Posts: 494
    Im not sure about this testosterone tasting ,I have a bad nut allergy.
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,774
    DaveyL wrote:
    If anything this paper should serve as a call to test directly using IRMS. A "false positive" on the T/E would be thrown out when the IRMS came back negative - by the rules it must in that case be reported as "inconclusive". The other possibility is that someone is taking synthetic testosterone and still passing the T/E test - hence, just use the IRMS test straight off. More expense though.

    Quite. That's kind of why I posted it - If the paper is good and accurate, it would merit looking at the way the testing is carried out to see if they can refine the process and use IRMS when its likely to yield results.
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • ContrelaMontreContrelaMontre Posts: 3,027
    Perhaps as part of the biological passport scheme (splutter!) they could do gene testing of elite athletes which could identify such things as existence of the gene which produces that enzyme.

    Or more likely, if I were a rider on the con why not get tested for that gene - if I found out I am del/del then I could slap on as many testosterone patches to my balls as I feel like, knowing no-one's gonna catch me.

    Rule No.10 // It never gets easier, you just go faster
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