First p*ncture on my new roadbike!

grayo59
grayo59 Posts: 722
edited March 2008 in Road beginners
Fortunately it happened right at the end of my last ride (Friday) without me realising it, but the tyre was flat when I went to ride again this afternoon.

Anyhoo, the lbs had supplied a puncture repair kit (3 plastic levers and 6 self adhesive patches) and so I tried a repair.

Rear tyre but dead easy as the puncture site was obvious and rightly or wrongly I just popped the bit of tube out, (I checked inside the tube for glass, thorn, metal fragments)roughed it up and stuck on the patch. (Should I have taken the wheel out?)

I did three miles near my house and as all seemed ok I did another twenty and surprise surprise the tyre is still up.

Now, can I leave it or should I be replacing the tube or what?
__________________
......heading for the box, but not too soon I hope!

Comments

  • topdude
    topdude Posts: 1,557
    Looks like you did all the right things, most important is checking very carefully inside and outside the tyre for the offending sharp object. No problem with pulling the tube out to repair if the puncture is in an obvious place. Also no need to replace the repaired tube it will be fine.
    He is not the messiah, he is a very naughty boy !!
  • Sometimes you wont have anything there but there will be two holes in the tube. This is a pinch flat and happens when you haven't inflated your tyre enough. A good pre-ride check will prevent this though.
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Personally I'm not a fan of patching up tubes, I'd rather just replace them.

    I think that's largely due to a batch of tubes that would refuse to have a patch stick to them. Since then I bought a box of 25 Conti tubes, and haven't felt the need to repair them. Wasteful I know, but I'm lazy.
    I like bikes...

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  • azzerb
    azzerb Posts: 208
    Not had to touch one yet *touch wood*

    But I always carry two tubes around with me, and not too keen on using patches. Yep, the modern wasteful generation in full force i know, but i'd rather have the peace of mind on a downhill that the adhesive isn't going to go or anything dodgy.
  • jellybellywmb
    jellybellywmb Posts: 1,379
    I change the tube and then repair the tube at leisure and then use that as a spare cos I am eco friendly and very very tight :)

    I have a tube on my MTB with 6 patches on and still stays fully inflated.
    "BEER" Proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy
  • topdude
    topdude Posts: 1,557
    I can't see any problem with patching a tube as long as it is a good repair. Remember, when inflated the tube can only expand to fit the inside space of the tyre and rim so the patch will be pressed harder against the tube as the pressure increases. At 80 / 100 / 120 psi that patch is not going anywhere.
    I might draw the line at half a dozen patches though and succumb to a new tube. :wink:
    He is not the messiah, he is a very naughty boy !!
  • jellybellywmb
    jellybellywmb Posts: 1,379
    I have sentimental attachment to the tube now and could not bear to part with it.
    "BEER" Proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy
  • heavymental
    heavymental Posts: 2,076
    topdude wrote:
    I can't see any problem with patching a tube as long as it is a good repair. Remember, when inflated the tube can only expand to fit the inside space of the tyre and rim so the patch will be pressed harder against the tube as the pressure increases. At 80 / 100 / 120 psi that patch is not going anywhere.
    I might draw the line at half a dozen patches though and succumb to a new tube. :wink:

    I'd go with that. Unless you're very stingy with your vulcanising solution its not going to move. Even if you are stingy the edges will all curl up when you inflate it so it'll just look plain wrong...or not work in the first place. I find repairing punctures quite therapeutic so I'll always go for the repair and rarely carry a spare tube, unless its very cold out. A repair only takes 2 minutes anyway.
  • DavidTQ
    DavidTQ Posts: 943
    topdude wrote:
    I can't see any problem with patching a tube as long as it is a good repair. Remember, when inflated the tube can only expand to fit the inside space of the tyre and rim so the patch will be pressed harder against the tube as the pressure increases. At 80 / 100 / 120 psi that patch is not going anywhere.
    I might draw the line at half a dozen patches though and succumb to a new tube. :wink:

    I'd go with that. Unless you're very stingy with your vulcanising solution its not going to move. Even if you are stingy the edges will all curl up when you inflate it so it'll just look plain wrong...or not work in the first place. I find repairing punctures quite therapeutic so I'll always go for the repair and rarely carry a spare tube, unless its very cold out. A repair only takes 2 minutes anyway.

    I carry a spare tube and patch the tube at home. I like patched tubes a badge of honour :D
  • Tel7
    Tel7 Posts: 9
    Sorry to hijack the thread but don't think a new thread is worthwhile for what I hope is a simple question.

    I am looking to purchase some new inner tubes to carry out with me in case of a puncture.

    My tyres are Schrader Values with 26 x 2.35 marked on the sides.

    Which size of inner tubes will I need? I see lots with 26 x 2.1 and 26 x 1.95-2.

    Will they both be ok as they need to be slighter smaller to fit inside the tyre or is there one size I should be putting in?

    Thanks
  • dazzawazza
    dazzawazza Posts: 462
    If the puncture location is obvious I find it quicker to repair it than replacing the tube.
    I use self adhesive patches, which are b100dy marvellous. :lol:
  • alfablue
    alfablue Posts: 8,497
    Tel7: ideally the tube would state a range including the tyre size. You will probably be okay with the tubes you have, you can get larger tubes than 2.1 though there are fewer of them around, like this one. Its a Bontrager so your local Trek LBS may have them.
  • Tel7
    Tel7 Posts: 9
    alfablue wrote:
    Tel7: ideally the tube would state a range including the tyre size. You will probably be okay with the tubes you have, you can get larger tubes than 2.1 though there are fewer of them around, like this one. Its a Bontrager so your local Trek LBS may have them.
    Thanks for the reply :)
  • I had my first puncture not long ago. It was sooo random. I was having some problems with the front tyre not pumping up, so I took it to a shop to check out. They did their thing and the next day I went for a cycle. Not long after I got home I heard a big bang noise come from the lobby and my front tyre was flat!!! I'm glad that didn't happen when I was actually out cycling. :D
  • Lagavulin
    Lagavulin Posts: 1,688
    I just sling mine after a puncture. I do have a couple of sets of Park Tools self-adhesive repair kits kicking around but I can't be bothered.

    I find if you buy your tubes in bulk they're usually cheap enough. If I paid £4.99 a tube I might be tempted to try the repair option mind.
  • blorg
    blorg Posts: 1,169
    I have cycled thousands of km on patched tubes, they really aren't a risk at all.

    It's always a good idea to carry a repair kit as well as a tube- they are tiny and covers you in case you re-puncture the replacement tube (happens often enough, especially if you miss the offending object.)

    Had my first puncture of the year this morning!
  • MegaCycle
    MegaCycle Posts: 236
    I'm with reddragon. Can't be arsed fixing the blighters. I just take a spare with me and pop it on.

    You can always repair it when you get home if you want to.
  • Doobz
    Doobz Posts: 2,800
    I dont fix punctures either - If it were a MTB or BMX wheel then deffo as the patches seem to stick a bit better.. On my 700 x 23's I just wack a new tube in - I am sure they are only like £10 for 3 Decent continetal ones
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