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C2C

ZygiteZygite Posts: 142
edited December 2007 in Tour & expedition
In spring a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of doing something a bit different on a bike....so why not the Sustrans C2C.

I'm planning the trip using my refurbished old claud butler hybrid, panniers containing credit card, waterproofs and basic going-ashore rig.

I do a lot of road cycling but have done very little off-road. Has anyone done this route and can recommend tyres (knobblies, or will my semi-slicks suffice?) or give any other useful advice?

Thanks in anticipation....
Cycle killer? Qu'est ce que c'est?

Posts

  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    Assuming you don't choose the off-road options, semi-slicks should be fine. I did it some years ago, but I recall only one muddy track - a descent, so I reckon drive traction is not an issue. There are also some fine gravel paths, again semi-slicks are fine, the vast majority is on tarmac. I would probably choose to do it on some Schwalbe Marathons or similar for more puncture protection, higher pressures and better rolling resistance.
  • ZygiteZygite Posts: 142
    Thanks, however I'm foolishly tempted by the off-road bits. Knobblies a 'must' there, I take it?
    Cycle killer? Qu'est ce que c'est?
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    Zygite wrote:
    Thanks, however I'm foolishly tempted by the off-road bits. Knobblies a 'must' there, I take it?
    I haven't done the off road bits but I guess that will depend a lot on the weather, I suppose it is reasonable to expect wet and mud, in this country and at that altitude! Yes I would go knobbly.
  • ZygiteZygite Posts: 142
    Just found some other useful advice on the MTB forums. Thanks again.
    Cycle killer? Qu'est ce que c'est?
  • ash68ash68 Posts: 320
    most of the route takes in old railway lines, cycle paths and minor roads. Like Alfablue said, marathon or marathon plus tyres will be fine. I used marathon plus tyres and had no problems. Think the only problem you may encounter is if you use the old coach road which i believe is very rough and only suitable for mountain bikes. It is also apparently very exposed in bad weather and can get very boggy.
  • Zygite wrote:
    In spring a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of doing something a bit different on a bike....so why not the Sustrans C2C.

    I'm planning the trip using my refurbished old claud butler hybrid, panniers containing credit card, waterproofs and basic going-ashore rig.

    I do a lot of road cycling but have done very little off-road. Has anyone done this route and can recommend tyres (knobblies, or will my semi-slicks suffice?) or give any other useful advice?

    Thanks in anticipation....

    Your set up is fine. Ive done it on a hybrid, a road bike and a tourer with no problems. I would not recommend the Old Coach Road unless you have a mountain bike and are very fit if you want to have a satisfactory experience. It's wet, slippy and rocky. Equally the shortcut up hartside is anything but a shortcut. Stick to the road here. All the other 'off road' bits are track beds from disused railways and will be fine.

    Enjoy.
  • ZygiteZygite Posts: 142
    Thanks for the advice re the coach road bit. Don't quite know when we're going yet - if it's during a spell of good weather we might try that part anyway - doing the route in three days should give us some time to get lost or revert to two feet'n'pushin' if needs be... I hope.

    In an ideal world I'd get to the end then turn round and ride back the on-road way on the road bike...
    Cycle killer? Qu'est ce que c'est?
  • Zygite wrote:
    Thanks for the advice re the coach road bit. Don't quite know when we're going yet - if it's during a spell of good weather we might try that part anyway - doing the route in three days should give us some time to get lost or revert to two feet'n'pushin' if needs be... I hope.

    In an ideal world I'd get to the end then turn round and ride back the on-road way on the road bike...

    Even in good weather you'll have to want to enjoy a good push ;-) My pals did not enjoy the experience.
  • PHcpPHcp Posts: 2,748
    If it's wet, the Grouse Moor from Rookhope is worth avoiding on anything less than a MTB.
    I prefered tho old route where you turmed off before Rookhope and went via Townfield and Ramshaw before joining the Waskerley Way. It maybe a few miles longer but misses the aptly named Crawleyside.
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