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Can I use a 1:50,000 map?

FSR_XCFSR_XC Posts: 2,258
edited November 2007 in MTB beginners
Just wondering if it is possible to use a 1:50 000 map to navigate a XC route or if you need a 1:25 000?

Thinking for both maps and poss gps navigation.
Stumpjumper FSR 09/10 Pro Carbon, Genesis Vapour CX20 ('17)Carbon, Rose Xeon CW3000 '14, Raleigh R50

http://www.visiontrack.com

Posts

  • stumpyjonstumpyjon Posts: 4,069
    Yes you can use a 1:50000 map for both navigation and setting routes for your GPS.

    My personal preference is 1:25000 for the extra detail, I particularly like having field boundaries marked to work out exactly where I am.

    Because of my preference for 1:25000 I chose to go with Tracklogs when I bought a GPS because they cover the whole country at 1:25000, MemoryMap only do limited areas such as National parks at 1:25000 but do cover the whole country at 1:50000.

    My Garmin Vista HCx doesn't actually display OS maps, just Garmins Topo GB map which is supposed to be based on OS maps but doesn't show anywhere near the detail.

    I still carry a 1:25000 map when using my Garmin, just don't have to look at it as often.
    It's easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission.

    I've bought a new bike....ouch - result
    Can I buy a new bike?...No - no result
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    I much prefer the 25000: I photo the maps and put them on my phone!
  • FSR_XCFSR_XC Posts: 2,258
    Has anyone tried this:

    www.viewranger.com
    Stumpjumper FSR 09/10 Pro Carbon, Genesis Vapour CX20 ('17)Carbon, Rose Xeon CW3000 '14, Raleigh R50

    http://www.visiontrack.com
  • stumpyjonstumpyjon Posts: 4,069
    There's a review of it in the current issue of Singletrack magazine along with Tracklogs, MemoryMap & Anquet.

    From the article I get the impression it is the future but we're not quite there yet. They recommmended Tracklogs as the best current mapping software out of the four they'd tested (which is good cause that's what I bought :D ).
    It's easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission.

    I've bought a new bike....ouch - result
    Can I buy a new bike?...No - no result
  • FSR_XCFSR_XC Posts: 2,258
    I read the review.
    Stumpjumper FSR 09/10 Pro Carbon, Genesis Vapour CX20 ('17)Carbon, Rose Xeon CW3000 '14, Raleigh R50

    http://www.visiontrack.com
  • dave_hilldave_hill Posts: 3,877
    It's perfectly possible to navigate accurately using both the Landranger (1:50000) and Explorer (1:25000) maps. However, the Explorers obviously give more detail such as individual field walls, etc. which can make life easier.

    From a personal point of view, I don't hold with GPS at all. The screens are too small to show a good amount of the surrounding area to let you pin-point distant landmarks and I find that the batteries on maps last a lot longer too...

    Granted a GPS unit isn't going to blow all over in a gale and it won't turn into a pile of soggy mush in the peeing rain. However in twenty-ood years of outdoors shenanigans, I've never had a problems with paper maps. I don't see any reason to change so I won't!
    Give a home to a retired Greyhound. Tia Greyhound Rescue
    Help for Heroes
    JayPic
  • personally i prefer 1:50,000 but thats only because i keep riding of the 1:25,000 and get just a little lost but it is much better for detail especialy if your not using well marked tracks.
    Ride it hard on a hardtail
  • stumpyjonstumpyjon Posts: 4,069
    From a personal point of view, I don't hold with GPS at all. The screens are too small to show a good amount of the surrounding area to let you pin-point distant landmarks and I find that the batteries on maps last a lot longer too...

    GPSs don't replace maps (you still need to carry one, and you're right the screens are to too small (and the maps too useless) to navigate directly from. However a GPS does come into it's own if you've pre-planned a ride, it can mean that you don't stop to check the map anywhere near as often and can prevent you from shooting past a turning on a long downhill (we've all done it). Batteries last a long time, easily get a full days riding out of mine and it takes normal rechargeable AAs so I can always a carry a couple of spares.

    Is a GPS the most important bike accessory you'll ever own, IMHO no, but if you have the cash and you like gadgets they can be useful and add to the riding experience.
    It's easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission.

    I've bought a new bike....ouch - result
    Can I buy a new bike?...No - no result
  • dave_hilldave_hill Posts: 3,877
    I must admit to being a bit of a map fetishist - I love them and I can spend hours just poring over one.

    I do a tremenduous amount of planning if I'm going to try a new route and I have an uncanny knack for memorising where I'm supposed to be going. Even if I've never ridden a route before I can usually find my way round with minimum referrals to the map.

    But that's just me, I am a bit of a smart-alec after all!!!
    Give a home to a retired Greyhound. Tia Greyhound Rescue
    Help for Heroes
    JayPic
  • Father FaffFather Faff Posts: 1,176
    I find it much easier to simply look at a 1:25000 map, plan my route, memorise it and off we go. Forget a GPS or even taking the map.

    Mr Very Smart Alec.
    Commencal Meta 5.5.1
    Scott CR1
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