Forum home Road cycling forum The bottom bracket

Cycling Pictures

CyclingBantamCyclingBantam Posts: 1,299
edited October 2007 in The bottom bracket
My front room has a spot on the wall that would be perfectly complemented by a good cycling picture. I would like a picture from one of the big professional Cycling races from within the last 10 years. Does anyone have any reccomendations of good iconic pictures and/or places I could get them from?

Thanks in advance. :D

Posts

  • Just seen the iconic pictures thread. Sorry. :oops:
  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    You can order some of Graham Watson's photos as prints (as seen in the "Iconic pictures" thread) - not cheap though:
    http://grahamwatson.safeshopper.com/1/cat1.htm?520

    If you do bite the bullet and get one, let us know which one you went for!
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    Right next to me as I type, I have a framed poster of the Tour going up the Galibier from the Lautaret side, with La Meije in the background. It is quite recent, but in pre compuslory helmet days (2002, I think).

    Fixed carefully to the poster is a photo image of me climbing the same slope last year. I have cut myself out very carefully and inserted myself into the peloton. It takes guests a while to notice me in there! My vanity knows know bounds!

    Anyway, the poster seems to come from totalposter.com:

    http://www.totalposter.com/?cat=210&product_id=4338

    and is available in various formats, at various prices.

    Having now seen these prices, I realise what a generous leaving gift that was from my former employer!


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • popettepopette Posts: 2,089
    pneumatic - your poster is amazing, I love it. It just makes your jaw drop doesn't it?

    What was it like doing it for real?
  • CHRISNOIRCHRISNOIR Posts: 1,400
    Why not try the 'Girls In Lycra Shorts' thread for some much needed inspiration. They're all very er, artistic... :wink:
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    popette wrote:
    pneumatic - your poster is amazing, I love it. It just makes your jaw drop doesn't it?

    What was it like doing it for real?

    Actually, I came down that way, after having climbed the Telegraphe and Galibier from the North. As I rounded the bend that gives onto the view in the poster, I recognised it immediately and my numb sense of sheer exhaustion turned to tears of joy. pride etc..

    I flagged down a car and asked them to take my picture and then I just stood and gazed at the view. Years previously, I had skied down the mountain in the background. That was a thrilling day, too.

    Telegraphe + Galibier remains the most gruelling thing I ever did on a bike, including Alpe d'Huez (the next day) and Ventoux (this summer). Having the poster beforehand to motivate me, and since to remember it by, was part of the whole escapade.

    If you're really bored, long-winded accounts of all this and more can be found at:

    http://www.workhouse8.co.uk/alps.html


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • popettepopette Posts: 2,089
    oh censored ! was planning to do it as a training run for the etape. Beacon Ruth said:
    Don't go over the Croix de Fer unless you're confident you can get over the Telegraphe and the Galibier too (or back over the Croix de Fer again!),
    and I just thought I'd be able to manage it by next June but now I'm not so sure. I'm thinking that an average gradient of 7% doesn't sound too bad but I suppose when you're climbing for 18km, it must be hideous. I've got to go over the tourmalet by next July though and that is a similar climb I think.
    what have i let myself in for? I'll definitely check out those accounts you link to - thanks :)
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    Don't let me put you off it! If you want to do it, you will do it. I did. It just hurts a bit in places. The worst part of the climb from either side is the last 8km or so. It gets steep there. The rest of it is moderate and manageable.

    The trouble is, there is nowhere in these islands where you can prepare for Alpine climbs. There is nothing long enough or well-enough engineered to replicate them.

    More worrying is your plan to do it in June - some years it isn't open that early.

    Anyway, important as physical training is (spend the Winter building leg strength), I find psychological preparation vital so spend plenty of time staring at photos like the one in the poster and dreaming of success.

    That way, you WILL succeed and you will feel GREAT afterwards.


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • chunkytfgchunkytfg Posts: 535
    pneumatic wrote:
    popette wrote:
    pneumatic - your poster is amazing, I love it. It just makes your jaw drop doesn't it?

    What was it like doing it for real?

    Actually, I came down that way, after having climbed the Telegraphe and Galibier from the North. As I rounded the bend that gives onto the view in the poster, I recognised it immediately and my numb sense of sheer exhaustion turned to tears of joy. pride etc..

    I flagged down a car and asked them to take my picture and then I just stood and gazed at the view. Years previously, I had skied down the mountain in the background. That was a thrilling day, too.

    Telegraphe + Galibier remains the most gruelling thing I ever did on a bike, including Alpe d'Huez (the next day) and Ventoux (this summer). Having the poster beforehand to motivate me, and since to remember it by, was part of the whole escapade.

    If you're really bored, long-winded accounts of all this and more can be found at:

    http://www.workhouse8.co.uk/alps.html

    That is a very inspiring read. Well done on your acheivements.
    FCN 7

    FCN 4

    if you use irrational measures to measure me, expect me to behave irrationally to measure up
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    Thanks Chunky, glad you enjoyed it.

    I'm currently gestating another adventure for next year, but closer to home this time; a circumnavigation of Scotland. Down the East coast, along the Border, up the West Coast and Outer Hebrides, over the top, around Orkney and back home again. It looks like about 1600 miles. Dreaming about it might well get me through the Winter and, you never know, I might even do it!


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • PirahnaPirahna Posts: 1,315
    Pneumatic, love the picture.

    I borrowed a Tour 2007 advertising piccy from a Met Line tube train and have it hanging in the kitchen.
  • ut_och_cyklaut_och_cykla Posts: 1,594
    Love the website. We've stayed and cycled from La Grave too, camped in the little campsite below the village. HAd a lovely meal in the last hotel restaurant, opposite the ski lift. Magic waking up to the sight of that glacier hanging there, moaning and crunching as the sun warms it. MAgic. And the Alpe is magic too, nothing special road or view wise but at the same time fantastic. I'm going back again.. :)
  • andypandyp Posts: 8,129
    popette wrote:
    oh censored ! was planning to do it as a training run for the etape. Beacon Ruth said:
    Don't go over the Croix de Fer unless you're confident you can get over the Telegraphe and the Galibier too (or back over the Croix de Fer again!),
    and I just thought I'd be able to manage it by next June but now I'm not so sure. I'm thinking that an average gradient of 7% doesn't sound too bad but I suppose when you're climbing for 18km, it must be hideous. I've got to go over the tourmalet by next July though and that is a similar climb I think.
    what have i let myself in for? I'll definitely check out those accounts you link to - thanks :)
    If you're well trained for the Etape the route that Ruth and I recommended is tough but achievable. It's 100 miles but the last 25 of that are downhill (no kidding). So you've got a ride of 75 miles with three mountains thrown in. Take all day over it, stop for coffee at the top of the Croix de Fer, have lunch in Valloire (between the Telegraphe and Galibier), enjoy the views and it suddenly looks a lot more achievable.

    Rides like this are achievable by most, you just need to ensure you train well for them. With the Etape as your target you'll do this so it'll be a tough day but one you'll remember for the rest of your life.
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    Good point, Andy, about the last 25 miles being downhill. After all the climbing, that was seriously good fun. In fact, the ride from the top of Galibier to Grenoble (if you resist the temptation to go up Alpe d'Huez) is 50ish miles pretty much all downhill, through some of the finest scenery you could wish for.

    I was extolling its virtues just recently to a mate of mine, who looked pained and said "Yeah, I've ridden up it from Grenoble!"


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • any shot of the leading pros going up over the Gerradsbergen in the Tour of Flanders is WAY better than some sunny mountain pass. I had the good fortune to do the RVV sportif this year and it gave me goosebumps as I stomped up that climb, knowing that Boonen and co. were going to duke it out on there less than 24 hrs later....
    Flemish fans going nuts packed onto that steep part of the hill at the top near the chapel with one or two riders going past, leg muscles ripped and bending their cranks = awesome and inspiring.

    End of.
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    Sounds great - let's see a picture!


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • pneumatic wrote:
    Sounds great - let's see a picture!

    the mac daddy of cycling, forget Paris Roubaix and muddy shots, forget the steep climbs of LBL, forget the poncy capi of MSR; you want to be in this shot either as a rider or as a fan.

    4515600155.jpg

    Two belgians duking it out mano a mano and one of them a world champ.
    C L A S S I C
  • and yes, I have a Lion Of Flanders flag in my garage bought just off the square at the start of FLanders this year after we watched them pedal off. I then met Adri Van Der Poel in the next sidestreet who I got to shake hands with.
    I did a little sex wee at that point as my life became complete :oops:
  • Richrd2205Richrd2205 Posts: 1,267
    pneumatic wrote:
    I'm currently gestating another adventure for next year, but closer to home this time; a circumnavigation of Scotland. Down the East coast, along the Border, up the West Coast and Outer Hebrides, over the top, around Orkney and back home again. It looks like about 1600 miles. Dreaming about it might well get me through the Winter and, you never know, I might even do it!

    I was planning to do a shorter version of this in May (I was going to miss the hebrides & had worked it out to be around 1000 miles), but broke my wrist in April & was in a stookie for the time I had meant to do it. Unfortunately, I'll not have the time next year, so my first opportunity will be 2009, but can't see my SO agreeing given that we'll be married & co-habiting by then...

    So jealous of you now...
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    You could try enthusing your SO about the joys of womaning a support vehicle (and maybe riding with you on some stretches). Imagine her sitting behind the wheel feeling really proud of you. Early in a marriage, you might even get away with it!

    That said, I was watching the x-alps challenge on the TV last night with my boy and just at the bit where the Scottish competitor's wife was singing his praises from the driving seat of their 4x4, my wife passed by and said "don't imagine I would ever do that for you, you're on your own mate!"

    Nae luck there, then!


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • Richrd2205Richrd2205 Posts: 1,267
    pneumatic wrote:
    You could try enthusing your SO about the joys of womaning a support vehicle (and maybe riding with you on some stretches). Imagine her sitting behind the wheel feeling really proud of you. Early in a marriage, you might even get away with it!

    That said, I was watching the x-alps challenge on the TV last night with my boy and just at the bit where the Scottish competitor's wife was singing his praises from the driving seat of their 4x4, my wife passed by and said "don't imagine I would ever do that for you, you're on your own mate!"

    Nae luck there, then!

    TY for the tips, but I think my dreams of 1000+ mile rides will need to go on hold for the immediate future :cry::cry::cry:
    I think the fact that we don't have a car may prevent me promoting the "holiday with something extra" line.
    & she's no a keen cyclist (80 miles this year after buying her a gorgeous bike).
    I do have an exciting stag weekend planned involving Glasgow-Fort William & back planned for next year, so I can't complain (too much) (PM me for invites :wink: )

    The X-Alps programme was quite fun, wasn't it? Possibly a bit too extreme for me tho...

    Please keep the board updated if you manage your ride next year!

    & apologies for hijacking the thread...
  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    pneumatic wrote:
    Sounds great - let's see a picture!
    stephan_vanfleteren.JPG

    Check out the series of pictures here - gives you an idea of the build up to the race coming through - electric!
    http://www.stephanvanfleteren.com/recent_projects.htm
Sign In or Register to comment.