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Bike crash - would you use it again?

FlambesFlambes Posts: 191
edited October 2007 in Workshop
About a month ago I was wiped out by a large vehicle.
Bike was written off by my LBS for insurance puposes, but I'm wondering if I could make something of my ex pride and joy.

The back of the bike was most affected, rear wheel (Rolf Vector Pro) snapped, my rear mech hanger is bent right in, and my rear mech will be toast.
Scratches to my STIs, handlebars and pedals on the RHS.
So I reckon a new rear wheel, cut off the hanger and make it into a single speed.

Frame was a Condor Aluminium with carbon forks, carbon seatpin.
Can't see any damage to anything else, frame looks OK apart from the hanger, but would you risk it? Or the chances of critical failure too high?

Posts

  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    As your frame is aluminium, even minor damage could be a potential source of failure in the future - any minor crease or ding in the metal creates a stress-raiser and potential failure point - examine it carefully and minutely and look for cracks around any of the tube joints. Worth checking your frame over to make sure it isn't bent - wrap a piece of string around the headtube and back to the rear drop-outs - the string needs to be exactly the same dimension on either side, otherwise your tracking could be out. Roll the bike along the ground in a straight line - does the rear wheel track immediately behind the front? Are both wheels parallel? Whilst converting it to a singlespeed/fixed wheel is feasible - you'll need to source a suitable 130mm rear hub like a White Bros ENO- don't contemplate cold-setting an aluminium frame!
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • FlambesFlambes Posts: 191
    Thanks for the reply, very comprehensive.
    I'll do the string thing, good idea. Can't see any damage to the frame apart from the hangar, but it may well be slightly off kilter. Was also a bit worried about the carbon stuff, but again, can't see anything that might suddenly let go.
  • maddog 2maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    just check the alignment and all weld areas (minutely)

    If it looks okay and straight then you'll be fine IMO.

    I've crashed my mtb hundreds of times. You wouldn't dream of buying a new frame every time.

    Is the mech hanger part of the frame or is it replaceable?

    The SS thing is okay except SS are pretty pointless IMO. I'd try one first......
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • FlambesFlambes Posts: 191
    The hanger is replaceable, but the bit behind which it is attached to is also bent, hence the frame written off by the LBS. Dropout looks OK though.

    If I can't use it as a SS then it would be bin time and I don't really want to do that. Like the idea of a very lightweight commuter though, and yes I'm going with the SS mania!
  • maddog 2maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    I'd try and bend it back

    I know alu doesn't bend well (well, bend back well) but the mech hanger only has to hold the mech, it's not structural to the rding of the bike itself.

    Bend it back, buy a new hanger and see if you can get the new hanger fastened on somehow (drill + retap perhaps, add a bolt perhaps?)

    As long as the hanger is straight and fairly solid then it should work as a commuter.

    Or go for a hub-geared wheel

    ... there must be a way to avoid SSing it :x
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • it is likely to be a vertical drop-out frame, so getting good chain tension as a single speed will not be easy unless you use one of the special eccentric hubs
    Recipe: shave legs sparingly, rub in embrocation and drizzle with freshly squeezed baby oil.
  • eheh Posts: 4,854
    The drop out should bend back, aluminium is pretty soft. I'd ask the LBS to do it with their proper tool, but make sure you agree upfront that you understand it could snap and if it does you won't blame them. I've bent back drop outs on 2 aluminium bikes and it is fine, the big problems start happening if it needs to be done anymore times.

    If you want to singlespeed it (as opposed to fixed), look at On-ones sites for parts 'cos the sell a chain tensioner although I believe it relys on screwing in where the mech should be. I'm sure their are other companies as well, but I'm afraid I don't know who else.
  • top_bhoytop_bhoy Posts: 1,424
    Frankly, if you've got your money for the bike from the insurance company - why take chances with safety? Bin it!!! Buy the replacement bike and enjoy your cycling with piece of mind!!!
  • FlambesFlambes Posts: 191
    All good ideas here - the insurance isn't settled yet, so am not doing anything to it at the moment, but there's a bike jumble very soon near me, so may be looking for parts for it.

    Don't want to bin it, because I want my garage full of as many bikes as I can, but on the flip side, my face has seen enough tarmac for a while, so potential weakness are being taken seriously.

    Thanks all.
  • rustychiselrustychisel Posts: 3,444
    Top_Bhoy wrote:
    Frankly, if you've got your money for the bike from the insurance company - why take chances with safety? Bin it!!! Buy the replacement bike and enjoy your cycling with piece of mind!!!

    No mate!!! That's not the spirit that made this country great! :twisted:

    Use it, bend it, make it a fixie. Hell, file the dropouts and ride the thing. There's no investment it it, that's been covered by insurance. Just be careful and look out for problems mainfesting themselves.

    Me. I'd do it 'cause I like the challenge and because I'm a scrooge.
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  • araceraracer Posts: 1,649
    The thing to consider is what bits have got damaged and so are failure possibilities. I'd suggest that anything handlebar or fork related should be binned, since a failure in that area will leave you eating tarmac. Not necessarily so for frame damage - the back end failing is unlikely to cause you to crash, and you should also notice it going before it does. I had a down tube fail, and that was very non-catastophic (the bike gently subsided!)
  • top_bhoytop_bhoy Posts: 1,424
    No mate!!! That's not the spirit that made this country great! :twisted:

    I guess I'm just not made of the right stuff :)
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