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pavement *lips*

in the wirein the wire Posts: 79
edited October 2007 in Commuting chat
Is that what they're called?

The bit that nutures you on to a cycle path / pavement... whatever

Why are they all so badly designed, when it's not just pavement cyclists needing to use them but:

-pedestrians
-wheelchair users
-kids on go-carts
-roller bladers
-davros the dalek leader
-the daleks

Every day i go over

-lumps 2 inches thick
-25 degree brick inclines

Who designs these things? Is it town planners, architects or builders or civic things

It's definately not davros

Posts

  • Fab FoodieFab Foodie Posts: 5,155
    FYI
    Daleks can now levitate...stairs and kerbs are no longer the obstacle for world domination they once were. It's 2007 now, things have moved on.

    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1
  • Fab Foodie wrote:
    FYI
    Daleks can now levitate...stairs and kerbs are no longer the obstacle for world domination they once were. It's 2007 now, things have moved on.

    Come on, don't be a censored

    not in the mood
  • Fab Foodie wrote:
    FYI
    Daleks can now levitate...stairs and kerbs are no longer the obstacle for world domination they once were. It's 2007 now, things have moved on.

    Come on, don't be a fool

    not in the mood

    Wow, fab foodie, I said 'censored ' and it translated it as 'fool'

    The most annoying word ever

    Are you hanging around waiting for cycle chat to come back up BTW?
  • Fab FoodieFab Foodie Posts: 5,155
    Fab Foodie wrote:
    FYI
    Daleks can now levitate...stairs and kerbs are no longer the obstacle for world domination they once were. It's 2007 now, things have moved on.

    Come on, don't be a fool

    not in the mood

    Wow, fab foodie, I said 'fool' and it translated it as 'fool'

    The most annoying word ever

    Are you hanging around waiting for cycle chat to come back up BTW?

    Might be :lol:

    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1
  • Fab Foodie wrote:
    Fab Foodie wrote:
    FYI
    Daleks can now levitate...stairs and kerbs are no longer the obstacle for world domination they once were. It's 2007 now, things have moved on.

    Come on, don't be a fool

    not in the mood

    Wow, fab foodie, I said 'fool' and it translated it as 'fool'

    The most annoying word ever

    Are you hanging around waiting for cycle chat to come back up BTW?

    Might be :lol:

    Are you a sub-hensile brick-wad from Freuds's book of jokes saying something glib like

    It was not me, it was 'my education'
  • Fab FoodieFab Foodie Posts: 5,155
    Fab Foodie wrote:
    Fab Foodie wrote:
    FYI
    Daleks can now levitate...stairs and kerbs are no longer the obstacle for world domination they once were. It's 2007 now, things have moved on.

    Come on, don't be a fool

    not in the mood

    Wow, fab foodie, I said 'fool' and it translated it as 'fool'

    The most annoying word ever

    Are you hanging around waiting for cycle chat to come back up BTW?

    Might be :lol:

    Are you a sub-hensile brick-wad from Freuds's book of jokes saying something glib like

    It was not me, it was 'my education'

    Nah, more pre-hensile high- tensile from Devon....

    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1
  • Pat920Pat920 Posts: 55
    "Drop Kerbs"
    They are designed by Highways Engineers, and are designed to be flat. They are probably installed flat but stuff moves over time (often when artics drive over them) and you get a step. The local authority should maintain them - report them in the same way as potholes and they should get fixed. Local authorities pay out to people who trip over their kerbs - it is worth it to them to maintein them properly, especially if they are reported.
  • GambatteGambatte Posts: 1,453
    Pat920 wrote:
    "Drop Kerbs"
    They are designed by Highways Engineers, and are designed to be flat. They are probably installed flat but stuff moves over time (often when artics drive over them) and you get a step. The local authority should maintain them - report them in the same way as potholes and they should get fixed. Local authorities pay out to people who trip over their kerbs - it is worth it to them to maintein them properly, especially if they are reported.

    My local council reported payouts to car drivers for damage from potholes at £14k over (i think) 3 years. They estimated about 4 times that to fetch the road up to standard....
  • phil_ss1phil_ss1 Posts: 194
    A few years back I was told by the highway officer in Leicestershire that they "have" to be installed with a 25mm step, I rang and met them after a saw a guy fall off when sliding along one when trying to mount a cyle path at an acute angle off a dual car..

    He refused to admit they should be level!

    Phil
  • PoacherPoacher Posts: 165
    Here in nottingham some have been installed with a pronounced lip, apparently deliberately. They're absolutely lethal!
    Ceps, morelles, trompettes de mort. Breakfast of champignons.
  • tardingtontardington Posts: 1,379
    Pavement lips? Do you mean the run-off bits where the kerb is much lower (I guess It's supposed to be level with the road itself) ?
  • phil_ss1phil_ss1 Posts: 194
    Hardly encourages you to "seamlessly" slip from road to cycle path!
  • fossyantfossyant Posts: 2,549
    That's why you commute on an mtb - urban off road...... my road bikes would never get over the carp my semi slicked mtb does on the commute
  • jedsterjedster Posts: 2,004
    bunny hop?

    actually, would it be sensible to have a "seamless" transition from cycle path to road - would this not encourage people to pull out too fast/without looking properly

    Surely the problem is small beer compared to the wheel eating potholes around
  • GambatteGambatte Posts: 1,453
    jedster wrote:
    bunny hop?

    dont think I'll bother trying with 700 x 23c :(
  • jeljel Posts: 758
    I think they are put in so you can retarmac over the existing surface. As someone who has raised a pavement by around an inch back in the 80s, I can testify what a labour intensive pain it is.

    Might not be right but I'd imagine that's what they're there for.
  • secretsamsecretsam Posts: 4,549
    jedster wrote:
    Surely the problem is small beer compared to the wheel eating potholes around

    Especially in a bike lane, near a school - congratulations to Aylesbury Vale DC for their highway management :evil:

    Still - on the bright side - at least there are cycle lanes now, I remember the days when...(drifts off into rose-tinted haze of memories of near-misses in Bristol)

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • The flush drop kerb used is designed to sit 25mm above the road surface and that was how they always used to be installed.

    The guidance now is that they should be installed flush at crossing points to aid wheelchair access.

    Actually laying them flush is often quite hard if you want to avoid water sitting there all the time, and with the existing ones all designed at 25mm and then messed about with as roads and/or pavements get resurfaced...... they are all over the place.
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