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Tactics for LeJog

richardjallenrichardjallen Posts: 691
I met someone a few weeks ago who was planning to do LeJog. He was saying how apparently the first few days are the hardest and after that a persons fitness improves during the ride and it gets easier from then. His tactic therefore was to ride 24hrs a day for the first 3 days. Somehow I don't think riding for 72 hrs without sleeping is either wise or possible.

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  • andypandyp Posts: 8,359
    It's possible. But definitely not wise.
  • toontratoontra Posts: 1,160
    I met someone a few weeks ago who was planning to do LeJog. He was saying how apparently the first few days are the hardest and after that a persons fitness improves during the ride and it gets easier from then. His tactic therefore was to ride 24hrs a day for the first 3 days. Somehow I don't think riding for 72 hrs without sleeping is either wise or possible.

    If he rode for 72 hours he would reach JoG in one session (averaging a leisurely 12.5 mph and using a short route).

    If he's serious then he should find out how the long-distance Audaxers do it - even they rest for 30 minutes or so every few hundred miles!


    a serious case of small cogs
  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    the first few days are the hardest
    I think that's partly due to the terrain - Cornwall and Devon can only be described as "distinctly lumpy". Your body does get accustomed to the miles I suppose, although the legs (and backside for that matter) can take a little coaxing first thing in the morning.

    I was dreading Scotland as I thought the climbs would be harder, however in the Highlands, there aren't many options in the way of roads, so the A9 features a lot, which is actually fairly easy riding.

    The last day along the north-east coast from Inverness to John O'Groats is similar to Devon - long climb, fast descent, across the river, long climb, fast descent, across the river, long climb, fast descent, across the river, long climb, fast descent, across the river..............you get the picture!
  • Bronzie wrote:
    the first few days are the hardest


    The last day along the north-east coast from Inverness to John O'Groats is similar to Devon - long climb, fast descent, across the river, long climb, fast descent, across the river, long climb, fast descent, across the river, long climb, fast descent, across the river..............you get the picture!

    I took a route straight north from Inverness over the Highlands via Lairg and Altnahara, so remote, so beautiful, so (relatively!) flat, just don't slow down below 10mph or the midges will get you!!

    Drove back along the A9, so glad I took the route I did, the stretch aroung Helmsdale looked horrendously hilly
    You can lead an elephant to water but a pencil must be lead
  • Soundswrong to me - if your fitness is low at the start how do you manage 24 hours (on the hilliest bits) a day when your fitness is lowest and your contact points less acclimatised & then reduce it as your fitness comes in. For me 100-120 miles a day is reasonable & as you get fitter you can push harder/longer if you feel like,,,,,,
    Briceyinstockport
  • toontratoontra Posts: 1,160
    Ashley_R wrote:
    I took a route straight north from Inverness over the Highlands via Lairg and Altnahara, so remote, so beautiful, so (relatively!) flat, just don't slow down below 10mph or the midges will get you!!

    That's an interesting suggestion. Do you have any idea of the mileage of this route from Inverness to JoG?


    a serious case of small cogs
  • richaricha Posts: 2,020
    a persons fitness improves during the ride and it gets easier from then
    Is it possible to get fitter on a ride without any recovery time?
  • toontra wrote:
    Ashley_R wrote:
    I took a route straight north from Inverness over the Highlands via Lairg and Altnahara, so remote, so beautiful, so (relatively!) flat, just don't slow down below 10mph or the midges will get you!!

    That's an interesting suggestion. Do you have any idea of the mileage of this route from Inverness to JoG?

    I stopped at Alness, about 10 mile north of Inverness, up to Bettyhill on the north coast, about 75 miles, left me about 50 odd for the last day

    Beautiful virtually traffic free roads (apart from an articulated Spar lorry doing about 70 on an single track road who decided to play chicken with me, he won I ended up on the verge, never shop there again!!)

    The Crask Inn is weel worth a vist as well, must be the most isolated pub in Britain, nothing for about 20 miles all round, think he relies mainly on passing trade!!
    You can lead an elephant to water but a pencil must be lead
  • toontratoontra Posts: 1,160
    Ashley_R wrote:

    I stopped at Alness, about 10 mile north of Inverness, up to Bettyhill on the north coast, about 75 miles, left me about 50 odd for the last day

    Beautiful virtually traffic free roads (apart from an articulated Spar lorry doing about 70 on an single track road who decided to play chicken with me, he won I ended up on the verge, never shop there again!!)

    The Crask Inn is weel worth a vist as well, must be the most isolated pub in Britain, nothing for about 20 miles all round, think he relies mainly on passing trade!!

    Thanks for the info Ashley. So you reckon about 135 miles in all? That's very good - the A9 alternative is reckoned to be 122 miles, so well worth the extra handful of miles for the peace & quiet (Spar vans aside!).


    a serious case of small cogs
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