Forum home Road cycling forum Tours, routes, audaxes & organised rides Sportives/audaxes/training rides

La Marmotte

vermootencpvermootencp Posts: 1,298
Hi,

I can't wait! Survival is my objective, especially given that there have been deaths on it for the last 2 years. I'm driving down to Ornon on Friday of next week and will be doing a few days of getting used to the altitude and doing the route. Might take a day trip to Ventoux dunno yet.

Anyway, any other C+ers going? Got your target times sorted out? Any advice apart from "Avoid the mad Dutchmen"?

Andy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
<font size="1">"I'll do what I can to help y'all. But the game's out there, and it's play or get played. That simple."
</font id="size1">
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
<font>"I\'ll do what I can to help y\'all. But the game\'s out there, and it\'s play or get played. That simple."
</font>
«1

Posts

  • currieinahurrycurrieinahurry Posts: 2,695
    me and demongrinder are there and a few other kingston wheelers.
    will be my first time so no advice to give!!
    tikka

    hi my name is adam... and i have a problem with posting on cycling forums.
    hi my name is adam... and i have a problem with posting on cycling forums.
  • Ken NightKen Night Posts: 2,005
    I'll be around Bourg all week-staying at Allemont

    when in Bourg I like to hang out at the Cafe Deux Mondes-soaking up coffee and <s>pastries</s>sunshine. Look out for me. I'll be glad to pass the time of day...

    Riding the Vaujanay 1/7, Prix De Rousse 4/7, and Grimpe D'Alpe 8/7, as well as the Marmotte on 7/7-Dossard 152-pink/turquoise Campag shirt



    <font size="1">"I once prayed to God for a bike, but quickly found out he didnt work that way...so I stole a bike and prayed for his forgiveness"
    </font id="size1">
    “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best..." Ernest Hemingway
  • pjm-84pjm-84 Posts: 819
    Entered this morning!

    Just come back from a weeks training at Bourg D'Oisan and climbed the Croix De Fer on the last day.

    Back out this Friday for two weeks holiday but staying further South just past Gap and since I'm in the area I thought I might as well do it.

    I'm be one of two guys in a i-Team top.

    Paul
    Paul
  • ricadusricadus Posts: 2,379
    A few days before the Marmotte, ride over the Glandon and test ride the descent or at least the first few kms until the road widens into a proper two-lane width. On the map it looks pretty straight but there are several chicane-like corners - if you get those wrong at speed you could be off the road (I saw the aftermath saw 5 crashes on that descent in 2005, one being the Dutch guy on the initial hairpins, but the others were all on faster flatter bits after the first km).

    <font color="black">london</font id="black"><font color="red">phoenix</font id="red"><font color="black">.co.uk</font id="black">
  • Ken, will try & find you for a caffiene fix. Going sans caff for 2 weeks before Marmotte! Also doing Vaujany (SiS jersey). Was planning La Mure/Met IsŠre event today but other committments took priority, censored . Impressed you are doing all the "Oisans Trophy" events. Good luck. Also riding MTB W.Cup marathon 100km in Oisans week after marmotte.

    Ed
    www.bikeandski-vercors.com
  • Ken NightKen Night Posts: 2,005
    Just a quick look before setting off for the airport.....wife tapping her foot at the door...

    Ed, it'd be good to meet-look for a lone Englander at the Deux Mondes if you get there, late 40's, short (greying) hair, likely to be wearing pastel polo shirt

    I should stay off the coffee, I know-but I'm so addicted I even have caffeinated gels for a pickmeup, after an hour and a halfs riding

    Ricadus, I know and concur about the Glandon Descent-as technical as any I've done.

    Anyone else noticed the unfeasibly high football pitch on the N side of the Glandon?

    See you there

    <font size="1">"I once prayed to God for a bike, but quickly found out he didnt work that way...so I stole a bike and prayed for his forgiveness"
    </font id="size1">
    “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best..." Ernest Hemingway
  • There are about 20 of us going over this year with 14 riding - we're wearing yellow/balck/white tops with "Logicacmg" on. I've done it 4 times and recommend the "going out early routine". My first time was over 13 hours on a hybrid and no real training, but last year I got under 9h15m for my age group gold (40-49). This year I think I might "go tourist" and enjoy the ride instead, taking photos etc. Go very careful on the Glandon descent as everyone seems to hurl over the top and some fall off very early. The Gablier messes with your mind for the last 8kms, so practice postive thinking now! AdH is all about thinking of the first beer and just finishing. It's a great ride and top atmosphere. Regards, Harry.
  • harrywolper, are your guys all from LogicaCMG? Thats nuts! I'm also with LCMG and will be going with another friend who I work with and an ex-LCMG'er. Now don't tell me you got the sports and social club to pay for half your trip or I'll flip...
  • guido298guido298 Posts: 10
    I'm a first timer on La Marmotte - can someone tell me what the form is regarding signing on/registration etc. The web site is (as usual) not much help.
  • guido, ref signing on. Several options.
    Wed 9-12, 2-5pm "Pinsello" bike shop at St Martin le Vinoux,Grenoble (careful with the visa)
    Thurs 2-8pm Alpe d'Huez ("Maison de Sport"/cinema or similar name near the finish look for the church.
    Fri 10am-10pm Alpe d'Huez as above
    Sat am before the start, near the start at the "Casino" supermarket. It used to be in the layby at the foot of the climb where the final feed station is. There is a new road layout/roundabout there so may be different this year.
    I would not leave it until the sat morning though, you will have enough to concern yourself with without worrying about picking your number up.

    Ed
    www.bikeandski-vercors.com
  • swtswt Posts: 237
    Do you have to produce a doctor's cert at signing on? Have heard lots of stories about this, some say you do and others not.

    swt
    swt
  • pjm-84pjm-84 Posts: 819
    I hate this event already.

    Just got the email confirmation and they have put me in the 40-49 group. I'm only 39 and 4/5ths

    Paul
    Paul
  • ricadusricadus Posts: 2,379
    That's OK, that means you'll have extra time in hand to get a gold.

    An extra 20 minutes in fact... that's enough time to allow you to stop at one of the bars as you enter Alpe d'Huez and have a celebratory beer before riding the final kilometer on to glory.

    <font color="black">london</font id="black"><font color="red">phoenix</font id="red"><font color="black">.co.uk</font id="black">
  • I'm going to be 31 by the time of the Martmotte. Does anyone know where I can get the medal cutoff times for that age? I'm gunning for that Bronze 8oP
  • dsoutardsoutar Posts: 1,746
    Cutoff times:
    You are Cat D so that means Gold is 8:49 and Silver is 10:35.

    Good Luck

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live." ~ Mark Twain, "Taming the Bicycle"
  • ridgeriderridgerider Posts: 2,826
    Anyone make it back yet?

    How was it?
    Half man, Half bike...and now more familiar with the work of Prostate Cancer UK
  • vermootenvermooten Posts: 2,697
    Ridgerider wrote:
    Anyone make it back yet?

    How was it?
    Hot long hilly tough but easily the best spotive ever. Missed gold by 17 minutes, next year I'm gonna pop a cap in its censored .
    You just have to ride like you never have to breathe again.

    Manchester Wheelers
  • BrixtonfixedBrixtonfixed Posts: 127
    Went round in 9:01, got gold which was v. satisfying. Without doubt the hardest physical challenge I have ever done. First half of Alpe d'Huez felt like a near-death experience but the second was pure euphoria. No idea how that happens! Scenery, organisation, feeds, atmosphere, etc. were all fantastic. And a lot of Brits this year: 350-odd according to the official stats. Highly recommended, but be prepared!
  • PedalloPedallo Posts: 30
    I flew to Geneva early last week and cycled down to the start - expected a nice bit of sunshine, but the weather wasn't good at all. Rain, hail, snow, thunder, lightning, etc...I wouldn't have fancied the Galibier in some of the conditions I experienced just a couple of days before.

    However, day of the ride the weather was sorted - and it really was an epic ride.

    It was really hot on the climb up Alpe d'Huez. I'm sure the water in my bidons was hot enough to make a nice cup of tea at one point.
  • MingstaMingsta Posts: 24
    Phew! If La Marmotte was a guy, it'd be Chuck Norris. Easily the toughest ride I've done in my 3 years on the bike but also without doubt the most satisfying.

    My experience probably echoes that of pretty much every ride report that I've read over this year. Took the Glandon nice and steady and it was okay. The telegraph was also okay, but I was starting to feel the heat a little as I was wearing a thick wool jersey and base layer. The Galibier was stunning but brutal and the Alpe D'Huez was carnage as people battled up it in the 39 degree heat. A lot of people were reduced to walking by that point, and I saw a fair few on the roadside who looked even worse off.

    I finished in just under 9 and a half hours, which was my original goal. I reckon I got the pacing right on the climbs, but lost loads of time on the decents and spent 35 minutes at the feed stations. Although I said "never again" at the top of Alpe D'Huez, I'm tempted to come back and have a crack at the gold.

    You can tell you had a good ride when you're still buzzing about it 4 days later...and La Marmotte was the greatest of them all.

    It was great to meet all of the LCMG guys and peeps from this forum, who all seemed to booked in to the same restaurant as us.
  • MingstaMingsta Posts: 24
    While we're at it, here's some random memories of the ride...though to be honest it was mostly a big blur due to the very early start and obligatory pain and suffering.

    - The awesome array of machines on display, it was like a who's who of dream bikes, Moots, Sevens, BMC Pro Machines, Orbea Orca's, Parlee's, Cervelo R3's, Lightweight wheels, every superbike and pimp wheelset you could think of was present.

    - The silence...all the british sportives I've ridden have had loads of banter. But it was like a funeral procession riding up the Glandon and Telegraphe/Galibier, just dead silence as everyone contemplated the horrors that lay ahead. The silence only helped to accentuate...

    - ...my squeeky left pedal, normally goes away after 20 mins of pedalling, but having reassembled the bike, it was louder than ever and carried on for the entire 9 hours of riding.

    - The awesome, humbling Col Du Galibier! Looking down some time after the big hairpin and seeing an endless line of cyclists snaking their way up the valley, some 400 metres below is a sight that I will never forget.

    - Being so tired at the top of the Galibier that I couldn't unclip from either pedal and had to keep pedalling for another 30 metres before I managed to kick out and get off!

    - The most bizarre cramps I've ever had! The back of the neck, underarms, triceps, forearms all seized up at various points. Fortunately, my legs were fine.

    - The cute blonde chick who poured cold water down my neck on the Alpe D'Huez...thank you!!!

    - Being so exhausted at the finish line that I didn't know whether to laugh, cry, sit down or stand up. I saw one of my chalet mates at the finish and wasn't able to put the words together, so just ended up shaking his hand repeatedly.
  • grimpeurgrimpeur Posts: 230
    Boo hoo,

    Having arrived in France overtrained, over my normal weight and with a fooked back I decided, after remembering how painful it was last year, to pull out.

    I did ride up Alpe d'Huez on the day of the Marmotte though and it was definitely warmer than last year.

    Oh and no crashes on the Glandon which is always a good thing.

    Next year I'll definitely be back.

    Well done Mingsta!
  • Steve GTSteve GT Posts: 383
    Well done to all that participated.
    This sportive is next years major cycling goal.
    Crediamo in te, bici!
    My Bikes.
  • MingstaMingsta Posts: 24
    Thanks Allen - good to see you again and hopefully we can arrange to be out in Vercor at the same time next year.

    For those of you thinking of doing it next year, give Phil from Gastrobiking.com a shout. He did a great job in ensuring we had the best possible run up to La Marmotte - 3 days of cycling in Vercor, including some decent climbs, plus lots of rest and good food. Then 2 days of rest in Alpe D'Huez (which was excellent for getting a little more used to altitude) before the big day.
  • vermootenvermooten Posts: 2,697
    Mingsta wrote:
    While we're at it, here's some random memories of the ride...though to be honest it was mostly a big blur due to the very early start and obligatory pain and suffering.

    - The awesome array of machines on display, it was like a who's who of dream bikes, Moots, Sevens, BMC Pro Machines, Orbea Orca's, Parlee's, Cervelo R3's, Lightweight wheels, every superbike and pimp wheelset you could think of was present.

    - The silence...all the british sportives I've ridden have had loads of banter. But it was like a funeral procession riding up the Glandon and Telegraphe/Galibier, just dead silence as everyone contemplated the horrors that lay ahead. The silence only helped to accentuate...

    - ...my squeeky left pedal, normally goes away after 20 mins of pedalling, but having reassembled the bike, it was louder than ever and carried on for the entire 9 hours of riding.

    - The awesome, humbling Col Du Galibier! Looking down some time after the big hairpin and seeing an endless line of cyclists snaking their way up the valley, some 400 metres below is a sight that I will never forget.

    - Being so tired at the top of the Galibier that I couldn't unclip from either pedal and had to keep pedalling for another 30 metres before I managed to kick out and get off!

    - The most bizarre cramps I've ever had! The back of the neck, underarms, triceps, forearms all seized up at various points. Fortunately, my legs were fine.

    - The cute blonde chick who poured cold water down my neck on the Alpe D'Huez...thank you!!!

    Good observations mingsta. The silence really struck me too, no nervous quipping just people getting down to work. In fact my only quip was to ask the cutie on the Alpe to marry me.

    Strange: I had parked up at the foot of Col D'Ornon cos I was staying at the top of it. I rode back down the Alpe then the 2-3 miles to the car, and felt great. I could have carried on riding too. Weird huh.
    You just have to ride like you never have to breathe again.

    Manchester Wheelers
  • Steve GTSteve GT Posts: 383
    Mingsta wrote:
    Thanks Allen - good to see you again and hopefully we can arrange to be out in Vercor at the same time next year.

    For those of you thinking of doing it next year, give Phil from Gastrobiking.com a shout. He did a great job in ensuring we had the best possible run up to La Marmotte - 3 days of cycling in Vercor, including some decent climbs, plus lots of rest and good food. Then 2 days of rest in Alpe D'Huez (which was excellent for getting a little more used to altitude) before the big day.

    Will do Mingsta, thanks for the advice.
    Crediamo in te, bici!
    My Bikes.
  • grimpeurgrimpeur Posts: 230
    I think it's also worth pointing out the vast number of other Cyclosportives available apart from the Marmotte. As I've said I've ridden the Marmotte once and was extremely dissappointed at not being able to do so this year, heck I've definitely be back to ride it next year. But! In terms of organisation and enjoyment, the Marmotte isn't that well organised.

    Try some of the other sportives in the area like the Challenge Dauphine or Vercors - Drome and you'll enjoy an event with riders who don't ride dangerously and much much better organisation and atmosphere.

    Having to watch this year it was very interesting to see things from a spectator point of view for a change. I didn't really appreciate just how fooked people look on the Alpe. Looking down the Alpe you just see one big snake of suffering winding it's way upwards.
  • Steve GTSteve GT Posts: 383
    I was in Paris last November and when I was flying back I bought a French cycling mag called 'Velo' at the airport. I cannot read or speak French but the magazine seemed to be aimed at the Sportive rider. It is the best cycling mag I have seen, their bike reviews gave the weight of all the components on the bike individually, which I thought was great. They also had a list of what I assume would have been all the Sportive's in France for 2007.
    The Marmotte stood out for me as it had 5000M of climbing, as well as the legendary climbs involved.
    The mag also reviewed the latest Madone at the time and the top of the range Cervelo which was fitted out with the lightest campy record gear. They rated the Cervello 11 out of 10!!
    Crediamo in te, bici!
    My Bikes.
  • grimpeurgrimpeur Posts: 230
    French Cycling magazines really are a shocker in that they are well written and target the right audience. Cycling Plus and Cycling Weekly don't know who the heck their target audience is and are a mis-mash as a result.

    Also have a look out for 'Le Cycle' which I think is the best.
  • vermootenvermooten Posts: 2,697
    I picked up loads of cycling mags out there. As you say, some of the mags seems to be purely about sportives. I guess it's only a matter of time before the sportive movement gets big enough here to warrant its own publication.
    You just have to ride like you never have to breathe again.

    Manchester Wheelers
Sign In or Register to comment.