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City Bike/Hybrid - Same Thing?

edited June 2007 in Commuting chat
May be starting a new job soon where I could consider a commute on my bike. I have a Giant hybrid at the moment which is great but are hybrids really cut out for commuting or are the 'city' bikes I see advertised more suitable? If so what are the differences?

Cheers

Paul

Posts

  • DavidTQDavidTQ Posts: 943
    Hybrid will do you just fine to start with for commuting, Ive started with a hybrid but am now moving to a road bike for commuting, which is the way to go as far as im concerned,make more efficient use of pedal power.

    Heres what the CTC say about city bikes :- http://www.ctc.org.uk/DesktopDefault.aspx?TabID=3792

    What sort of distance are you looking to cover for your commute?
  • BigWombleBigWomble Posts: 455
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by PaulQ</i>

    May be starting a new job soon where I could consider a commute on my bike. I have a Giant hybrid at the moment which is great but are hybrids really cut out for commuting or are the 'city' bikes I see advertised more suitable? If so what are the differences?

    Cheers

    Paul
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
    I have a Giant hybrid. For distances up to 5 miles, on urban roads, they're fine.



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  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by DavidTQ</i>

    Hybrid will do you just fine to start with for commuting, Ive started with a hybrid but am now moving to a road bike for commuting, which is the way to go as far as im concerned,make more efficient use of pedal power.

    Heres what the CTC say about city bikes :- http://www.ctc.org.uk/DesktopDefault.aspx?TabID=3792

    What sort of distance are you looking to cover for your commute?
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Cheers for that. Likely commute will be about 20 miles so need to make sure I have the right machine. I was reading the forum and saw that many people used bikes like the Kona Dew/Smoke (and others) for commuting and am undecided really.

    Cheers

    Paul
  • DavidTQDavidTQ Posts: 943
    I think at that sort of mileage you will soon be wanting a full on road bike the lower resistance from the skinny tyres and the extra top speed from taller gears will make a big difference, and the comfort of different hand positions offered by drops. Theres some good offers on Giant SCR road bikes at www.winstanleysbikes.com
  • monoimonoi Posts: 8
    I bought a Genesis Day 00 (road-style hybrid) for a 4 mile commute, and it's great. I don't know much about bikes, but I know what I like -- and I like 25mm tyres and a big front chain ring [;)].
  • peterbrpeterbr Posts: 2,076
    There are hybrids and there are hybrids. Keep it light, keep the bar low and there is little or no difference and you don't have the limitation of a road bike.

    I did 55 miles on a hybrid today in 2 1/2 hours - not bad for a bike with full mudguards a rack and for the last 7 miles two panniers full of shopping.

    The problem is most hybrids come with fat tyres a stupid upright stem and cheap components. I built mine up myself, the result is pretty similar to this:

    http://www.marinbikes.com/bicycles_2005 ... irfax.html



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  • BentMikeyBentMikey Posts: 4,895
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by peterbr</i>

    There are hybrids and there are hybrids. Keep it light, keep the bar low and there is little or no difference and you don't have the limitation of a road bike.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    What are the limitations you're referring to?

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  • I've commuted in London for 10 years and have used Giant and Ridgeback hybrids, Inbred with slicks, 2 lightweight road bikes and a singlespeed. All worked well in their way with the road bikes most fun but least foul-weather practical. So long as the components and wheels aren't too heavy and not hard-wearing your bike should be a good starting point. and if you like it stick with it. a proper road bike might be faster and more fun in the summer, but the option of mudguards etc might not be open.
    getting there......
  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    Hybrids are great in traffic. Your head is up, you can see all around you, and the gearchanges are generally slick.

    If you're commuting then it might be an idea to close up the ratios on the cassette. I use a 9 speed 12/21. Hampstead is a bit of an effort, but it's nice to always be in the 'right' gear, rather than compromising.

    City bikes are clunkier. For bluestockings only.
  • dondaredondare Posts: 2,113
    Hybrid means nothing 'cept "cross-between", so almost anything can be a hybrid.

    Nothing copes with a city commute better than the trad English Touring bike; a "hybrid" is usually such a bike with flat bars.

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