Brand advice

secretsam
secretsam Posts: 5,098
edited June 2007 in Road beginners
Hi all, am back in the saddle after aeons out, have a battered old 531 that I put together in early 90s, decent frame but now a bit tatty and rusty, shame [:(]. Parts, wheels, etc all tatty and really need replacing.

So: dilemma - do I upgrade beloved old bike, possibly giving it a lick of paint, or do I get a new machine? I like the look of hybrids, eg Specialized Sirrus, but all like 'old style' sports toures, eg Ridgeback Horizon. Am not sure what is a 'good' brand and which are junk, it's been so-o-o-o long since my 'Bicycle' magazine days...

Am only doing light cycling (kids take up my time [;)]), plus some commuting, but would like to do more

All advice welcomed.

My bike's knackered, but compared to its owner it's in good nick...

It's just a hill. Get over it.

Comments

  • Go into your local store and talk it over with them. They will steer you in the right direction. If they seem to be pushing you in the wrong direction ask questions.

    They are there to help you make the right choice.
    Racing is life - everything else is just waiting
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    Should have said "ALSO" like sports tourers

    One day I'll learn to tipe

    My bike's knackered, but compared to its owner it's in good nick...

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • monty_dogcp
    monty_dogcp Posts: 382
    There are broadly three types of brand - the manufacturer themselves, a distributor brand and a shop brand. The latter two generally take a generic Taiwanese frame and add parts, whereas the manufacturer generally has the frame built to their design - probably in Taiwan too. So to take your example, Specialized is a manufacturer, Ridgeback a distributor brand and Pinnacle, say, Evans own shop brand. Generally, for the latter two, don't pay a premium whereas you may want to pay for the prestige of certain 'makes'and their warranties. The latter two usually offer the best value for money as they mainly compete on price. I think price and the outlet itself is a good guide to quality.
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Down the Road</i>

    Go into your local store and talk it over with them. They will steer you in the right direction. If they seem to be pushing you in the wrong direction ask questions.

    They are there to help you make the right choice.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Really there are there to make money (fair enough!) and they are the last place I would look for even vaguely impartial advice! If its up-market, they will tell you you NEED a race bike or a full susser, other end then "this hybrid or mtb will do fine, sir!"

    You've given a pointer towards your thinking. If you add intended use and price point I'm sure a few folk on here will come up with numerous suggestions!

    d.j.
    "The Angels have my 'phone box."
    "Better than The Angels have got your Harley."
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    OK: money around œ500, use: Social, Domestic and Pleasure!!! Getting to station (10 mins) plus general light short rides, 10 miles or so, possibly with family once kids are older (they are nearly 2 now)

    Not too much off road stuff, I think it would be fun but have ridden MTBs on road and it's like cycling through treacle, want something a little more fleet-footed. And light, current machine probably weighs c.28lb, good in its day but now elephantine...

    HTH!!!


    My bike's knackered, but compared to its owner it's in good nick...

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • I doubt many 500 quid 700c wheel hybrids weigh much less than 28lbs!

    On the simple reasoning that an mtb can do anything a hybrid can do, but NOT vice versa, if only one bike then a h'tail with two sets of tyres (or even better two sets of wheels, ready shod with narrow slicks/tractor tyres and mtb/road cassette) offers the greatest riding choice. And the treacle effect is mainly down to tyres I suspect.

    I'll go and hide now...

    d.j.
    "The Angels have my 'phone box."
    "Better than The Angels have got your Harley."
  • domtyler
    domtyler Posts: 2,648
    edited February 2011
    If you go into a shop asking for advice they will most likely try to sell you the most expensive piece of kit they can. Do your own research first on the web and through magazines before biting the bullet. If you go into a shop not armed with this knowledge you could end up being fleeced. Also, shops will not sell every make of bike so you would be immediately limited to what they stock.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Porridge not Petrol
    ________
    Buy glass pipes
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Porridge not Petrol
  • DavidTQ
    DavidTQ Posts: 943
    Ive heard the lines about we sell what we ride so its good stuff from a few different shops all riding and selling different brands. I remain convinced that they will sell you as high a priced bike as they can grab from amongst whatever cycles they have in stock - which would be determined by where they think they can get the best profit \ most sales.

    My cheapy hybrid weighs in at 12.5kg so not exactly light weight, has done a good job of getting me into cycling but also made we want a lighter weight \ faster bike. Now in the final countdown to getting myself a comfort framed road bike, which I found FAR nicer for tarmac use.

    Coming from a BMX \ MTB background I HAD an opinion of "racers" based on low end early 80's models which were horrible things. When getting back to cycling I didnt want a road bike at all but have came round to the idea and after trying a modern machine was surprised how good it felt.

    My hybrid is a dawes discovery 201, I'd say it was well enough built for the money, been a good enough bike to make me ditch my car completely, just now I want more [:D]
  • Fab Foodie
    Fab Foodie Posts: 5,155
    Hi
    If it were me I'd be tempted to get the 531 machine overhauled (which frame by the way?).
    Respray around œ120
    Salvage what you can (keep DT shifters if they are present, no need to go STI), brakes usually clean-up, new pads, new cables.
    Wheels œ100-œ150
    Shop around for drive-train bits, there are bargains to be had.
    Bit of DIY...and a unique and much-loved custom bike emerges!
    May need to cold spread rear-end depending on hub size, but a good shop or re-sprayer may do this.

    Will be a nicer-ride than any 500 new bike out there.


    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1

    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Fab Foodie</i>

    Hi
    If it were me I'd be tempted to get the 531 machine overhauled (which frame by the way?).
    Respray around œ120
    Salvage what you can (keep DT shifters if they are present, no need to go STI), brakes usually clean-up, new pads, new cables.
    Wheels œ100-œ150
    Shop around for drive-train bits, there are bargains to be had.
    Bit of DIY...and a unique and much-loved custom bike emerges!
    May need to cold spread rear-end depending on hub size, but a good shop or re-sprayer may do this.

    Will be a nicer-ride than any 500 new bike out there.


    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Thanks

    It's a no-name from a bike shop in Bristol called Bike Tech, which I think no longer exists. Bought it in around 1988 as I recall, I was looking for a sporting frame to replace a staid touring one, something along the lines of the old Holdsworth Elan (ah - memories!) and they had this one hanging there in my size. œ150 - sold.

    Anyhoo, threw old bits on new frame, upgraded some, and off I went.

    3 years later passed driving test, the rest you can guess!!!

    Tempting to get frame sorted as it's done few miles, but œ120?!?!?!? One option I guess would be to buy a reasonable S/H bike with crap frame and put the bits on old frame, with respray done. But frame has a bit of surface rust, not sure how viable it is to save...but it's not really done that many miles...

    Dilemmas!!! [:(][:(]


    My bike's knackered, but compared to its owner it's in good nick...

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • graham_g
    graham_g Posts: 652
    Get it shot blasted and powder coated.. but not by a bike shop/builder, shouldn't cost more than about œ30 - then you'll just need to find a friendly old school brown apron shop with boxes of bits and a big workshop to give advice on the rest.
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Graham G</i>

    Get it shot blasted and powder coated.. but not by a bike shop/builder, shouldn't cost more than about œ30 - then you'll just need to find a friendly old school brown apron shop with boxes of bits and a big workshop to give advice on the rest.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Thanks - but who would do the spraying??? I think I'd use a 2nd hand machine on e-bay for bits, just been looking naughty me [}:)]


    My bike's knackered, but compared to its owner it's in good nick...

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • JWSurrey
    JWSurrey Posts: 1,173
    Tricky one.
    Obviously, the cost of all the bits, if you replace everything, will be quite a lot - poss. even more than 500.
    Then there are compatibility issues with headset sizes, axle widths, brake caliper drops (27" vs. 700c wheel diameters) i.e. If you intend on buying a donor bike, ensure the parts you need will fit!

    Depends on what you can save.
    Why respray the frame? An old looking frame is less attractive to the criminal element, when parked up in town - which means you're more likely to dust it off and take it to town in the first place.

    Modern dual-pivot brakes are, IMHO, much more powerful than my old sidepulls, especially in the wet on my old 27" smooth rims!

    531 is still an excellent material.

    P.S: The Sirrus range are really nice bikes. If you can get one for 500 notes, that'd be worth considering. Try Phil Corley in MK.
    If it comes with mudguard/rack eyes, that at least gives you some options.
    Consider the amount of clobber you're going to end up carrying and brushing up if you take the kids out on a cycle!

    For a road bike with mudguard eyes, the Trek 1000 got a good review in C+. Go for a triple crankset - If you end up towing your kids on a bike-trailer arrangement, you won't regret it! (don't forget to consider how it would attach to your chosen ride - carbon seatposts aren't suitable for trailer/rack clamps. Clamping anything round a lightweight aluminium alloy frame should be taken under advisement too.

    Hmm... I think i've been over-forumming and under-training this week!
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    Ta muchly, have been mulling over same issues when I should have been earning the money to pay for upgrades!!!!

    I did/am considering the compatablity issues, as you rightly point out, mine is an old horse with 27" wheels (I always wanted to go metric but student money didn't stretch to new wheels!), and see your point re-other bits (eg headsets) fitting. Thankfully I'm not totally gormless when talking to bike shops, I did know my stuff as a younger man (avid Bicycle reader (until it became cr@p) and regular Freewheel catalogue addict - ah, the pre-internet days!!!)

    Anyhoo, I am wondering about current frame as although old it IS decent and 531 but tatty, am worried about surface rust. Agree with point re-pondlife not being attracted to it, however. Interesting to note that at local train station, there is not one decent bike among dozens, even though plenty of money in evidence. Apart, that is, from the donkeys who buy those hideous folding bikes so they can spread oil around other travellers.

    Anyway, looks like a new purchase can't be justified, don't really use the thing enough, but I used to love cycling and (possibly more) all the gorgeous kit that I dreamed of then (and might afford now) [:p][:p][:p][:p]

    My bike's knackered, but compared to its owner it's in good nick...

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • Cheapest refinishing is to rub it down with wet and dry, wire brush any bad bits (usually b/b end of c'stays) and apply two cans of Smoothrite spray-on. If you are patient i.e. multiple thin coats, rub-down between, can get a fair finish for 15 quid.

    d.j.
    "The Angels have my 'phone box."
    "Better than The Angels have got your Harley."
  • Cunobelin
    Cunobelin Posts: 11,792
    As usual - all good advice, but at a slightly different angle, this offering willapply bothto yourold bie's suitability and to selection of a new one. :-

    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">possibly with family once kids are older<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    If you intend to use a "trailer bike" in the future, then ensure you have sufficient seatpost to take the coupling. Equally if you intend to use a trailer, then rear suspension or a lightweignt frame can be under a fair amount of strain.



    <b><i>He that buys land buys many stones.
    He that buys flesh buys many bones.
    He that buys eggs buys many shells,
    But he that buys good beer buys nothing else.</b></i>
    (Unattributed Trad.)
    <b><i>He that buys land buys many stones.
    He that buys flesh buys many bones.
    He that buys eggs buys many shells,
    But he that buys good beer buys nothing else.</b></i>
    (Unattributed Trad.)
  • JWSurrey
    JWSurrey Posts: 1,173
    Forgot to add that we have a Ridgeback hardtail Ally MTB that was bought when Ally was just starting to get popular - It's superb and still going - Nice ride feel.
    It's even done the L2B and c.90 mile Oxford-Cambridge!
    In all the time we've had it, it's had a new BB, chains, brake pads and tyres - still going nicely!
  • fuzzy29
    fuzzy29 Posts: 320
    <font face="Tahoma"></font id="Tahoma">Argos Racing Cycles http://www.argoscycles.com in Bristol will do a complete renovation and respray starting from œ90. Bristol Bicycle Workshop (Tel: 0117 926 8961) are a good source for second hand frames, forks and components.


    <hr noshade size="1">If I had a baby elephant, I'd ask Banksy to paint it....
    <hr noshade size="1">If I had a baby elephant, I\'d ask Banksy to paint it....
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by fuzzy29</i>

    <font face="Tahoma"></font id="Tahoma">Argos Racing Cycles http://www.argoscycles.com in Bristol will do a complete renovation and respray starting from œ90. Bristol Bicycle Workshop (Tel: 0117 926 8961) are a good source for second hand frames, forks and components.


    <hr noshade size="1">If I had a baby elephant, I'd ask Banksy to paint it....
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Thanks, glad to hear Argos are still going, but don't live in BS5 any more...now 100 miles away...hmmmm...

    Did Overbury's survive or die?

    My bike's knackered, but compared to its owner it's in good nick...

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • fuzzy29
    fuzzy29 Posts: 320
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by SecretSam</i>
    Did Overbury's survive or die?<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    I think so. I found this number (0117 955 7924) for them so I hope they're still going.


    <hr noshade size="1">If I had a baby elephant, I'd ask Banksy to paint it....
    <hr noshade size="1">If I had a baby elephant, I\'d ask Banksy to paint it....