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Changing Crankset...

gkerr4gkerr4 Posts: 3,408
edited June 2007 in Workshop
Hello all - hope you can help with some advice...

I have a Trek Pilot 1.2 which I have had since February and covered around 800 miles on since then - including a C2C event two weeks ago.
The c2c was a bit wet at times and we got soaked on the second day for quite a time. The tracks were pretty much wet the whole way over due to the rain - anyway - it went through a set of brake pads as expected, but also by the end of the 2nd day the bottom bracket was making some very dodgy noises and these have go worse since. I think it is goosed to be honest.

It's a Bontrager 'select' triple chainset on an 'isis' bottom bracket (which I believe are known to be a bit poor - is that right?)

My mate said take it back to the shop as it should last more than 4 months and 800 miles - and he has a point. However the shop I got it from, well they sell bikes at a good discount but the workshop seems pretty poor. The setup when I picked my bike up was awful - stem only tightened on one bolt, brake blocks poorly alligned - I had to do a lot of setup myself.

Anway, the crankset and the unbranded brake calipers are the only other things I would like to change (I have put Shimano R561 wheels on it, cinelli Vai bars and gel tape and a spesh Toupe Saddle since I got it.) - so I am thinking I might as well do that.

Ideally I would like 105 however there is a marked price difference between the 105 hollowtechII chainset and the tiagra version so my first question is - is it worth the difference? The 105 is œ89.99 while the tiagra one can be had from ribble for œ35 at the moment!

ok next one - has anyone here fitted the hollowtechII chainset and have you found any problems? I'm fairly handy with a set of spanners and actually enjoy working on the bike so I want to do the work myself. The range of tools is quite and eye opener and I wonder which ones I need! a quick look on Ribble website shows 3 tools relating to the hollowtech cups:
this:
http://tinyurl.com/2jtcjh

this:
http://tinyurl.com/39eexq

and this:
http://tinyurl.com/34q7tt

anyone know which ones I need - or do I need all three? any other tips on fitting or comments in general??

Posts

  • dakidcpdakidcp Posts: 744
    If you're fitting a new Hollowtech II chainset on a bike that previously had internal bearings only (not sure if this is the case with you, but I think it is), you will need to have the edges of the bottom bracket faced to ensure they're perfectly parallel. It's a comparatively easy job, but the tool for it costs hundreds of pounds, so only bike shops tend to have it.

    With regards to the tools, the first two look to be the same thing, but with the second being for a socket/torque wrench. I <b>think</b> the third tool will be supplied with a brand new HT2 BB, but I'm not sure on that, so you might also need it.

    I've not fitted an HT2 crankset myself, but I watched every step of someone disassembling and reassembling an HT2 BB on my recent course at Downland Cycles, and I definitely don't recall there being anything particularly troublesome about it, barring the facing tool mentioned above.

    Others will be able to offer opinions on whether it's worth it for your bike.

    [Edit - spelling]

    <hr noshade size="1">"Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
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    <hr noshade size="1">"Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    <i>Mark Twain</i>
  • maddog_2cpmaddog_2cp Posts: 73
    ^^ what he said

    1 & 2 are the same tool in effect. 2 allows you to use a torque wrench but I'd buy #1 myself.

    3 allows you to preload the bearings. You need to buy this too.

    Difference between the two is the same as ever: finish, weight, ring quality etc.

    <font size="1"><font color="purple">
    Drop bars are a historical accident...... discuss</font id="purple"></font id="size1">
    Drop bars are a historical accident...... discuss
  • msb123msb123 Posts: 274
    there is a also park tool tool which includes 1 and 3 so you don't have to look around for the little plastic dustcap tightener
  • topdudetopdude Posts: 1,557
    Hi, go for the Tiagra chainset, looks good, works perfectly, cheaper, i fitted one to my Trek Pilot and it's excellent.
    Regarding tools, they are not realy needed.
    Use some sandpaper on a block of wood to smooth/face the outer edges of the BB, only need to remove any paint buildup or rough edges.
    Fit the bearing cups by hand then protect with some tape/rubber strip and tighten a (little more) with a pipe wrench /stilsons.
    The preload cap screws into the non drive crank and only needs to be tightened lightly to remove endfloat, use anything that will fit into the splines.
    I check the cups and locking allen bolts regularly and have had no problems.
    Don't be fooled by the (needs special tools) argument, there is always a simple alternative.



    Darkness hides the world but reveals the universe !
    He is not the messiah, he is a very naughty boy !!
  • gkerr4gkerr4 Posts: 3,408
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by topdude</i>

    Hi, go for the Tiagra chainset, looks good, works perfectly, cheaper, i fitted one to my Trek Pilot and it's excellent.
    Regarding tools, they are not realy needed.
    Use some sandpaper on a block of wood to smooth/face the outer edges of the BB, only need to remove any paint buildup or rough edges.
    Fit the bearing cups by hand then protect with some tape/rubber strip and tighten a (little more) with a pipe wrench /stilsons.
    The preload cap screws into the non drive crank and only needs to be tightened lightly to remove endfloat, use anything that will fit into the splines.
    I check the cups and locking allen bolts regularly and have had no problems.
    Don't be fooled by the (needs special tools) argument, there is always a simple alternative.



    Darkness hides the world but reveals the universe !
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    oh right - i'm interested because you fitted this to a pilot too - presumably to replace the bontrager one that was oe?

    Does it feel any better or look better? did the isis one just pack-in on you too or were your reasons for change something different?

    thanks for the advice - so perhaps not as tough as it would appear then!
    graham
  • gkerr4gkerr4 Posts: 3,408
    Oh also - what BB tool is needed to remove the ISIS setup?

    Is there a specific tool - cos I can't find it - or is it just the usual shimano type multi-spline thing??
  • I fitted a Hollowtech 2 to a bike that I built from scratch. This was the first time I had fitted a BB or built a bike and it was very easy. Just a pain to have to buy yet more tools.
  • monty_dogcpmonty_dogcp Posts: 382
    topdude - remind me to never let you near any one of my bikes! Stilsons on BB cups - I can hear the carbon cracking under the strain and I presume your sandpaper block is acurately tested for squareness?
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