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Road bike

AidocpAidocp Posts: 868
edited June 2007 in Campaign
At first I thought I'd made a mistake buying a road bike, al my other ptreviouus bikes have had flat bars. I had a slight strain so I've been off bikes for a week [B)]. Took it for its first proper ride today 37 miles and I loved it, out of the city, its in its element [8D]. What a difference a week makes.

If I had a baby elephant, who would take it for walks?

Posts

  • BuggiBuggi Posts: 674
    i remember when i first got mine. me and my brother spent all night taking it in turns to ride it round the block coz we couldn't believe how fast it was!

    _____________________________________________

    To infinity... and beyond!
    my epic adventure: www.action.org.uk/~Antonia
    _____________________________________________

    To infinity... and beyond!
    my epic adventure: www.action.org.uk/~Antonia
  • Had 3 previous mountain bikes which i had before i got my road bike. Yes what a change makes to how fast & far you can go on a road bike...went for a 30 mile cycle yesterday and enjoyed every bit of it. [8D]

    "In 1949, 34 per cent of miles travelled using a mechanical mode were by bicycle"
    "In 1949, 34 per cent of miles travelled using a mechanical mode were by bicycle"
  • Good are nt they.........

    --

    Insert stupid, possibly baby elephant realated, comment here......
  • hopefulhopeful Posts: 76
    Now, you've got me thinking. I have a Specialized Sirrus and love it, mostly for commuting to work (hence guards and pannier bags essential). I've seen the Sirrus, and similar bikes, described as 'flat bar road bikes', so kind of assumed that the big difference was just the handlebars and, therefore, that the other main distinguishing feature was weight (i.e. that drop-bar bikes tend to cater more for professionals and, therefore, tend to be lighter).

    This post seems to be suggesting that there's something else to it. And what I'm thinking is whether it's worth putting some thought into a 'proper' road-bike. But would it be downright stupid to even consider it in the context of commuting?

    I'm no great shakes at this cycling business, but I do love it and want to get the best experience. I'm happy to stick with the Sirrus, but let me know if there's some great mystical experience that I'm missing.

    All the best.
  • PizzamanPizzaman Posts: 703
    Hopeful,

    There is nothing wrong with your Sirrus, but you can go faster on a road bike, and I reckon that perception of speed is enhanced because of the more '@rse up, head down' riding position. Road bikes are great fun, and you will get used to drops in no time. They are actually more comfortable for commuting, because you can change position (on the drops, on the hoods, and hands either side of the stem for pulling up a hill). If I was you I would get something that can withstand a few knocks (I have a 2005 Trek 1200, which whilst being slightly unfashionable, keeps on going and is cheap enough that if it gets nicked/destroyed, I won't want to top myself!).

    You don't need to spend œ2000 on a carbon dream machine (I wouldn't if you have to leave it anywhere where anyone can get at it), but if it pleases you, go for it). Focus on the frame first, even if you are buying a œ450 - œ900 bike, because you can uprate the groupset and wheels as they wear out, which is much cheaper than buying a new frame.

    There is a lot of choice at the moment for mid-range and budget bikes, I reckon that the larger manufacturers have upped their game and you can buy good bikes for decent prices at these levels. You don't have to be a fast rider to enjoy a road bike, I'm not (I spend most of my time on the brake hoods, hardly any time on the drops).

    Good luck, whatever you choose to do, and if you do get a road bike, it is important to get one you think looks good, otherwise you will be drooling over other bikes as soon as you leave the bike shop!
    Dave
  • hopefulhopeful Posts: 76
    Fantastic advice, Pizzaman. Many thanks. I'm going to start looking around tomorrow...

    All the best.
  • Sh4rkyblokeSh4rkybloke Posts: 209
    Got myself a nice Spesh Allez last Thursday (with an even nicer 20% off at the new bike shop in Manchester) and I have to say it felt so much faster on the way into work today!! I was overtaking people and leaving them for dust without too much effort...

    Having said that, when I arrived I'm sure it had taken just a minute or so less than usual for the 7 miles! Hmmm.

    I cheered myself up a bit by remembering that I did hit mostly red lights all the way, and the bike still needs some tweaks to be completely comfortable (think the saddle is a touch too high, and the seat too far back... duly altered now)... I guess the trip home will be the 'proper' test.

    Nothing in life is foolproof, fools are ingenious

    Nothing in life is foolproof, fools are ingenious
  • "but you can go faster on a road bike,"

    Presumably you mean any bike with drop bars?

    Otherwise, makes no sense. Only difference drops make per se is, potentially, aerodynamics. If you can't contort your torso into the *right* shape, then makes no odds. And a flat barred bike CAN be set up to the same bar-saddle vertical differential as with drops.

    Why is a road bike synonomous with race bike?

    d.j.
    "Like a true nature's child,
    We were born,
    Born to drink mild"
  • PizzamanPizzaman Posts: 703
    I suppose 'road bike' is synonomous with 'race bike', but there could be other factors (e.g weight, width of tyres etc.).
    Dave
  • EvilCatEvilCat Posts: 27
    Hopeful,

    I have both a Sirrus Comp (rack, panniers) for commuting and a Spesh Roubaix Expert road bike for fun/speed. The Sirrus is more or less a flat-bar road-bike, and comparing it with my brother's aluminium Trek with drop-bars there is not much difference in weight. The flat bars give a better 'head-up' commuting position and with the addition of Ergo bar end grips they have a couple of options for changing hand position.

    However, the difference between the Sirrus and my Roubaix is massive (as it should be given the price differential) and feels like a completely different experience. Why this should be I dunno: weight is a big part of it, and the carbon bike is twitchier as well. Perhaps the root of it (at least for me) is that when I get on the Roubaix I know I'm not in commuting mode and it's refreshing not to have to worry about panniers, lights, lock and so on -- just an ultra-lightweight seat pack, a full water-bottle and the open road.

    For me, this combination of bikes seems like the best solution to commuting, shopping, recreational riding, fitness and the odd fast run. Maybe that's just me though...

    EC
  • hopefulhopeful Posts: 76
    I made it to the bike shop today and had a quick look at the Allez. You know how half of you really wants to buy it and half of you hopes to be put off? I told the guy the sort of cycling (commuting) I do and he was in no doubt that I should AVOID a racing bike. Without getting into the terminological niceties of 'road' vs. 'racing', the conclusion was that an Allez or anything in that mode wasn't really for me, that they're racers because they're intended for racing, that they're darned uncomfortable for commuting.

    So I'm grateful to the guy for his honesty. And I know my flat bar road bike (or whatever it is) does the jack of all trades stuff that I really need. And yet... a bit of me is sad to shut down on the Allez...
  • AidocpAidocp Posts: 868
    I ve got a Sirrus (or flat bar road bike) as well I used to use it for commuting when I commuted 17.5 miles and I use it for light day touring and untill I got my road bike I used it on club rides, I still will in the winter.
    IME if you are commuting the Sirrus is more practical but if its a bit of bling your after go for the road bike.

    If I had a baby elephant, who would take it for walks?
  • "the Sirrus is more practical but if its a bit of bling your after go for the road bike."

    So, please tell, WHAT is the Sirrus if not a road bike?

    Sure doesn't look like a downhiller to me!


    d.j.
    "Like a true nature's child,
    We were born,
    Born to drink mild"
  • AidocpAidocp Posts: 868
    I'd call it a fast Hybrid but others do call it a flat bar road bike

    If I had a baby elephant, who would take it for walks?
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