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Wheel difference?

joshwjoshw Posts: 55
edited June 2007 in Workshop
How much difference do better wheels make? I've they are more responsive when climbing/cornering, but will you actually go faster? (lol)

Also, my current wheels have FiR Net 97 rims with Campag Mirage hubs. How good/bad are they likely to be?

Posts

  • cooper.michael1cooper.michael1 Posts: 1,787
    FiR rims are very good i have some, pity they are not more commonly avaliable. Miarge Hubs i assume will be decent quality, if a litle on the heavy side, in comparison to the higher end groups although i have never ridden campagnolo.

    Wheel weight is really an issue regarding climbing, if you live in a hilly area, a lighter bike and especially the wheels and tyres will help.

    However i think it says it all, that many professionals ride normal 3 cross 32 or 36 spoke wheels for training and in tough cobbled races becuase of their strength and reliability. I know they are hard on their wheels but they also have a professional mechanic. My top priority for wheels is strength and reliability and my 36 spoke FiR rims have not failed me yet.

    If you are looking for extra speed, loose a little weight around and improve cornering and handling buy some top notch tyres and light tubes. Depending on what you are using now this can make a hell of a difference and at around œ40, will be a lot cheaper.

    Coops
  • UzbekUzbek Posts: 486
    I've three sets of wheels, handbuilt Open Pro's/Veloce with cheap spokes on my winter bike, Campag Protons and some whizzy new Neutron Ultras I bought this year for my fast bike. I swap the wheels around between bikes a bit (different cassettes/tyre combos).

    Lets face it, when you are riding in the sunshine on your fast bike the fast wheels feel faster! New kit always has this effect, however I have no doubt that ridden back to back (same tyres) the Neutrons gave me a really significant advantage over the Protons. Almost a case of riding one cog higher I'd say. They are faster climbing but also descending (?aero spokes helping).

    The other difference I'd have even less doubt about is ride quality. Against the Open Pro's both Campag wheels feel far more 'alive', they have a springy quality, somehow feeling stiffer (such as when sprinting) but also being more forgiving of poor surfaces. They seem to skim along-espcially the Neutrons.

    As for strength/reliability the Protons have had about 7k usage. They are showing a bit of rim wear but are true and smooth without ever being lubricated.

    I'd totally agree that good quality tyres are a big asset, and cheap too. However those fancy wheels are not just about bling!

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    If North Yorks Council spent as much on the roads each year as I do on my bike then I could spend less on my bike...
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    If North Yorks Council spent as much on the roads each year as I do on my bike then I could spend less on my bike...
  • joshwjoshw Posts: 55
    Ok, thanks. I'll stick with my wheels for now.
    What size tyre is generally used for touring? 28? I'm currently using 23.
  • rustychiselrustychisel Posts: 3,444
    quote:Originally posted by Uzbek

    Against the Open Pro's both Campag wheels feel far more 'alive', they have a springy quality, somehow feeling stiffer (such as when sprinting) but also being more forgiving of poor surfaces. They seem to skim along-espcially the Neutrons.




    Are you using the same tyres and tubes on all three wheel sets. That'll make a big BIG difference.

    I'll hazard a guess that if the Open Pro's were really well built (rather than handbuilt, which as we know can cover a multitude of sins) with good spoke tension etc you'd rate them just as highly as the Protons...


    A old bloke I know was relating the other day the story of his first ever job... you guessed it, as sallow 15 year old working in a bike shop many years ago. He had the job of lacing up wheels, then handing them over to the 'master wheelbuilder' for building and trueing. The 'master' was the 17 year old apprentice, who used to delight in tensioning them up to the point that the nipple would tear its thread off the spoke and fly off. Reckoned this lad could hit a customer in the back of the head from 30 feet away. Ahhh, those were the days.[B)]

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  • gordycpgordycp Posts: 2,341
    quote:Originally posted by joshw


    What size tyre is generally used for touring? 28? I'm currently using 23.


    I've toured a lot on 28mm tyres and found them to be fine. But I've moved up now to a 32 because I don't worry about speed but I do like to feel more secure on rougher surfaces.

    The heavy expedition folk will use something tough and much wider than 32.
  • UzbekUzbek Posts: 486
    quote:Are you using the same tyres and tubes on all three wheel sets. That'll make a big BIG difference.

    I'll hazard a guess that if the Open Pro's were really well built (rather than handbuilt, which as we know can cover a multitude of sins) with good spoke tension etc you'd rate them just as highly as the Protons...


    I have actually used them with the same tyres and the difference remains. I think they are probably not the finest handbuilds in the world though! Perhaps part of the appeal of a factory wheelset is avoiding that variation?

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If North Yorks Council spent as much on the roads each year as I do on my bike then I could spend less on my bike...
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If North Yorks Council spent as much on the roads each year as I do on my bike then I could spend less on my bike...
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