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EPO Testing

Ste_SSte_S Posts: 1,173
edited June 2007 in Pro race
Obviously the current testing procedures don't work, but why is this ?

Are they testing the riders at the wrong times (ie need more out of season tests) or is the test itself just not good enough ?

Posts

  • RadsmanRadsman Posts: 122
    Screening tests allow for limits which can be overcome by masking and micro-dosing. I do believe EPO use has probably dropped and has been replaced by blood doping or something else that we don't even know about yet.
  • andrewgturnbullandrewgturnbull Posts: 3,861
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Radsman</i>

    Screening tests allow for limits which can be overcome by masking and micro-dosing. I do believe EPO use has probably dropped and has been replaced by blood doping or something else that we don't even know about yet.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Have they got a test for HGH yet?

    http://www.stirlingtri.co.uk
  • Philip DavisPhilip Davis Posts: 965
    They haven't got a test for HGV yet, for reasons outlined here:

    http://www.slate.com/id/2143301/

    But fortunately, for reasons set out in this article:

    http://www.slate.com/id/2162473/

    It probably doesn't matter!

    The last article confirms my suspicion, btw, that a lot of the 'benefits' of doping has more to do with the placebo effect than real benefits (EPO being an exception).

    I hate to advocate drugs, violence or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.' Hunter S. Thompson

    I hate to advocate drugs, violence or insanity to anyone, but they\'ve always worked for me.\' Hunter S. Thompson
  • I expect the scientific studies are behind the "field tests" in recognising HGH's value. That article mentions that the effects on recovery haven't really been analysed.

    However, I expect that the mainstay of doping is autologous blood doping.
    What puzzles me is when cyclists do incredible recoveries after a poor performance, such as Jan the year he lost the Tour to Pantani on that stage, he came out the next day and took the stage. Or Floyd last year - I doubt he only took testosterone. Do they just boost their blood back up towards the 50% haematocrit level? If so, wouldn't we hear about the fluctuations in values, even if they couldn't be proved to have doped?
  • Philip DavisPhilip Davis Posts: 965
    The problem so far as i know with measuring haematocrit levels is that the levels can fluctuate for legitimate reasons - altitude training, for example. I've been told that after i returned from spending time cycling in the Himalaya that my 'crit readings would have been about 55, which would have 'failed' me in a drugs test.

    The only way to address this issue is constant (maybe monthly) blood tests from the very beginning of a career to track changes and be prepared to suspend riders when their 'crit levels change in what seems to be an unnatual way. It wouldn't be the same as a ban, it would be just a way of saying to a rider 'something is happening in your body and we are keeping an eye on you'. This sort of long term monitoring of athletes has actually proven very successful at eliminating drug abuse in some national teams. Lots of athletes simply drop out once they know they are being monitored this way.

    I hate to advocate drugs, violence or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.' Hunter S. Thompson

    I hate to advocate drugs, violence or insanity to anyone, but they\'ve always worked for me.\' Hunter S. Thompson
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • andrewgturnbullandrewgturnbull Posts: 3,861
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Philip Davis</i>

    They haven't got a test for HGV yet, for reasons outlined here:

    [snip]

    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Hi there.

    That's the least articulate thing I've read on the subject for a while...

    Cheers, Andy

    http://www.stirlingtri.co.uk
  • Ste_SSte_S Posts: 1,173
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by KingstonWheeler</i>
    This is what happens here in France since 1998. All Elite riders (Elite 1, 2 and 3 categories) have to undergo the "Suivi longitudonal" or season-long testing regime. All riders have blood profiles and hormonal tests done. It's not perfect and some riders find ways around it, but it's a lot stricter than elsewhere.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    As the testing is just season long, could they say theoretically dope during off season training and be 'clean' again in the time for the new season ?
  • stevieschsteviesch Posts: 83
    if we do not like cheats we should throw rocks at them! I for one would not stand at the bottom of any steep stretches in the Tdf!!!More importantly do not buy the bikes,the gear,the kit - if you want to buy "bling" that's up to you but bear in mind that to go faster you need
    a)natural ability
    b)training
    c)artificial help...knowwharrrimean ;-)
    d)bling

    in that order....but it is the bling which generates the cash for team owners, sponsors etc...
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