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Computers & GPS devices

donslowdonslow Posts: 69
edited 18 March in MTB buying advice
Hey all, now that lockdown (hopefully) is starting to see some sort of relax I’m looking to get a bit further afield than local trails and routes for some rides

I have amassed quite a list of “ooh I’d like to do that / go there” rides the length and breadth of the country

As someone with the orienteering skills of a rocking horse I’m wondering if an onboard computer would help?

Here’s what I think would be most helpful to me
- good-great battery life
- Something I put pre-planned routes into and follow
- Possibly also redirect if I go wrong
- not overly concerned with tracking and recording rides but I guess this is a standard feature maybe?
- Don’t mind buying used
- Something easy to use / understand

Looking about I’ve seen the wahoo elemnt roam gets favourable reviews and seems to tick the boxes but I’m concerned it will be too much (cost and feature wise) for something that MAY not get used regularly

What, if any, do we all of the bikeradar forum use?

What would be recommendations from the more experienced of us?

Many thanks in advance

Posts

  • wongataawongataa Posts: 939
    All GPS bike computers will record your rides.

    Your options are:
    Wahoo Bolt/Roam
    Garmin 530/830/1030/1030+
    Hammerhead Karoo 2

    They will all do what you want. Which one people prefer really comes down to which interface they prefer.

    See the DC Rainmaker reviews of them to see the exact features and more about them.
  • reaperactualreaperactual Posts: 962
    edited 19 March
    As your B.R. stalker I'll throw my 2 cents worth into the mix.🤪

    Never bothered with any GPS or computer, just went old school with Google maps and overlay of cycling routes the day before a ride.

    Set off with nothing more than a vague idea and a positive attitude.

    The cycling network routes are just like roads, well sign posted and easy to navigate. Took a few wrong turns but whipped out my mobile and had a quick look or broke man code and asked directions.

    Best times ever riding out the first few times with only a pre determined destination and no clear idea of the route to get there.

    Had great fun with those initial explorations (and still do) of the new and unknown sections of the offroad cycling network.🤘
  • donslowdonslow Posts: 69
    wongataa said:

    See the DC Rainmaker reviews of them to see the exact features and more about them.

    Will have a look at that, thanks

    As your B.R. stalker I'll throw my 2 cents worth into the mix.🤪

    ha ha and there he is again

    Never bothered with any GPS or computer, just went old school with Google maps and overlay of cycling routes the day before a ride.

    Set off with nothing more than a vague idea and a positive attitude.

    That’s exactly how I’ve found the 10 or so local routes that I regularly take minus the maps, just following my nose and then every so often “ooh a gap in the hedges, let’s see where that goes”

    Needless to say, I’ve done my fair share of circling the same areas doing this also ha ha

    That’s mostly the plan with the rides I’m looking at taking and figured mostly it’ll be sign posted but really looking for something as more of a back up in those “ah shite! I’ve no idea where I’ve ended up and no idea how to return” moments

    I would use a phone but to be honest, I care very little for mobile phones and the one I do use has pants reception, pants battery life and is quite simply, well, pants!! Ha ha
  • reaperactualreaperactual Posts: 962
    edited 19 March
    Indeed, 'ah sh#te' moments, been there done that!😆

    A mate of mine who could get lost in his own house uses a mobile phone with an app, something like 'Map My Ride'?

    Even though we've done the same routes together over and over again he still relies on this irritating GPS voice to guide him around and it works.

    Recently dragged myself into the 21st century with a new phone and it's been great, glad I did it but not for use on a bike.

    A mobile phone mounted to handlebars like my mate uses, not a fan at all and there must be similar but much better suited alternatives that do the same thing.

    Sorry, can't help. I'm sure you'll get the answer your after, good luck Buddy!😎👍
  • PMarkPMark Posts: 81
    I just use an old mobile on a Quadlock out front mount. It is then connected to my main mobile in my backpack for internet access. Halfords also do a range of torches (Halfords Advanced) which double up as a USB battery so can use it to make your phone last the whole day.

    When mountain biking I find OS maps to be good as it will generally show the trails better than Google Maps. Komoot is also another good app as it has a good list of rides others have done (use it whenever I go cycling on Holiday).
  • donslowdonslow Posts: 69

    I just use an old mobile on a Quadlock out front mount. It is then connected to my main mobile in my backpack for internet access. Halfords also do a range of torches (Halfords Advanced) which double up as a USB battery so can use it to make your phone last the whole day.

    When mountain biking I find OS maps to be good as it will generally show the trails better than Google Maps. Komoot is also another good app as it has a good list of rides others have done (use it whenever I go cycling on Holiday).

    Thank you for the comment, I must say, my mobile is “an old mobile” which barely makes calls let alone letting me know where to go ha ha
  • donslowdonslow Posts: 69
    edited 19 March

    Recently dragged myself into the 21st century with a new phone and it's been great, glad I did it but not for use on a bike.

    Starting to think I should do the same thing

    A mobile phone mounted to handlebars like my mate uses, not a fan at all


    I’m with you on that realistically

    Sorry, can't help. I'm sure you'll get the answer your after, good luck Buddy!😎👍

    Cheers dude
  • ed1973ed1973 Posts: 233
    Hi
    I use a Garmin Edge 820, it’s so easy to use and has the advantage of being dedicated to all types of biking. I’d be really hesitant about sticking a mobile phone on the bike as they are just too big and snapable. I can plan a route on the Garmin app or use an app called kamoot. They can even plan the route for you then will easily download the route to my device. You can use it as a mini Tom Tom for turn by turn guidance and will get you back on route if you come off route. They will also spit out loads of data for you like speed elevation etc. If you link it to Strava you can also compare your times with your own times or other people’s. Battery life is ace using the correct battery saving settings although if you have everything switched on and running, it will do a good 4 hours at the very least. I picked my up from a popular auction site as they were way cheaper and MAMIL’s are always upgrading to the next best upgrade so you can get a good bargain if you didn’t want to buy new.
  • donslowdonslow Posts: 69
    ed1973 said:

    Hi
    I use a Garmin Edge 820, it’s so easy to use and has the advantage of being dedicated to all types of biking. I’d be really hesitant about sticking a mobile phone on the bike as they are just too big and snapable. I can plan a route on the Garmin app or use an app called kamoot. They can even plan the route for you then will easily download the route to my device. You can use it as a mini Tom Tom for turn by turn guidance and will get you back on route if you come off route. They will also spit out loads of data for you like speed elevation etc. If you link it to Strava you can also compare your times with your own times or other people’s. Battery life is ace using the correct battery saving settings although if you have everything switched on and running, it will do a good 4 hours at the very least. I picked my up from a popular auction site as they were way cheaper and MAMIL’s are always upgrading to the next best upgrade so you can get a good bargain if you didn’t want to buy new.

    That’s brill, thankyou, will look into one for sure
  • I use a Garmin 60CSx which I actually bought for hiking back in 2007. It has a Garmin handlebar mount and the lanyard is carabiner-d so if the mount unclips it won't go anywhere.

    By today's standards I suppose it's a bit ungainly but it does everything you'd want a GPS to do. You can record your rides, including altitude, navigate pre-planned routes both off- and on-road (I've used it in cars many a time) and it'll tell you all you want about speed, times etc.

    The satellite reception is great - it doesn't lose signal under tree cover, for example. The battery life is fantastic - around 18hrs normal use - and it takes standard AAs (normal or rechargeable) which you can get pretty much anywhere if you need to. Oh and it's rain-proof.

    I export my rides to GPX when I get home, then if I want I can add these to Komoot or Garmin Connect. I have Garmin Topo maps loaded into it as well as Open Street Map and it's easy to switch between the two for their different map features.

    If I were buying to replace it, I'd be looking at the GPSMAP 66/65/64 units.
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